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  1. James E. Faulconer (2009). Theological and Philosophical Transcendence: Bodily Excess; the Word Made Flesh. Studia Phaenomenologica 9:223-235.
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  2.  2
    Stephen C. Yanchar, Jonathan S. Spackman & James E. Faulconer (2013). Learning as Embodied Familiarization. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 33 (4):216.
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  3. James E. Faulconer & R. Williams (eds.) (1990). Reconsidering Psychology. Duquesne University Press.
  4.  17
    James E. Faulconer (1983). Heidegger, Semiotics, and Genesis. Semiotics:423-434.
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  5.  8
    James E. Faulconer (2008). The Past and Future Community. Levinas Studies 3:79-100.
    Emmanuel Levinas asks, “In what meaning can community dress itself without reducing Difference?” (OB 154 / AE 197). Can there be a community that does not create its unity by erasing the differences between those whom it joins, a community that does not establish itself by imposing the Same? His answer is yes. Contrary to the thinkers of community in the philosophical tradition, thinkers like Hobbes, Rousseau, and Kant, Levinas states, “between the one I am and theother for whom I (...)
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  6.  6
    Samuel D. Downs, Edwin E. Gantt & James E. Faulconer (2012). Levinas, Meaning, and an Ethical Science of Psychology: Scientific Inquiry as Rupture. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (2):69-85.
    Much of the understanding of the nature of science in contemporary psychology is founded on a positivistic philosophy of science that cannot adequately account for meaning as experienced. The phenomenological tradition provides an alternative approach to science that is attentive to the inherent meaningfulness of human action in the world. Emmanuel Levinas argues, however, that phenomenology, at least as traditionally conceived, does not provide sufficient grounds for meaning. Levinas argues that meaning is grounded in the ethical encounter with the Other (...)
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    James E. Faulconer (1998). Whose Voice Do I Hear? Risser on Gadamer on the Other. Research in Phenomenology 28 (1):292-298.
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  8.  4
    James E. Faulconer (1998). The Uncanny Origin of Ethics. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 20 (2/1):233-247.
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  9.  1
    James E. Faulconer (1998). The Uncanny Origin of Ethics: Gift, Interruption Or...? Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 20 (2/1):233-247.
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  10.  5
    James E. Faulconer (1990). Review of Aristotle's Psychology. [REVIEW] Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):51-53.
    Reviews the book, Aristotle's psychology by Daniel N. Robinson . Daniel Robinson has provided an excellent introduction to an overview of Aristotle's psychology, giving background necessary for understanding that psychology, teasing a psychology out the variety of Aristotle's work, and placing Aristotle's psychology sympathetically within the broader scope of his scientific inquiry. Robinson takes on difficult issues such as the relation between Plato and Aristotle, Aristotle's theory of causation, and what Aristotle meant by soul, and he deals with them lucidly (...)
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  11.  30
    James E. Faulconer & Mark A. Wrathall (eds.) (2000). Appropriating Heidegger. Cambridge University Press.
    Although Martin Heidegger is undeniably one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, among the philosophers who study his work we find considerable disagreement over what might seem to be basic issues: why is Heidegger important? What did his work do? This volume is an explicit response to these differences, and is unique in bringing together representatives of many different approaches to Heidegger's philosophy. Topics covered include Heidegger's place in the 'history of being', Heidegger and ethics, Heidegger and (...)
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  12. James E. Faulconer & Mark A. Wrathall (eds.) (2008). Appropriating Heidegger. Cambridge University Press.
    Although Martin Heidegger is undeniably one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, among the philosophers who study his work we find considerable disagreement over what might seem to be basic issues: why is Heidegger important? What did his work do? This volume is an explicit response to these differences, and is unique in bringing together representatives of many different approaches to Heidegger's philosophy. Topics covered include Heidegger's place in the 'history of being', Heidegger and ethics, Heidegger and (...)
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  13. James E. Faulconer & Mark A. Wrathall (eds.) (2009). Appropriating Heidegger. Cambridge University Press.
    Although Martin Heidegger is undeniably one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, among the philosophers who study his work we find considerable disagreement over what might seem to be basic issues: why is Heidegger important? What did his work do? This volume is an explicit response to these differences, and is unique in bringing together representatives of many different approaches to Heidegger's philosophy. Topics covered include Heidegger's place in the 'history of being', Heidegger and ethics, Heidegger and (...)
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  14. James E. Faulconer (1990). Aristotle's Two Systems. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):51-53.
     
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  15. James E. Faulconer (1995). Newton, Science, and Causation. Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (1):77-86.
    Contrary to common belief, acceptance of Newtonian causation does not commit one to a mechanistic, materialistic, or deterministic understanding of the world. I argue that the Newtonian view can be assimilated to contemporary theoretical alternatives in psychology. This means that, given the Newtonian understanding of causation, it is possible for such alternatives to be scientific - to treat of causes - without requiring either mechanism, materialism, or mathematical formalizations. I argue that we best understand Newtonian causation as formal causation. I (...)
     
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  16. James E. Faulconer (2003). Transcendence in Philosophy and Religion. Indiana University Press.
    Can transcendence be both philosophical and religious? Do philosophers and theologians conceive of the same thing when they think and talk about transcendence? Philosophy and religion have understood transcendence and other matters of faith differently, but both the language and concepts of religion, including transcendence, reside at the core of postmodern philosophy. Transcendence in Philosophy and Religion considers whether it is possible to analyze religious transcendence in a philosophical manner, and if so, whether there is a way for phenomenology to (...)
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