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James A. Good [13]James Allan Good [1]
  1. James A. Good (2013). Faith in Life: John Dewey's Early Philosophy By Donald J. Morse. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (2):250-257.
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  2. James A. Good (2011). Neil Gross's Deweyan Account of Rorty's Intellectual Development. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (1):38-45.
    Writing about the intellectual development of a philosopher is a delicate business. My own endeavor to reinterpret the influence of Hegel on Dewey troubles some scholars because, they believe, I make Dewey seem less original.1 But if, like Dewey, we overcome Cartesian dualism, placing the development of the self firmly within a complex matrix of social processes, we are forced to reexamine, without necessarily surrendering, the notion of individual originality, or what Neil Gross calls “discourse[s] of creative genius.”2 To use (...)
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  3. Peter Hare, Joseph M. Bryant, Alan Sica, Bruce Kuklick, James A. Good, Neil Gross & Elizabeth F. Cooke (2011). 3.“What Can I Do for the Cause Today Which I Never Did Before?”: Situating Josiah Royce's Pittsburgh Lectures on Loyalty “What Can I Do for the Cause Today Which I Never Did Before?”: Situating Josiah Royce's Pittsburgh Lectures on Loyalty (Pp. 87-108). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (1).
     
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  4. Paul Fairfield, James Scott Johnston, Tom Rockmore, James A. Good, Jim Garrison, Barry Allen, Joseph Margolis, Sandra B. Rosenthal, Richard J. Bernstein, David Vessey, C. G. Prado, Colin Koopman, Antonio Calcagno & Inna Semetsky (2010). John Dewey and Continental Philosophy. Southern Illinois University Press.
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  5. James A. Good (2010). Rereading Dewey's "Permanent Hegelian Deposit". In John R. Shook (ed.), John Dewey's Philosophy of Spirit: With the 1897 Lecture on Hegel. Fordham University Press.
     
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  6. James A. Good (2007). Thoughts on Randall E. Auxier, "Royce's 'Conservatism'". The Pluralist 2 (2):56 - 62.
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  7. James A. Good (2006). A Search for Unity in Diversity : The "Permanent Hegelian Deposit" in the Philosophy of John Dewey. Lexington Books.
    This study demonstrates that Dewey did not reject Hegelianism during the 1890s, as scholars maintain, but developed a humanistic/historicist reading that was indebted to an American Hegelian tradition. Scholars have misunderstood the "permanent Hegelian deposit" in Dewey's thought because they have not fully appreciated this American Hegelian tradition and have assumed that his Hegelianism was based primarily on British neo-Hegelianism. ;The study examines the American reception of Hegel in the nineteenth-century by intellectuals as diverse as James Marsh and Frederic Henry (...)
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  8. James A. Good (2006). Beyond "Sushiology": John Dewey on Diversity. The Pluralist 1 (2):123 - 132.
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  9. James A. Good (2006). John Dewey's "Permanent Hegelian Deposit" and the Exigencies of War. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):293-313.
    : From 1882 to 1903, Dewey explicitly espoused a Hegelian philosophy. Until recently, scholars agreed that he broke from Hegel no later than 1903, but never adequately accounted for what he called the "permanent deposit" that Hegel left in his mature thought. I argue that Dewey never made a clean break from Hegel. Instead, he drew on the work of the St. Louis Hegelians to fashion a non-metaphysical reading of Hegel, similar to that championed by Klaus Hartmann and other Hegel (...)
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  10. James Allan Good (2006). John Dewey's "Permanent Hegelian Deposit" and the Exigencies of War. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):293-313.
    From 1882 to 1903, Dewey explicitly espoused a Hegelian philosophy. Until recently, scholars agreed that he broke from Hegel no later than 1903, but never adequately accounted for what he called the "permanent deposit" that Hegel left in his mature thought. I argue that Dewey never made a clean break from Hegel. Instead, he drew on the work of the St. Louis Hegelians to fashion a non-metaphysical reading of Hegel, similar to that championed by Klaus Hartmann and other Hegel scholars (...)
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  11. James A. Good (2003). The "Eclipse" of Pragmatism: A Reply to John Capps. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 39 (1):77 - 86.
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  12. James A. Good & Frederick A. Rauch (2002). The Early American Reception of German Idealism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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