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James Fieser [43]James F. Fieser [1]
  1. James Fieser (2013). The Hume Literature, 2010. Hume Studies 37 (2):285-294.
    This bibliography covers the Hume literature for 2010, and follows upon the annual update begun by Rolland Hall for the years 1977 through 1985 and continued by William Edward Morris for 1986 through 2003. This installment, like previous ones, excludes items published in Hume Studies, which are indexed annually in each November issue. Readers of Hume Studies may contact me at jfieser@utm.edu with additions or corrections to any previous year, which can be noted in future installments. I am grateful to (...)
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  2. James Fieser (2011). Hume, David. In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  3. James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.) (2011). Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  4. James Fieser (2010). The Hume Literature, 2009. Hume Studies 36 (2):243-257.
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  5. James Fieser (2008). The Hume Literature, 2008. Hume Studies 34 (2):309-320.
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  6. Louis P. Pojman & James Fieser (eds.) (2008). Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press.
    Now in a third edition, Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings is a highly acclaimed, topically organized collection that covers five major areas of philosophy--theory of knowledge, philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, freedom and determinism, and moral philosophy. Editor Louis P. Pojman enhances the text's topical organization by arranging the selections into a pro/con format to help students better understand opposing arguments. He also includes accessible introductions to each chapter, subsection, and individual reading, a unique feature for an (...)
     
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  7. James Fieser (2007). Pyrronizm Hume'a: interpretacja poszerzona. Nowa Krytyka 20.
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  8. James Fieser (2007). The Hume Literature, 2006 and 2007. Hume Studies 33 (2):361-382.
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  9. James Fieser (2007). The Rise and Fall of James Beattie's Common-Sense Theory of Truth. The Monist 90 (2):287-296.
  10. James Fieser (2006). The Hume Literature, 2004 and 2005. Hume Studies 32 (2):371-388.
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  11. James Fieser & Norman Lillegard (eds.) (2005). Philosophical Questions: Readings and Interactive Guides. Oxford University Press.
    In Philosophical Questions: Readings and Interactive Guides, James Fieser and Norman Lillegard make classic and contemporary philosophical writings genuinely accessible to students by incorporating numerous pedagogical aids throughout the book. Presenting the readings in manageable segments, they provide commentaries that elucidate difficult passages, explain archaic or technical terminology, and expand upon allusions to unfamiliar literature and arguments. In addition, opening "First Reactions" discussion questions, study questions, logic boxes, and chapter summaries require students to delve more deeply into important issues and (...)
     
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  12. James Fieser & Norman Lillegard (2005). Philosophical Questions: Readings and Interactive Guides: Instructor's Manual and Test Questions: CD with PowerPoints. OUP USA.
    This is the Techer's Handbook (with Powerpoint slides) CD-Rom to accompany James Fieser and Norman Lillegard's Philosophical Questions: Readings and INteractive Guides. It contains chapter summaries and goals, discussion text, topical links and activities, suggestions for further readings, exam questions and answers, and Powerpoint slides.
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  13. James Fieser, David Hume: Life and Writings. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  14. James Fieser, David Hume: Metaphysical and Epistemological Theories. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  15. James Fieser, Ethics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  16. James Fieser & Norman Lillegard (eds.) (2002). A Historical Introduction to Philosophy: Texts and Interactive Guides. Oxford University Press.
    Featuring a unique pedagogical apparatus, A Historical Introduction to Philosophy: Texts and Interactive Guides provides selections from the most influential primary works in philosophy from the Presocratics through the twentieth century, integrating them with substantial commentary and study questions. It offers extensive treatment of the Hellenistic and Renaissance periods--which are typically given only minimal coverage in other anthologies--and devotes substantial chapters to nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophy. The selections are organized historically and are presented in short and manageable sections with organizational (...)
     
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  17. James Fieser, David Hume -- Moral Theory. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  18. James Fieser, David Hume -- Writings on Religion. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  19. James Fieser, David Hume - Essays. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  20. James Fieser (ed.) (2001). Early Responses to Hume's Writings on Religion. Thoemmes Press.
    In the past 250 years, David Hume probably had a greater impact on the field of philosophy of religion than any other single philosopher. He relentlessly attacked the standard proofs for God's existence, traditional notions of God's nature and divine governance, the connection between morality and religion, and the rationality of belief in miracles. He also advanced radical theories of the origin of religious ideas, grounding such notions in human psychology rather than in divine reality. In the last decade of (...)
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  21. James Fieser (2001). Religion and Hume's Legacy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):299-300.
  22. James Fieser (2000). Moral Philosophy Through the Ages. Mayfield Pub..
    This book takes a middle ground between the topical and historical approaches to Western ethics. The chapters are topically arranged, but preserve the flow of history in two ways. First, each chapter explains the historical development of the topic under consideration. Second, most chapters focus on a specific famous philosopher who championed a particular tradition, such as Aristotle, Locke, or Kant, and the chapters are chronologically ordered based on when these key philosophers lived.
     
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  23. James Fieser & James Oswald (eds.) (2000). Scottish Common Sense Philosophy: Sources and Origins. Thoemmes Press.
    The Scottish Common Sense School of philosophy emerged during the Scottish Enlightenment of the second half of the eighteenth century. The School’s principal proponents were Thomas Reid, James Oswald, James Beattie and Dugald Stewart. They believed that we are all naturally implanted with an array of common sense intuitions and these intuitions are in fact the foundation of truth. Their approach dominated philosophical thought in Great Britain and the United States until the mid nineteenth century. In recent years philosophers have (...)
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  24. James Fieser (1999). Religion and Faction in Hume's Moral Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):170-171.
  25. James Fieser (1998). Hume on Miracles. Hume Studies 24 (1):195-200.
  26. James Fieser (1998). Hume on Miracles, And: Hume on Natural Religion (Review). Hume Studies 24 (1):195-200.
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  27. James Fieser (1998). Hume's Wide View of the Virtues. Hume Studies 24 (2):295-311.
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  28. James Fieser (1998). Hume's Wide View of the Virtues: An Analysis of His Early Critics. Hume Studies 24 (2):295-311.
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  29. James Fieser (1998). Hume on Miracles_, And: _Hume on Natural Religion (Review). Hume Studies 24 (1):195-200.
  30. James Fieser (1997). Hume's Motivational Distinction Between Natural and Artificial Virtues. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (2):373 – 388.
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  31. James Fieser (1996). Do Businesses Have Moral Obligations Beyond What the Law Requires? Journal of Business Ethics 15 (4):457 - 468.
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  32. James Fieser (1996). The Eighteenth-Century British Reviews of Hume's Writings. Journal of the History of Ideas 57 (4):645-657.
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  33. James Fieser (1995). Hume's Concealed Attack on Religion and His Early Critics. Journal of Philosophical Research 20:431-449.
    Like Hume scholars today, Hume’s 18th century critics recognized his use of literary devices in his religious writings. Indeed, the early commentaries on Hume’s religious writings are dominated by attempts to identify and decode Hume’s concealed religious views. Little work has been done in Hume scholarship to understand the nature and scope of this aspect of his early critics. The purpose of the present essay is to resurrect the discussions of the “Natural History” and the Dialogues in which Hume’s 18th (...)
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  34. James Fieser (1994). Beattie's Lost Letter to the London Review. Hume Studies 20 (1):73-84.
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  35. James Fieser (1993). Callicott and the Metaphysical Basis of Ecocentric Morality. Environmental Ethics 15 (2):171-180.
    According to the theory of ecocentric morality, the environment and its many ecosystems are entitled to a direct moral standing, and not simply a standing derivative from human interests. J. Baird Callicott has offered two possible metaphysical foundations for ecocentrism that attempt to show that inherent goodness can apply to environmental collections and not just to individual agents. I argue that Callicott’s first theory fails because it relies on a problematic theory of moral sentiments and that his second theory fails (...)
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  36. James Fieser (1993). Moore, Spencer, and the Naturalistic Fallacy. History of Philosophy Quarterly 10 (3):271 - 276.
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  37. James Fieser (1992). Hume's Classification of the Passions and Its Precursors. Hume Studies 18 (1):1-17.
  38. James Fieser (1992). The Correlativity of Duties and Rights. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):1-7.
  39. James Fieser (1992). The Compatibility of Eco-Centric Morality. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (1):37-40.
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  40. James F. Fieser (1992). The Logic of Natural Law in Aquinas's “Treatise on Law”. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:155-172.
    Against recent commentators such as Annstrong, D’Arcy, Copleston, O’Connor, Bourke, and Grisez, I argue that the logic referred to by Thomas in his “Treatise on Law” should not be understood metaphorically. Instead, it involves a chain of syllogisms, beginning with the synderesis principle, followed by primary, secondary, and tertiary principles, and ends with a practical syllogism. In showing this, I attack the view that the synderesis principle, “good ought to be done and evil avoided,” is tautological . Second, I show (...)
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  41. James Fieser (1989). Hume's Pyrrhonism. Hume Studies 15 (1):93-119.
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  42. James Fieser (1989). Hume's Pyrrhonism: A Developmental Interpretation. Hume Studies 15 (1):93-119.
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  43. James Fieser (1989). Is Hume a Moral Skeptic? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (1):89-105.
    I will approach this issue by seeing how Hume's moral theory compares to a contemporary standard of moral skepticism. Using J. L. Mackie's analysis of moral skepticism as a point of reference, I will argue that, as a normative theory, Hume's account of morality is not at all skeptical since he is offering a relatively optimistic consequentialist theory of right and wrong action. As a metaethical theory, however, I will argue that Hume is a weak metaethical skeptic insofar as he (...)
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