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  1. James G. Buickerood & John P. Wright (2006). John William Yolton, 1921-2005. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 79 (5):139 - 142.
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  2. James G. Buickerood (2005). What is It with Damaris, Lady Masham?: The Historiography of One Early Modern Woman Philosopher. Locke Studies 5:179-214.
  3. Craig Brandist, James G. Buickerood, James E. Crimmins, Jonathan Elukin, Matt Erlin, Matthew R. Goodrum, Paul Guyer, Leor Halevi, Neil Hargraves & Peter Harrison (2002). Andrews, Naomi J.:“La Mère Humanité”: Femininity in the Romantic Socialism of Pierre Leroux and the Abbé A.-L. Constant........... Boyle, Marjorie O'Rourke: Pure of Heart: From Ancient Rites to Renaissance Plato..................................... [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Ideas 63:745-746.
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  4. James G. Buickerood (2002). "The Whole Exercise of Reason": Charles Mein's Account of Rationality. Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (4):639-658.
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  5. James G. Buickerood (1996). A Philosophick Essay Concerning Ideas, According to Dr. Sherlock's Principles.
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  6. James G. Buickerood (1990). Peirce. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):115-116.
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  7. James G. Buickerood (1988). John Locke and Medicine. International Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):108-109.
  8. James G. Buickerood (1988). The "Basis and Foundation of All Knowledge Whatsoever": Toward a History of the Concept of Consciousness in Early Modern Philosophy. Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    The long-accepted interpretation of the history of modern philosophy is that, beginning with Descartes, philosophers explicitly took the data of consciousness as their epistemic foundation. Descartes supposedly held that the mind always thinks and that consciousness is an necessary to thought. Unsatisfied with this doctrine, Leibniz and Locke modified this view of the conscious nature of thought. The former introduced the concept of unconscious thought with petites perceptions, the latter argued that while thought is conscious, the mind does not always (...)
     
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  9. James G. Buickerood (1985). The Natural History of the Understanding: Locke and the Rise of Facultative Logic in the Eighteenth Century. History and Philosophy of Logic 6 (1):157-190.
    Whatever its merits and difficulties, the concept of logic embedded in much of the "new philosophy" of the early modern period was then understood to supplant contemporary views of formal logic. The notion of compiling a natural history of the understanding constituted the basis of this new concept of logic. The following paper attempts to trace this view of logic through some of the major and numerous minor texts of the period, centering on the development and influence of John Locke's (...)
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