Search results for 'James A. Harold' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: James Harold (Mount Holyoke College)
  1. James A. Harold (2004). An Introduction to the Love of Wisdom: An Essential and Existential Approach to Philosophy. University Press of America.score: 870.0
    The purpose of this engaging book is twofold: to explain and justify the primary objects and methods of the discipline of philosophy, and to show how philosophy ...
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  2. James A. Harold (2007). 4. The Importance of Unity and Intelligibility: Reconciling Philosophy, the Sciences, and Our Lived Experience. Logos 10 (2).score: 870.0
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  3. James Harold (2010). Review of Gregory Currie, Narratives and Narrators: A Philosophy of Stories. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10).score: 810.0
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  4. James Harold (2011). Is Xunzi's Virtue Ethics Susceptible to the Problem of Alienation? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):71-84.score: 540.0
    In this essay I argue that if Kantian and consequentialist ethical theories are vulnerable to the so-called “problem of alienation,” a virtue ethics based on Xunzi’s ethical writings will also be vulnerable to this problem. I outline the problem of alienation, and then show that the role of ritual ( li ) in Xunzi’s theory renders his view susceptible to the problem as it has been traditionally understood. I consider some replies on Xunzi’s behalf, and also discuss whether the problem (...)
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  5. James Harold (2008). Can Expressivists Tell the Difference Between Beauty and Moral Goodness? American Philosophical Quarterly 45 (3):289-300.score: 450.0
    One important but infrequently discussed difficulty with expressivism is the attitude type individuation problem.1 Expressivist theories purport to provide a unified account of normative states. Judgments of moral goodness, beauty, humor, prudence, and the like, are all explicated in the same way: as expressions of attitudes, what Allan Gibbard calls “states of norm-acceptance”. However, expressivism also needs to explain the difference between these different sorts of attitude. It is possible to judge that a thing is both aesthetically good and morally (...)
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  6. James Harold (2012). Cognitivism, Non-Cognitivism, and Skepticism About Folk Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 25 (2):165 - 185.score: 450.0
    In recent years it has become more and more difficult to distinguish between metaethical cognitivism and non-cognitivism. For example, proponents of the minimalist theory of truth hold that moral claims need not express beliefs in order to be (minimally) truth-apt, and yet some of these proponents still reject the traditional cognitivist analysis of moral language and thought. Thus, the dispute in metaethics between cognitivists and non-cognitivists has come to be seen as a dispute over the correct way to characterize our (...)
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  7. James Harold (2010). The Value of Fictional Worlds (or Why 'the Lord of the Rings' is Worth Reading). Contemporary Aesthetics 8.score: 450.0
    Some works of fiction are widely held by critics to have little value, yet these works are not only popular but also widely admired in ways that are not always appreciated. In this paper I make use of Kendall Walton’s account of fictional worlds to argue that fictional worlds can and often do have value, including aesthetic value, that is independent of the works that create them. In the process, I critique Walton’s notion of fictional worlds and offer a defense (...)
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  8. Heidi Maibom & James Harold (2010). Without Taste: Psychopaths and the Appreciation of Art. la Nouvelle Revue Française d'Esthétique 6:151-63.score: 450.0
    Psychopaths are the bugbears of moral philosophy. They are often used as examples of perfectly rational people who are nonetheless willing to do great moral wrong without regret; hence the disorder has received the epithet “moral insanity” (Pritchard 1835). But whereas philosophers have had a great deal to say about psychopaths’ glaring and often horrifying lack of moral conscience, their aesthetic capacities have received hardly any attention, and are generally assumed to be intact or even enhanced. Popular culture often portrays (...)
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  9. James Harold (2010). Mixed Feelings: Conflicts in Emotional Responses to Film. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):280-294.score: 450.0
    Some films scare us; some make us cry; some thrill us. Some of the most interesting films, however, leave us suspended between feelings – both joyous and sad, or angry and serene. This paper attempts to explain how this can happen and why it is important. I look closely at one film that creates and exploits these conflicted responses. I argue that cases of conflict in film illuminate a pair of vexing questions about emotion in film: (1) To what extent (...)
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  10. James Harold (2005). Between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Value. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (1):85–105.score: 450.0
    Moral philosophers who differ from one another on a wide range of questions tend to agree on at least one general point. Most believe that things are worth valuing either because of their relationship to something else worth valuing, or because they are simply (in themselves) worth valuing. I value my car, because I value getting to work; I value getting to work, because I value making money and spending time productively; and I value those things because I value leading (...)
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  11. James Harold (2011). Autonomism Reconsidered. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (2):137-147.score: 450.0
    This paper has three aims: to define autonomism clearly and charitably, to offer a positive argument in its favour, and to defend a larger view about what is at stake in the debate between autonomism and its critics. Autonomism is here understood as the claim that a valuer does not make an error in failing to bring her moral and aesthetic judgements together, unless she herself values doing so. The paper goes on to argue that reason does not require the (...)
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  12. James Harold (2008). Immoralism and the Valence Constraint. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):45-64.score: 450.0
    Immoralists hold that in at least some cases, moral fl aws in artworks can increase their aesthetic value. They deny what I call the valence constraint: the view that any effect that an artwork’s moral value has on its aesthetic merit must have the same valence. The immoralist offers three arguments against the valence constraint. In this paper I argue that these arguments fail, and that this failure reveals something deep and interesting about the relationship between cognitive and moral value. (...)
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  13. James Harold (2005). Infected by Evil. Philosophical Explorations 8 (2):173 – 187.score: 450.0
    In this paper I argue that there is good reason to believe that we can be influenced by fictions in ways that matter morally, and some of the time we will be unaware that we have been so influenced. These arguments fall short of proving a clear causal link between fictions and specific changes in the audience, but they do reveal rather interesting and complex features of the moral psychology of fiction. In particular, they reveal that some Platonic worries about (...)
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  14. James Harold (2006). On Judging the Moral Value of Narrative Artworks. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (2):259–270.score: 450.0
    In this paper, I argue that in at least some interesting cases, the moral value of a narrative work depends on the aesthetic properties of that artwork. It does not follow that a work that is aesthetically bad will be morally bad (or that it will be morally good). The argument comprises four stages. First I describe several different features of imaginative engagement with narrative artworks. Then I show that these features depend on some of the aesthetic properties of those (...)
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  15. James Harold (2000). Empathy with Fictions. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (3):340-355.score: 450.0
    IT IS DIFFICULT for me to read Pride and Prejudice without empathizing either with Elizabeth Bennet, or sometimes with her father, Mr Bennet. Not only do my own responses to and opinions of the events and characters of the book at times resemble theirs, but even when they do not, I find myself seeing the event from Elizabeth’s or Mr Bennet’s point of view. For example, at the close of the book, Elizabeth’s former dislike of Mr Darcy has completely vanished, (...)
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  16. James Harold (2003). Practical Reason and 'Companions in Guilt'. Philosophical Investigations 26 (4):311–331.score: 450.0
    Since Phillipa Foot’s paper ‘Morality as a System of Hypothetical Imperatives’ was published some twenty-five years ago, questions about categorical imperatives and the alleged rationality of acting morally have been of central concern to ethicists. For critics and friends of Kantian ethical theories, these questions have special importance. One of the distinctive features of Kantian ethical theories is that they claim that there are categorical imperatives: imperatives which dictate which actions one should follow insofar as one is rational.This way of (...)
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  17. James Harold (2007). Imagining Evil (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Sopranos). The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:7-14.score: 450.0
    In this paper, I explore a set of moral questions about the portrayal of evil characters in fiction: might the portrayal of evil in fiction ever be morally wrong? If so, under what circumstances and for what reasons? What kinds of portrayals are morally wrong and what kinds are not? I argue that whether or not imagining evil is morally wrong depends on the formal and structural properties of the work.
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  18. Christine Harold (2010). The Prettier Doll: Rhetoric, Discourse, and Ordinary Democracy (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 43 (3):296-300.score: 450.0
    The essays collected by Karen Tracy, James P. McDaniel, and Bruce E. Gronbeck in The Prettier Doll: Rhetoric, Discourse, and Ordinary Democracy explore the rhetorical details and patterns of grassroots democracy as they emerged in one particular controversy in a Boulder, Colorado, school district in 2001. Attending to the specificities of the case is crucial to the editors' larger mission: to offer a radically localized alternative to the field's penchant for "grand theory," which, they suggest, too often neglects or (...)
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  19. Franklin M. Harold (2001). Gleanings of a Chemiosmotic Eye. Bioessays 23 (9):848-855.score: 360.0
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  20. James Aho (2010). Harold Garfinkel: Toward a Sociological Theory of Information. Ed. Anne Warfield Rawls. [REVIEW] Human Studies 33 (1):117-121.score: 270.0
    Harold Garfinkel: Toward a Sociological Theory of Information. Ed. Anne Warfield Rawls Content Type Journal Article Pages 117-121 DOI 10.1007/s10746-010-9141-1 Authors James Aho, Idaho State University Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice Pocatello ID 83209 USA Journal Human Studies Online ISSN 1572-851X Print ISSN 0163-8548 Journal Volume Volume 33 Journal Issue Volume 33, Number 1.
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  21. James Harold (2005). Narrative Engagement with Atonement and The Blind Assassin. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):130-145.score: 240.0
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  22. James Harold (2005). Narrative Engagement with Atonement and The Blind Assasin. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):130-145.score: 240.0
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  23. James Harold (2007). Review of Jenefer Robinson, Deeper Than Reason: Emotion and its Role in Literature, Music, and Art. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (6).score: 240.0
  24. James Harold (2007). The Ethics of Non-Realist Fiction: Morality's Catch-22. Philosophia 35 (2):145-159.score: 240.0
    The topic of this essay is how non-realistic novels challenge our philosophical understanding of the moral significance of literature. I consider just one case: Joseph Heller’s Catch-22. I argue that standard philosophical views, based as they are on realistic models of literature, fail to capture the moral significance of this work. I show that Catch-22 succeeds morally because of the ways it resists using standard realistic techniques, and suggest that philosophical discussion of ethics and literature must be pluralistic if it (...)
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  25. James Harold (2008). Review of Elisabeth Schellekens, Aesthetics and Morality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (7).score: 240.0
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  26. James Harold (2003). Flexing the Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (3):247–258.score: 240.0
    In his The Confessions of Nat Turner, William imagining, but with the motives of the imaginer. Styron brings to life the leader of the largest and..
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  27. James Harold (2001). Narrative Vs. Theory. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):48-49.score: 240.0
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  28. James Harold (2009). Fiction and the Weave of Life. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (1):88-91.score: 240.0
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  29. James Harold (1990). Inscriptions and Reflections. Review of Metaphysics 43 (4):882-883.score: 240.0
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  30. James Harold & Carl Elliott (1999). Travelers, Mercenaries, and Psychopaths. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (1):45-48.score: 240.0
  31. Alan James, Harold Tarrant & Lindsay Watson (1992). The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Volume I, Parts 1 (Early Greek Poetry). History of European Ideas 14 (3):427-427.score: 240.0
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  32. Cord Friebe (forthcoming). Don Ross, James Ladyman, and Harold Kincaid (Eds.): Scientific Metaphysics. Journal for General Philosophy of Science:1-5.score: 216.0
    Scientific Metaphysics is a collection of essays in which prominent philosophers of science explore how metaphysics looks like that is judged by scientific standards. Common to all chapters (authors) is the requirement that scientific results and methods should be applied to metaphysical puzzle solving and, hence, the skepticism about philosophical reasoning that is based on the analysis of common-sense concepts and appeals to (modal) intuitions and a priori knowledge. It is, however, controversial what exactly naturalistic metaphysics might be, since at (...)
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  33. James D. Sellmann (2013). Major, John S., Sarah A. Queen, Andrew Seth Meyer, and Harold D. Roth (Translators and Editors), The Huainanzi, A Guide to the Theory and Practice of Government in Early Han China of L Iu An, King of Huainan, New York: Columbia University Press, 2010, Xi + 986 Pages and Major, John S., Sarah A. Queen, Andrew Seth Meyer, and Harold D. Roth (Translators and Editors), The Essential Huainanzi of L Iu An, King of Huainan, New York: Columbia University Press, 2012, Vii + 252 Pages. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):267-270.score: 198.0
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  34. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 2: Issues of Conservatism and Pragmatism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):8-.score: 162.0
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
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  35. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 3: Issues of Utility and Alternative Approaches in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):9-.score: 162.0
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
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  36. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 1: Conceptual and Definitional Issues in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-29.score: 162.0
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
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  37. Stacy Lee Burns (2012). 'Lecturing's Work': A Collaborative Study with Harold Garfinkel. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (2):175-192.score: 144.0
    This article discusses some empirical materials from a collaborative study of "lecturing's work" which the author conducted with Harold Garfinkel. The paper shows Garfinkel at work by presenting a history of the collaboration and discussing what we found. The article also considers some larger implications of our research for understanding how ethnomethodological studies can recover and discover the material regularities of everyday life as they are practiced in distinct settings. The paper reports on a program of ethnomethodological inquiry for (...)
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  38. Jonathan Knowles (2013). Scientific Metaphysics: Ross Don, James Ladyman & Harold Kincaid (Eds), Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, Pp. X+ 243,£ 35 (Hardback). [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.score: 140.0
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  39. Matthias Neuber (2014). Review Don Ross, James Ladyman, Harold Kincaid (eds.): Scientific Metaphysics. [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 68:426-430.score: 140.0
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  40. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue. Part 4: General Conclusion. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):14-.score: 135.0
    In the conclusion to this multi-part article I first review the discussions carried out around the six essential questions in psychiatric diagnosis – the position taken by Allen Frances on each question, the commentaries on the respective question along with Frances’ responses to the commentaries, and my own view of the multiple discussions. In this review I emphasize that the core question is the first – what is the nature of psychiatric illness – and that in some manner all further (...)
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  41. J.-A. C. Pemberton (1998). James and the Early Laski: The Ambiguous Legacy of Pragmatism. History of Political Thought 19 (2):264-292.score: 135.0
    This essay considers the intricate relationship between the thought of William James and the political theory of Harold J. Laski mainly in the years 1915 to 1930. I suggest James's arguments and vocabulary have a greater presence in Laski's work than has been previously detailed. The links between James's and Laski's thought are apparent in Laski's accounts of the self and his descriptions of the nature and structure of social experience; each of these in some way (...)
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  42. Harold Joseph Laski (1940). The Danger of Being a Gentleman, and Other Essays, by Harold J. Laski. New York, the Viking Press.score: 132.0
    The danger of being a gentleman: reflections on the ruling class in England (1932).-On the study of politics (1926).-Law and justice in soviet Russia (1935).-The judicial function (1936).-The English constitution and French public opinion,1789-1794 (19389.-The committee system in Engish local government (1935).-Nationalism and the future of civilization (1932).-Mr. Justice Holmes: for his eighty-ninth birthday (1930).
     
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  43. E. A. Thompson (1954). Andrew Alföldi: A Conflict of Ideas in the Late Roman Empire. The Clash Between the Senate and Valentinian I. Translated by Harold Mattingly. Pp. Viii + 151. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1952. Cloth, 18s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (01):63-64.score: 126.0
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  44. Sarah A. Neeley (2013). A Thicker Jesus: Incarnational Discipleship in a Secular Age by Glen Harold Stassen. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 33 (2):200-201.score: 126.0
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  45. E. A. Sonnenschein (1890). New Editions of the Menaechmi of Plautus T. Macci Plauti Menaechmi, Editio Altera a F. Schoell Recognita (Leipzig, Teubner, 1889). 5 M. 60. The Menaechmi of Plautus, Edited on the Basis of Brix's Edition, by Harold North Fowler, Ph. D. (Leach, Shewell and Sanborn, Boston and New York, 1889). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (05):212-214.score: 126.0
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  46. Paul A. Schilpp (1974). Harold A. Bosley 1907-1975. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 48:168 - 169.score: 126.0
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  47. Norman K. Denzin (1990). Harold and Agnes: A Feminist Narrative Undoing. Sociological Theory 8 (2):198-216.score: 120.0
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  48. Sebastian Gertz (2009). Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Cratylus (B.) Duvick (Trans.) Proclus On Plato, Cratylus. With a Preface by Harold Tarrant. (Ancient Commentators on Aristotle.) Pp. Viii + 210. London: Duckworth, 2007. Cased, £60. ISBN: 978-0-7156-3674-9. (R.M.) Van den Berg Proclus' Commentary on the Cratylus in Context. Ancient Theories of Language and Naming. (Philosophia Antiqua 112.) Pp. Xviii + 239. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2008. Cased, €89, US$127. ISBN: 978-90-04-16379-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):441-.score: 120.0
  49. Gustav Bergmann (1951). Book Review:Power and Society: A Framework for Political Inquiry. Harold D. Lasswell, Abraham Kaplan. [REVIEW] Ethics 62 (1):64-.score: 120.0
  50. Katherine Brading & Xavi Lanao (forthcoming). Don Ross, James Ladyman, and Harold Kincaid (Eds) Scientific Metaphysics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axt061.score: 120.0
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