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Profile: James Baillie (University of Portland)
  1. James Baillie (2013). The Expectation of Nothingness. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):185-203.
    While all psychologically competent persons know that they will one day die, this knowledge is typically held at a distance, not fully assimilated. That is, while we do not doubt that we will die, there is another sense in which we cannot fully believe it either. However, on some rare occasions, we can grasp the reality of our mortal nature in a way that is seemingly revelatory, as if the fact is appreciated in a new way. Thomas Nagel calls this (...)
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  2. James Baillie (2010). New Problems for Religious Pluralism. Philo 13 (1):5-17.
    John Hick’s theory of religious pluralism posits the same ineffable spiritual reality, ‘the Real,’ as the source of all major religious traditions. He offers pluralism as the best explanation of salvific parity, the thesis that these religions are equally effective vehicles for salvation. Most criticisms of Hick have focused on the explanans, arguing that the Real cannot play any explanatory role due to its ineffability. I raise two difficulties for the explanandum, the thesis of salvific parity. I call these the (...)
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  3. James Baillie (2008). Rethinking Commonsense Psychology: A Critique of Folk Psychology, Theory of Mind and Simulation - by Matthew Ratcliffe. Philosophical Books 49 (2):172-175.
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  4. James Baillie & Jason Hagen (2008). There Cannot Be Two Omnipotent Beings. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (1):21 - 33.
    We argue that there is no metaphysically possible world with two or more omnipotent beings, due to the potential for conflicts of will between them. We reject the objection that omnipotent beings could exist in the same world when their wills could not conflict. We then turn to Alfred Mele and M.P. Smith’s argument that two coexisting beings could remain omnipotent even if, on some occasions, their wills cancel each other out so that neither can bring about what they intend. (...)
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  5. James Baillie (2003). Contemporary Analytic Philosophy. Prentice Hall.
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  6. James Baillie (2001). Finger-Scratchin' Good. The Philosophers' Magazine 15 (15):19-20.
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  7. James Baillie (2000). Hume on Morality. Routledge.
    David Hume (1711-76) is one of the greatest figures in the history of British philosophy. Of all of Hume's writings, the philosophically most profound is undoubtedly his first, A Treatise on Human Nature. Hume on Morality introduces and assesses: Hume's life and the background of the Treatise ; the ideas and text in the Treatise ; and Hume's continuing importance to philosophy. James Baillie provides us with a map to Books 2 and 3 of the Treatise, focusing on Hume's theory (...)
     
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  8. James Baillie (2000). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Hume on Morality. Routledge.
    David Hume is widely recognised as the greatest philosopher to have written in the English language. His Treatise on Human Nature is one of the most important works of moral philosophy ever written. Hume on Morality introduces and assesses * Hume's life and the background of the Treatise * The ideas and text in the Treatise * Hume's continuing importance to philosophy.
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  9. James Baillie (1997). Personal Identity and Mental Content. Philosophical Psychology 10 (3):323-33.
    In this paper, I attempt to map out the 'logical geography' of the territory in which issues of mental content and of personal identity meet. In particular, I investigate the possibility of combining a psychological criterion of personal identity with an externalist theory of content. I argue that this can be done, but only by accepting an assumption that has been widely accepted but barely argued for, namely that when someone switches linguistic communities, the contents of their thoughts do not (...)
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  10. James Baillie (1997). Smart, JJC and Haldane, JJ-Atheism and Theism. Philosophical Books 38:215-217.
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  11. James Baillie (1996). Identity, Relation R, and What Matters: A Challenge to Derek Parfit. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):263-267.
     
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  12. James Baillie (1996). Quine on Translation and Meaning. Cogito 10 (3):199-204.
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  13. James Baillie (1995). Problems in Philosophy. Philosophical Books 36 (4):262-265.
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  14. James Baillie (1993). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 102 (406):349-353.
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  15. James Baillie (1993). Problems in Personal Identity. New York: Paragon House.
     
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  16. James Baillie (1993). Recent Work on Personal Identity. Philosophical Books 34 (4):193-206.
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  17. James Baillie (1993). What Matters in Survival. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):255-61.
    I examine Derek Parfit’s claim that it doesn’t matter whether he survives in the future, if someone survives who is psychologically connected to him by “Relation R.” Thus, were his body to perish and be replaced by an exact duplicate, both physically and psychologically identical to him, this would be just as good as “ordinary” survival. Parfit takes the corollary view that replacement of loved ones by exact duplicates is no loss. In contrast, Peter Unger argues that we place nontransferable (...)
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  18. James Baillie (1992). Identity, Consciousness and Value. Philosophical Books 33 (1):42-44.
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  19. James Baillie (1991). Split Brains and Single Minds. Journal of Philosophical Research 16:11-18.
    This paper challenges the widely held theory that split-brain patients have ‘two-minds’ and can thus be described as being two distinct persons. A distinction is made between the singularity of mind and the coherence of mind. It is stressed that ‘a single mind’ is not something posited to explain coherence among mental contents, but is merely a mark that such coherence holds to a certain degree. However, there is no sharp dividing line regarding what counts as a single mind. It (...)
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  20. James Baillie (1991). The Case for Dualism. Philosophical Books 32 (2):113-114.
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  21. James Baillie (1990). Identity, Survival, and Sortal Concepts. Philosophical Quarterly 40 (159):183-194.
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  22. James Baillie (1990). The Problem of Personal Identity. Cogito 4 (2):106-112.
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  23. James Baillie (1934). The Place of Tradition in the Moral Life. Philosophy 9 (36):405 - 420.
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