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  1. James A. Stieb (2011). Understanding Engineering Professionalism: A Reflection on the Rights of Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):149-169.
    Engineering societies such as the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) and associated entities have defined engineering and professionalism in such a way as to require the benefit of humanity (NSPE 2009a, Engineering Education Resource Document. NSPE Position Statements. Governmental Relations). This requirement has been an unnecessary and unfortunate add-on. The trend of the profession to favor the idea of requiring the benefit of humanity for professionalism violates an engineer’s rights. It applies political pressure that dissuades from inquiry, approaches to (...)
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  2. James A. Stieb (2009). Assessing Freeman's Stakeholder Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):401 - 414.
    At least since the publication of the monumental Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach (1984), the “stakeholder theory” originated by R. E. Freeman has engrossed much of the business ethics literature. Subsequently, some advocates have moved a bit too quickly and without proper definition or argument. They have exceeded Freeman’s intentions which are more libertarian and free-market than is often thought. This essay focuses on the versions of stakeholder theory directly authored or coauthored by Freeman in an effort to recover (1) (...)
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  3. James A. Stieb (2009). Response to Commentators of “a Critique of Positive Responsibility”. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):11-18.
    It has been claimed that (1) computer professionals should be held responsible for an undisclosed list of “undesirable events” associated with their work and (2) most if not all computer disasters can be avoided by truly understanding responsibility. Commentators of “A Critique of Positive Responsibility in Computing” argue that this is not Donald Gotterbarn’s view (Gotterbarn, JSEE 14(2):235–239, 2008) but that a critique of the view nevertheless raises significant moral issues within computing such as the ethical goals of a computing (...)
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  4. James A. Stieb (2008). A Critique of Positive Responsibility in Computing. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):219-233.
    It has been claimed that (1) computer professionals should be held responsible for an undisclosed list of “undesirable events” associated with their work and (2) most if not all computer disasters can be avoided by truly understanding responsibility. Programmers, software developers, and other computer professionals should be defended against such vague, counterproductive, and impossible ideals because these imply the mandatory satisfaction of social needs and the equation of ethics with a kind of altruism. The concept of social needs is debatable (...)
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  5. James A. Stieb (2007). On “Bettering Humanity” in Science and Engineering Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):265-273.
    Authors such as Krishnasamy Selvan argue that “all human endeavors including engineering and science” have a single primary objective: “bettering humanity.” They favor discussing “the history of science and measurement uncertainty.” This paper respectfully disagrees and argues that “human endeavors including engineering and science” should not pursue “bettering humanity” as their primary objective. Instead these efforts should first pursue individual betterment. One cannot better humanity without knowing what that means. However, there is no one unified theory of what is to (...)
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  6. James A. Stieb (2006). Clearing Up the Egoist Difficulty with Loyalty. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (1):75 - 87.
    This paper seeks to analyze and to motivate a trend toward virtue ethics and away from deontology in the business ethics account of organizational loyalty. Prevailing authors appeal to “transcendent” values (deontology), skepticism (there is no loyalty), or Aristotelianism (loyalty is seeking mutual self-interest). I argue that the “Aristotelian” view clears up the “egoist” difficulty with loyalty. Briefly, critics feel we must “transcend,” “replace,” “overcome” and most especially sacrifice self-interest on the altar of ethics and loyalty. I argue that few (...)
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  7. James A. Stieb (2006). Moral Realism and Kantian Constructivism. Ratio Juris 19 (4):402-420.
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  8. James A. Stieb (2005). Rorty on Realism and Constructivism. Metaphilosophy 36 (3):272-294.
    This article argues that we can and should recognize the mind dependence, epistemic dependence, and social dependence of theories of mind-independent reality, as opposed to Rorty, who thinks not even a constructivist theory of mind-independent reality can be had. It accuses Rorty of creating an equivocation or "dualism of scheme and content" between causation and justification based on various "Davidsonian" irrelevancies, not to be confused with the actual Davidson. These include the 'principle of charity', the attack against conceptual schemes, the (...)
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  9. James A. Stieb (2004). The Morality of Corporate Downsizing. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (3):61-76.
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