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James Arthur Diamond [5]James A. Diamond [4]
  1. James Arthur Diamond & Aaron W. Hughes (eds.) (2012). Encountering the Medieval in Modern Jewish Thought. Brill.
    Each chapter in Encountering the Medieval in Modern Jewish Thought addresses a different Jewish return to the medieval by using a language of renewal.
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  2. James A. Diamond (2010). Exegetigal Idealization: Hermann Cohens Religion of Reason Out of the Sources of Maimonides. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 18 (1):49-73.
    While Maimonides reread his sources to reconcile biblical and rabbinic texts with the demands of reason, Hermann Cohen, in his construction of a “religion of reason,” rereads Maimonides' rereadings of those very same texts. Maimonides' Judaism often bridges the sources toward Cohen's religion of reason by providing a philological anchor that nudges a term or verse now viewed through a more modern historical and evolutionary lens toward its ultimate reason-infused meaning. This paper will explore a hitherto neglected feature of their (...)
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  3. Sharon Portnoff, James Arthur Diamond & Martin D. Yaffe (eds.) (2008). Emil L. Brill.
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  4. Sharon Portnoff, James Arthur Diamond & Martin D. Yaffe (eds.) (2008). Emil L. Fackenheim: Philosopher, Theologian, Jew. Brill.
    Fackenheim's combination of erudition and generosity served to inspire a lifetime of philosophical inquiry, and a number of his students are represented in this ...
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  5. James A. Diamond (2006). MAIMONIDES ON KINGSHIP The Ethics of Imperial Humility. Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (1):89-114.
    In his adoption of the Maimonidean guidelines for extreme humility, the king acts as the supreme existential model for imitatio dei. Imperial governance, when filtered through the prism of Maimonidean humility, results in a regime that most closely resembles a divine one. Using those who occupy the very bottom of the social and political hierarchy (slaves and orphans) as models, the king projects his own sense of "lowliness" to the people. The king thereby promotes their sense of autonomy, and inhibits (...)
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  6. James Arthur Diamond (2004). Leon Wieseltier's. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1).
    : What does one do when the death of a parent demands reentry into an abandoned religious formalism? Raised in an orthodox Jewish home, schooled in the intricate discourse of rabbinic texts and yet long estranged from the ritualism of Jewish law, the prospect is maddening. Filial love compels a yearlong daily synagogue attendance where one recites a mourning prayer laden with myth and superstition. Kaddish is an exquisitely maneuvered headlong plunge into Judaism's expansive intellectual tradition. Thereby the current literary (...)
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  7. James Arthur Diamond (2004). Leon Wieseltier's Kaddish : Mourning as a "Delirium of Study&Quot. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):150-156.
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  8. James A. Diamond (2003). Maimonides and the Convert: A Juridical and Philosophical Embrace of the Outsider. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 11 (02):125-146.
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  9. James A. Diamond, Pinchas Giller, Dov Schwartz, Zachary Braiterman & Gershon Greenberg (1998). Brill Online Books and Journals. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 7 (1).
     
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