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James Grant [7]James Wa Grant [1]
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Profile: James Grant (Portland State University)
  1. James Grant (forthcoming). The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution, by Stephen Davies. Mind:fzu102.
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  2. James Grant (2013). The Critical Imagination. Oxford University Press.
    The Critical Imagination is a study of metaphor, imaginativeness, and criticism of the arts. Since the eighteenth century, many philosophers have argued that appreciating art is rewarding because it involves responding imaginatively to a work. Literary works can be interpreted in many ways; architecture can be seen as stately, meditative, or forbidding; and sensitive descriptions of art are often colourful metaphors: music can 'shimmer', prose can be 'perfumed', and a painter's colouring can be 'effervescent'. Engaging with art, like creating it, (...)
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  3. James Grant (2012). The Value of Imaginativeness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (2):275-289.
    The aim of this paper is to explain why imaginativeness is valuable. Recent discussions of imaginativeness or creativity (which I regard as the same property) have paid relatively little attention to this important question. My discussion has three parts. First, I elucidate the concept of imaginativeness by providing three conditions a product or act must satisfy in order to be imaginative. This account enables us to explain, among other things, why imaginativeness is associated with inspiration, why it is associated with (...)
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  4. James Grant (2011). Metaphor and Criticism BSA Prize Essay, 2010. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):237-257.
    The prevalence of colourful metaphors and figurative language in critics’ descriptions of artworks has long attracted attention. Talk of ‘liquid melodies’, ‘purple prose’, ‘soaring arches’, and the use of still more elaborate figurative descriptions, is not uncommon. My aim in this paper is to explain why metaphor is so prevalent in critical description. Many have taken the prevalence of art-critical metaphors to reveal something important about aesthetic experience and aesthetic properties. My focus is different. I attempt to determine what metaphor (...)
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  5. James Grant, Metaphor and Criticism.
    The prevalence of colourful metaphors and figurative language in critics' descriptions of artworks has long attracted attention. Talk of ‘liquid melodies,’ ‘purple prose,’ ‘soaring arches,’ and the use of still more elaborate figurative descriptions, is not uncommon. My aim in this paper is to explain why metaphor is so prevalent in critical description. Many have taken the prevalence of art-critical metaphors to reveal something important about aesthetic experience and aesthetic properties. My focus is different. I attempt to determine what metaphor (...)
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  6. James Grant (2010). The Dispensability of Metaphor. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3):255-272.
    Many philosophers claim that metaphor is indispensable for various purposes. What I shall call the ‘Indispensability Thesis’ is the view that we use at least some metaphors to think, to express, to communicate, or to discover what cannot be thought, expressed, communicated, or discovered without metaphor. I argue in this paper that support for the Indispensability Thesis is based on several confusions. I criticize arguments presented by Stephen Yablo, Berys Gaut, Richard Boyd, and Elisabeth Camp for the Indispensability Thesis, and (...)
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  7. Oscar Venter, Nathalie N. Brodeur, Leah Nemiroff, Brenna Belland, Ivan J. Dolinsek & James Wa Grant (2006). Threats to Endangered Species in Canada. BioScience 56 (11):903-910.
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  8. Dean E. Allmon & James Grant (1990). Real Estate Sales Agents and the Code of Ethics: A Voice Stress Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (10):807 - 812.
    This study evaluates responses to the Real Estate Ethical Code. Voice Stress Analysis (VSA) is used to evaluate the responses of real estate sales people to ethically-based questions. The process and the responses given enabled the authors to gain insight into pressure-causing ethical situations and to explore new uses of VSA. Some respondents were stressed while following the ethical code guidelines. Others showed no stress about breaking the formal code. The study reaffirms that the presence of formal ethical guidelines does (...)
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