Search results for 'James A. Muncy' (try it on Scholar)

11 found
Sort by:
  1. Scott J. Vitell & James Muncy (2005). The Muncy–Vitell Consumer Ethics Scale: A Modification and Application. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):267 - 275.score: 660.0
    This study compares college students with other adults in terms of the Muncy–Vitell (1992) consumer ethics scale. Further, the study updates the Muncy–Vitell consumer ethics scale with modifications that include rewording and the addition of new items. These new items can be grouped into three distinct categories – (1) downloading/buying counterfeit goods, (2) recycling/environmental awareness and (3) doing the right thing/doing good. The study also compares these two groups in terms of their attitude toward business. Results show that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. James A. Muncy & Jacqueline K. Eastman (1998). Materialism and Consumer Ethics: An Exploratory Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (2):137-145.score: 290.0
    As the issue of marketing's social responsibility grows in significance, the topic of materialism surfaces. While many marketing efforts encourage materialism, the materialism that is encouraged may have negative societal effects. An understanding of the effects of materialism on individuals, families, society, etc., is important in evaluating whether or not it is socially irresponsible for marketers to encourage materialism. However, the adequate empirical work has not yet been done on the overall effects of materialism. The current paper asks and addresses (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Scott J. Vitell & James Muncy (1992). Consumer Ethics: An Empirical Investigation of Factors Influencing Ethical Judgments of the Final Consumer. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (8):585 - 597.score: 150.0
    Business and marketing ethics have come to the forefront in recent years. While consumers have been surveyed regarding their perceptions of ethical business and marketing practices, research has been minimal with regard to their ethical beliefs and ideologies. This research investigates general attitudes of consumers relative to business, government and people in general, and compares these attitudes to their beliefs concerning various questionable consumer practices. The results show that consumers'' ethical beliefs are determined, in part, by who is at fault (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas, Ziad Swaidan & Mine Oyman (2005). Consumer Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Study of the Ethical Beliefs of Turkish and American Consumers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):183 - 195.score: 30.0
    The ethical climate in Turkey is beset by ethical problems. Bribery, environmental pollution, tax frauds, deceptive advertising, production of unsafe products, and the ethical violations that involved politicians and business professionals are just a few examples. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the ethical beliefs of American and Turkish consumers using the Ethical Position Questionnaire (EPQ) of Forsyth (1980), the Machiavellianism scale, and the Consumer Ethical Practices of Muncy and Vitell questionnaire (MVQ). A sample of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Michael Jay Polonsky, Pedro Quelhas Brito, Jorge Pinto & Nicola Higgs-Kleyn (2001). Consumer Ethics in the European Union: A Comparison of Northern and Southern Views. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):117 - 130.score: 21.0
    There is a growing interest in understanding consumer ethical actions in relation to their dealings with firms. This paper examines whether there are differences between Northern and Southern European Union (EU) consumers'' perceptions of ethical consumer behaviour using Muncy and Vitell''s (1992) Consumer Ethics Scale (CES). The study samples 962 university students across four Northern EU countries (Germany, Denmark, Scotland, The Netherlands) and four Southern EU countries (Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece). Some differences are identified between the two samples, which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ziad Swaidan (2012). Culture and Consumer Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):201-213.score: 18.0
    Disparity in consumer ethics reflects cultural variations; these are differences in the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes one culture from another. This study explores the differences in consumer ethics across cultural dimensions using Hofstede's (in Culture's consequences: international differences in work-related values, Sage, Beverly Hills, 1980) model (collectivism, masculinity, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance) and Muncy and Vitell (in J Bus Res 24(4): 297-311, 1992) consumer ethics model (i.e., illegal, active, passive, and no harm). This is the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ziad Swaidan, Scott J. Vitell & Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas (2003). Consumer Ethics: Determinants of Ethical Beliefs of African Americans. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (2):175 - 186.score: 15.0
    This study explores the ethical ideol-ogies and ethical beliefs of African American consumers using the Forsyth ethical position questionnaire (EPQ) and the Muncy-Vitell consumer ethics questionnaire (MVQ). The two dimensions of the EPQ (i.e., idealism and relativism) were the independent constructs and the four dimensions of the MVQ (i.e., illegal, active, passive and no harm) were the dependent variables. In addition, this paper explores the consumer ethics of African Americans across four demographic factors (i.e., age, education, gender, and marital (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Lumina S. Albert & Leonard M. Horowitz (2009). Attachment Styles and Ethical Behavior: Their Relationship and Significance in the Marketplace. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):299 - 316.score: 12.0
    This paper compares the ethical standards reported by consumers and managers with different attachment styles (secure, preoccupied, fearful, or dismissing). We conducted two studies of consumer ethical beliefs and a third managerial survey. In Study 1, we used a questionnaire that we constructed, and in Study 2, we used the Muncy–Vitell Consumer Ethics Scale. The results in both the studies were consistent and showed that men reported a greater indifference to ethical transgressions than women. Based on the two studies, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kevin L. Eastman, Jacqueline K. Eastman & Alan D. Eastman (1996). The Ethics of Insurance Professionals: Comparison of Personal Versus Professional Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (9):951 - 962.score: 12.0
    This paper considers the level of ethics for insurance professionals for professional situations (measured with three insurance scenarios) compared to personal (consumer) situations (measured by Muncy and Vitell's 1992 Consumer Ethics Scale). The results of the study illustrate that there are significant differences in the ethical behavior of insurance professionals in professional versus personal situations. The authors found that insurance professionals are more likely to actively engage in unethical behavior in order to benefit professionally than in a personal setting. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Andrew Chan, Simon Wong & Paul Leung (1998). Ethical Beliefs of Chinese Consumers in Hong Kong. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (11):1163-1170.score: 12.0
    In recent years, there has been increased awareness of unethical consumer practices in Asian countries. Asian consumers have gained a bad reputation for buying counterfeit products, such as computer software, fashion clothing and watches. In 1993, the estimated losses to US software companies due to Chinese counterfeiting stood at US $322 million (Kohut, 1994). The present study uses a consumer ethics scale developed by Muncy and Vitell (1992) to investigate consumers' ethical judgments from a Chinese perspective. The result shows (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Kathy Wachter, Scott J. Vitell, Ruth K. Shelton & Kyungae Park (2012). Exploring Consumer Orientation Toward Returns: Unethical Dimensions. Business Ethics 21 (1):115-128.score: 12.0
    As customer return rates increase, retailer bottom lines suffer from customers’ misuse of the policies and to the ethics of such practice. The purpose of this study is to explore customers’ orientation toward return behaviors, and to develop a return orientation assessing these dimensions. This research identified three dimensions relevant to consumer return behavior: the planned/unethical returner; the eager returner; and the reluctant/educated returner. A retest with another sample confirmed these three dimensions. Each dimension was analyzed for its relationship with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation