Search results for 'James David Velleman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    J. David Velleman (2004). Willing the Law J. David Velleman. In Peter Baumann & Monika Betzler (eds.), Practical Conflicts: New Philosophical Essays. Cambridge 27.
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  2.  64
    James David Velleman (2005). Self to Self: Selected Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Self to Self brings together essays on personal identity, autonomy, and moral emotions by the distinguished philosopher J. David Velleman. Although each of the essays was written as an independent piece, they are unified by an overarching thesis, that there is no single entity denoted by 'the self', as well as by themes from Kantian ethics, psychoanalytic theory, social psychology, and Velleman's work in the philosophy of action. Two of the essays were selected by the editors of (...)
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  3. James David Velleman (2001). The Genesis of Shame. Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (1):27–52.
  4. David Barnard, Celia Berdes, James L. Bernat, Linda Emanuel, Robert Fogerty, Linda Ganzini, Elizabeth R. Goy, David J. Mayo, John Paris, Michael D. Schreiber, J. David Velleman & Mark R. Wicclair (2005). Death in the Clinic. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Death in the Clinic fills a gap in contemporary medical education by explicitly addressing the concrete clinical realities about death with which practitioners, patients, and their families continue to wrestle. Visit our website for sample chapters!
     
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  5. J. David Velleman (2013). Foundations for Moral Relativism. OpenBook Publishers.
    In Foundations for Moral Relativism, J. David Velleman shows that different communities can indeed be subject to incompatible moralities, because their local mores are rationally binding. At the same time, he explains why the mores of different communities, even when incompatible, are still variations on the same moral themes. The book thus maps out a universe of many moral worlds without, as Velleman puts it, "moral black holes”. The five self-standing chapters discuss such diverse topics as online (...)
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  6. David Velleman (1989). Practical Reflection. Princeton University Press.
    “What do you see when you look at your face in the mirror?” asks J. David Velleman in introducing his philosophical theory of action. He takes this simple act of self-scrutiny as a model for the reflective reasoning of rational agents: our efforts to understand our existence and conduct are aided by our efforts to make it intelligible. Reflective reasoning, Velleman argues, constitutes practical reasoning. By applying this conception, Practical Reflection develops philosophical accounts of intention, free will, (...)
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  7.  81
    J. David Velleman (1985). Practical Reflection. Philosophical Review 94 (1):33-61.
    “What do you see when you look at your face in the mirror?” asks J. David Velleman in introducing his philosophical theory of action. He takes this simple act of self-scrutiny as a model for the reflective reasoning of rational agents: our efforts to understand our existence and conduct are aided by our efforts to make it intelligible. Reflective reasoning, Velleman argues, constitutes practical reasoning. By applying this conception, _Practical Reflection_ develops philosophical accounts of intention, free will, (...)
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  8. Dudley Knowles & J. David Velleman (1990). Practical Reflection. Philosophical Quarterly 40 (161):524.
    “What do you see when you look at your face in the mirror?” asks J. David Velleman in introducing his philosophical theory of action. He takes this simple act of self-scrutiny as a model for the reflective reasoning of rational agents: our efforts to understand our existence and conduct are aided by our efforts to make it intelligible. Reflective reasoning, Velleman argues, constitutes practical reasoning. By applying this conception, _Practical Reflection_ develops philosophical accounts of intention, free will, (...)
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  9. David James (2015). Fichte's Republic: Idealism, History and Nationalism. Cambridge University Press.
    The Addresses to the German Nation is one of Fichte's best-known works. It is also his most controversial work because of its nationalist elements. In this book, David James places this text and its nationalism within the context provided by Fichte's philosophical, educational and moral project of creating a community governed by pure practical reason, in which his own foundational philosophical science or Wissenschaftslehre could achieve general recognition. Rather than marking a break in Fichte's philosophy, the Addresses to (...)
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  10. David James (2011). Fichte's Social and Political Philosophy: Property and Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    In this study of Fichte's social and political philosophy, David James offers an interpretation of Fichte's most famous writings in this area, including his Foundations of Natural Right and Addresses to the German Nation, centred on two main themes: property and virtue. These themes provide the basis for a discussion of such issues as what it means to guarantee the freedom of all the citizens of a state, the problem of unequal relations of economic dependence between states, and (...)
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  11. David James (2013). Rousseau and German Idealism: Freedom, Dependence and Necessity. Cambridge University Press.
    The claim that Rousseau's writings influenced the development of Kant's critical philosophy, and German idealism, is not a new one. As correct as the claim may be, it does not amount to a systematic account of Rousseau's place within this philosophical tradition. It also suggests a progression whereby Rousseau's achievements are eventually eclipsed by those of Kant, Fichte and Hegel, especially with respect to the idea of freedom. In this book David James shows that Rousseau presents certain challenges (...)
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  12. J. David Velleman (2015). How We Get Along. Cambridge University Press.
    In How We Get Along, philosopher David Velleman compares our social interactions to the interactions among improvisational actors on stage. He argues that we play ourselves - not artificially but authentically, by doing what would make sense coming from us as we really are. And, like improvisational actors, we deal with one another in dual capacities: both as characters within the social drama and as players contributing to the shared performance. In this conception of social intercourse, Velleman (...)
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  13. J. David Velleman (2005). Self to Self: Selected Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Self to Self brings together essays on personal identity, autonomy, and moral emotions by the distinguished philosopher J. David Velleman. Although each of the essays was written as an independent piece, they are unified by an overarching thesis, that there is no single entity denoted by 'the self', as well as by themes from Kantian ethics, psychoanalytic theory, social psychology, and Velleman's work in the philosophy of action. Two of the essays were selected by the editors of (...)
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  14. J. David Velleman (2006). Self to Self: Selected Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Self to Self brings together essays on personal identity, autonomy, and moral emotions by the distinguished philosopher J. David Velleman. Although each of the essays was written as an independent piece, they are unified by an overarching thesis, that there is no single entity denoted by 'the self', as well as by themes from Kantian ethics, psychoanalytic theory, social psychology, and Velleman's work in the philosophy of action. Two of the essays were selected by the editors of (...)
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  15. J. David Velleman (2005). Self to Self: Selected Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Self to Self brings together essays on personal identity, autonomy, and moral emotions by the distinguished philosopher J. David Velleman. Although each of the essays was written as an independent piece, they are unified by an overarching thesis, that there is no single entity denoted by 'the self', as well as by themes from Kantian ethics, psychoanalytic theory, social psychology, and Velleman's work in the philosophy of action. Two of the essays were selected by the editors of (...)
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  16.  12
    Susan James (1986). The Metaphysics of the Social World By David-Hillel Ruben, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1985, X+189 Pp. £14.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy 61 (237):421-.
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  17. Geoffrey Cantor & Frank James (2010). David Charles Gooding. British Journal for the History of Science 43 (3):459-467.
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  18. Miller David (1990). Reviews: James Tully (Ed.), Meaning and Context: Quentin Skinner and His Critics, Cambridge: Polity Press, 1988,? 29.50, Paper E12. 50, XII+ 353 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 3 (2).
     
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  19. Frank A. J. L. James (1987). A. D. Morrison-Low & J. R. R. Christie , ‘Martyr of Science’: Sir David Brewster, 1781–1868. Edinburgh: Royal Scottish Museum, 1984. Pp. 138. ISBN 0-900733-29-2. £6.00. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 20 (1):93.
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  20. Frank A. J. L. James (1991). David Gooding. Experiment and the Making of Meaning: Human Agency in Scientific Observation and Experiment. Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1990. Pp. Xviii + 310. ISBN 0-7923-0719-4. £60.00. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 24 (3):386.
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  21. Frank A. J. L. James (1994). David Knight, Humphry Davy: Science and Power. Oxford: Blackwell, 1992. Pp. Xiii + 218. ISBN 0-631-16816-8. £30.00. British Journal for the History of Science 27 (2):230.
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  22. Susan James (1986). RUBEN, DAVID-HILLEL The Metaphysics of the Social World. [REVIEW] Philosophy 61:421.
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  23. Frank A. J. L. James (1993). Ryan D. Tweney and David Gooding , Michael Faraday's ‘Chemical Notes, Hints, Suggestions and Objects of Pursuit’ of 1822, London: Peter Peregrinus in Association with the Science Museum, 1991. Pp. Xvii + 152. ISBN 0-86341-255-6. £29.00. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 26 (1):97.
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  24.  2
    David N. James (1987). Ectogenesis: A Reply to Singer and Wells. Bioethics 1 (1):80-99.
    The possibility of achieving ectogenesis, or the growing of a human fetus to term in an artificial womb, is approaching reality as a result of advances in treatment of premature newborns and in in vitro fertilization techniques. In their 1984 book, The Reproductive Revolution, issued in North America as Making Babies, Peter Singer and Deane Wells offered several arguments for ectogenesis. James examines their arguments and rejects two of them, that ectogenesis offers a less problematic alternative to surrogate motherhood, (...)
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  25. David Velleman (2000). The Possibility of Practical Reason. Oxford University Press.
    Suppose that we want to frame a conception of reasons that isn't relativized to the inclinations of particular agents. That is, we want to identify particular things that count as reasons for acting simpliciter and not merely as reasons for some agents rather than others, depending on their inclinations. One way to frame such a conception is to name some features that an action can have and to say that they count as reasons for someone whether or not he is (...)
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  26. V. Denise James (2016). American Philosophy Before Pragmatism by Russell B. Goodman. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (4):686-687.
    Goodman’s book is neither a survey, nor a comprehensive history of American philosophy before pragmatism emerged in the late nineteenth century in the works of Charles S. Peirce and William James, nor does it explore undiscovered depths of American thought possibly overlooked or lost to time. Rather, Goodman’s treatment of five men—-Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry David Thoreau—attempts to follow James’s understanding of what philosophies are and to “convey each writer’s feel (...)
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  27. J. David Velleman (1996). The Possibility of Practical Reason. Ethics 106 (4):694-726.
  28. Daniel R. Leff, David R. C. James, Felipe Orihuela-Espina, Ka-Wai Kwok, Loi Wah Sun, George Mylonas, Thanos Athanasiou, Ara W. Darzi & Guang-Zhong Yang (2015). The Impact of Expert Visual Guidance on Trainee Visual Search Strategy, Visual Attention and Motor Skills. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  29.  16
    David James, Independence and Property in Kant's Rechtslehre.
    I argue that the freedom which is to coexist with the freedom of choice of others in accordance with a universal law mentioned in Kant's Rechtslehre is not itself freedom of choice. Rather, it is the independence which is a condition of being able to exercise genuine free choice by not having to act in accordance with the choices of others. Kant's distinction between active and passive citizenship appears, however, to undermine this idea of independence, because the possession of a (...)
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  30. J. David Velleman (2009). How We Get Along. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the manuscript of a book on meta-ethics. From the Introduction: Maybe the grounding of morality lies closer to the social surface than philosophers like to think, neither in the structure of practical reason nor in a telos of human nature but rather in our mundane ways of muddling through together — that is, in how we get along. Our ways of getting along must themselves rest on the bedrock of practical reason and human nature, but they may form, (...)
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  31.  15
    David James (2016). Independence and Property in Kant's Rechtslehre. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):302-322.
    I argue that the freedom which is to coexist with the freedom of choice of others in accordance with a universal law mentioned in Kant's Rechtslehre is not itself freedom of choice. Rather, it is the independence which is a condition of being able to exercise genuine free choice by not having to act in accordance with the choices of others. Kant's distinction between active and passive citizenship appears, however, to undermine this idea of independence, because the possession of a (...)
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  32.  5
    David James (2016). The Political Theology of Fichte’s Staatslehre: Immanence and Transcendence. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (6):1157-1175.
    ABSTRACTGiven its use of religious concepts and language, it is tempting to class Fichte’s rarely discussed Staatslehre as a political theology. I argue that the Staatslehre can be classed as a political theology because of the way in which it can be understood in terms of the concepts of immanence and transcendence. The concept of immanence applies to Fichte’s account of history in particular. Fichte himself allows for a moment of transcendence at the very beginning of history. I argue that (...)
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  33.  27
    David James (2011). Fichte's Social and Political Philosophy: Property and Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Fichte's theory of property; 2. Applying the concept of right: Fichte and Babeuf; 3. Fichte's reappraisal of Kant's theory of cosmopolitan right; 4. The relation of right to morality in Fichte's Jena theory of the state and society; 5. The role of virtue in the Addresses to the German Nation.
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  34.  4
    David James (2016). Late German Idealism: Trendelenburg and Lotze, by Frederick Beiser. Mind 125 (500):1251-1255.
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  35.  11
    David James (2010). Fichte's Theory of Property. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (2):202-217.
    I discuss J. G. Fichte’s theory of property and its implications in relation to the claim made by C. B. Macpherson that, by broadening the meaning of the term ‘property’, it becomes possible to reconcile two principles of liberal democratic theory that seem to be at odds with each other: the right to property, understood as the right to exclude others from the use or benefit of something, and the right to use and develop one’s capacities. I argue that Fichte’s (...)
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  36.  29
    David N. James (1986). The Acquisition of Virtue. The Personalist Forum 2 (2):101-121.
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  37.  13
    David James (2014). The Concept of Practical Necessity From Thucydides to Marx. Theoria 61 (138):1-17.
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  38.  59
    David James (2011). The 'Self-Positing' Self in Kierkegaard's The Sickness Unto Death. The European Legacy 16 (5):587 - 598.
    In response to the claim that Kierkegaard's highly compressed definition of the self, given near the beginning of The Sickness unto Death, should be understood in Hegelian terms, I show that it can be better understood in terms of an earlier development in the history of German idealism, namely, Fichte's theory of self-consciousness. The notion that the self ?posits? itself found in this theory will be used to explain Kierkegaard's definition of the self, including his rejection of the idea that (...)
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  39.  44
    David James (2013). Rousseau on Dependence and the Formation of Political Society. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):343-366.
    : I explore Rousseau's account of the problem of dependence by means of an analysis of the distinction he makes between dependence on things and dependence on men. With reference to his Second Discourse, I argue that dependence on things alone exists only in the case of primitive man in the earliest stages of the state of nature, while dependence on men is more properly to be understood as dependence on other human beings as mediated by dependence on things. I (...)
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  40.  21
    David James (2012). Subjective Freedom and Necessity in Hegel's Philosophy of Right. Theoria 59 (131):41-63.
    Hegel associates 'subjective' freedom with various rights, all of which concern the subject's particularity, and with the demand that this particularity be accorded proper recognition within the modern state. I show that Hegel's account of subjective freedom can be assimilated to the 'positive' model of freedom that is often attributed to him because of the way in which the objective determinations of right recognise the subject's particularity in the form of individual welfare. To this extent, the practical constraints to which (...)
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  41.  5
    David James (2015). Enlightenment and the Unconditional Good: From Fichte to the Frankfurt School. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (1):26-44.
    In a series of lectures from 1804–05, Johann Gottlieb Fichte sets out a conception of enlightenment whose basic structure is, I argue, to some extent reproduced in two more famous accounts of enlightenment found in post-Kantian German philosophy: Hegel’s account of the Enlightenment’s struggle with faith in his Phenomenology of Spirit and the conception of enlightenment rationality presented in Horkheimer and Adorno’s Dialectic of Enlightenment. The narrative I offer serves to highlight, moreover, the critical role played by the notion of (...)
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  42.  16
    David James (2014). The Closed Commercial State: Perpetual Peace and Commercial Society From Rousseau to Fichte. The European Legacy 19 (1):122-124.
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  43.  22
    David James (2010). Fichte on the Vocation of the Scholar and the (Mis)Use of History. Review of Metaphysics 63 (3):539-566.
    In his early Some Lectures concerning the Scholar’s Vocation, J. G. Fichte developed an account of the social role of the scholar. This role concerns the task of furthering human culture and progress, which Fichte considers to be a moral duty for the scholar. In these lectures, Fichte also outlined the capabilities and knowledge that the scholar needs in order to be able to fulfill the task in question, including the possession of historical knowledge. The article argues that the later (...)
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  44.  21
    David N. James (1992). Twenty Questions: Kant's Applied Ethics. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):67-87.
  45.  9
    David James (2006). From the Age of Heroes to the Prose of Everyday Life: Hegel on the Differences Between the Original and the Modern Epic. History of European Ideas 32 (2):190-204.
    I offer an interpretation of Hegel's account of the essential differences between the original epic and the modern epic which supports two claims that have been made on the basis of the available student transcripts of Hegel's lectures on the philosophy of art: Hegel never asserted that art had come to an end in the sense of its having no further significance or interest in the modern world; and Hegel was keen to understand art as a cultural and historical phenomenon, (...)
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  46. David James (2004). The Role Of Modern Irony In Hegel's Philosophy Of Right: Graduate Essay Prize Runner Up. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 49:127-138.
     
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  47.  5
    David N. James (1989). On Colorizing Films: A Venture Into Applied Aesthetics. Metaphilosophy 20 (3-4):332-340.
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  48.  33
    David James (2011). Civil Society and Literature: Hegel and Lukács on the Possibility of a Modern Epic. The European Legacy 16 (2):205-221.
    It is claimed that Hegel denies the possibility of a modern epic and that his lectures on aesthetics demand the condemnation of all the art of his own time. I use the available student transcripts of his lectures on aesthetics, in conjunction with Lukács's views on the novel, to show that Hegel suggests that the novel might count as a modern epic and that it may perform a significant function in modern ethical life (Sittlichkeit) as presented in his own philosophy (...)
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  49.  22
    David James (2015). Conceptual Innovation in Fichte's Theory of Property: The Genesis of Leisure as an Object of Distributive Justice. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):509-528.
    Fichte's definitions of property appear to diverge from modern common linguistic usage, especially his identification of leisure as the object of an absolute right of property, and they may even appear arbitrary. I argue that these definitions are not in fact arbitrary. Rather, any divergence from common linguistic usage can be explained in terms of a conceptual innovation which consists in expanding or modifying a concept by thinking it through, thereby generating new content. In the case of Fichte's theory of (...)
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  50.  20
    David N. James (1991). Kant's Virtue Ethics and the Cultivation of Moral Skills. Social Philosophy Today 6:29-41.
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