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  1. James H. Moor (forthcoming). Just Consequentialism. Ethics and Information Technology.
     
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  2. James H. Moor (2005). Why We Need Better Ethics for Emerging Technologies. Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):111-119.
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  3. Masahiko Mizutani, James Dorsey & James H. Moor (2004). The Internet and Japanese Conception of Privacy. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (2):121-128.
  4. James H. Moor (2002). Editorial Commentary. Minds and Machines 12 (1):1-1.
  5. James H. Moor (2002). Preface. Minds and Machines 12 (2):157-158.
  6. James H. Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (2002). Introduction to Cyberphilosophy. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 4-10.
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  7. James H. Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (2002). Introduction to Cyberphilosophy. Metaphilosophy 33 (1‐2):4-10.
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  8. Deborah G. Johnson, James H. Moor & Herman T. Tavani (2001). Introduction to Computer Ethics: Philosophy Enquiry. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (1):1-2.
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  9. James H. Moor (2001). The Future of Computer Ethics: You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet! [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):89-91.
    The computer revolution can beusefully divided into three stages, two ofwhich have already occurred: the introductionstage and the permeation stage. We have onlyrecently entered the third and most importantstage – the power stage – in which many ofthe most serious social, political, legal, andethical questions involving informationtechnology will present themselves on a largescale. The present article discusses severalreasons to believe that future developments ininformation technology will make computerethics more vibrant and more important thanever. Computer ethics is here to stay!
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  10. James H. Moor (2001). The Status and Future of the Turing Test. Minds and Machines 11 (1):77-93.
    The standard interpretation of the imitation game is defended over the rival gender interpretation though it is noted that Turing himself proposed several variations of his imitation game. The Turing test is then justified as an inductive test not as an operational definition as commonly suggested. Turing's famous prediction about his test being passed at the 70% level is disconfirmed by the results of the Loebner 2000 contest and the absence of any serious Turing test competitors (...)
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  11. Herman T. Tavani & James H. Moor (2001). Privacy Protection, Control of Information, and Privacy-Enhancing Technologies. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 31 (1):6-11.
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  12. Deborah G. Johnson, James H. Moor & Herman T. Tavani (2000). Computer Ethics: Philosophical Enquiry. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 30 (4):6-9.
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  13. James H. Moor (2000). Special Issues on the 'Turing Test: Past, Present and Future.'. Minds and Machines 10 (4):11.
  14. James H. Moor (2000). Thinking Must Be Computation of the Right Kind. In The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 9: Philosophy of Mind. Charlottesville: Philosophy Doc Ctr. 115-122.
    In this paper I argue for a computational theory of thinking that does not eliminate the mind. In doing so, I will defend computationalism against the arguments of John Searle and James Fetzer, and briefly respond to other common criticisms.
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  15. James H. Moor (2000). The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 9: Philosophy of Mind. Charlottesville: Philosophy Doc Ctr.
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  16. James H. Moor (2000). 2001. The Turing Test: Past, Present and Future (Special Issues). Minds and Machines 10 (4).
  17. James H. Moor (1999). Introduction to the Power of the Net. Ethics and Information Technology 1 (2):93-94.
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  18. James H. Moor (1999). Just Consequentialism and Computing. Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):61-65.
    Computer and information ethics, as well as other fields of applied ethics, need ethical theories which coherently unify deontological and consequentialist aspects of ethical analysis. The proposed theory of just consequentialism emphasizes consequences of policies within the constraints of justice. This makes just consequentialism a practical and theoretically sound approach to ethical problems of computer and information ethics.
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  19. James H. Moor (1999). Special Note. Minds and Machines 9 (1):1-2.
  20. James H. Moor (1999). Using Genetic Information While Protecting the Privacy of the Soul. Ethics and Information Technology 1 (4):257-263.
    Computing plays an important role in genetics (and vice versa).Theoretically, computing provides a conceptual model for thefunction and malfunction of our genetic machinery. Practically,contemporary computers and robots equipped with advancedalgorithms make the revelation of the complete human genomeimminent – computers are about to reveal our genetic soulsfor the first time. Ethically, computers help protect privacyby restricting access in sophisticated ways to genetic information.But the inexorable fact that computers will increasingly collect,analyze, and disseminate abundant amounts of genetic informationmade available through the (...)
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  21. Terrell Ward Bynum & James H. Moor (eds.) (1998). How Computers Are Changing Philosophy. Blackwell.
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  22. James H. Moor (1998). Assessing Artificial Intelligence and its Critics. In T. W. Bynum & Moor J. (eds.), The Digital Phoenix. Cambridge: Blackwell. 213--230.
  23. James H. Moor (1998). Cognition and Explanation–Foreword. Minds and Machines 8 (1):1-5.
  24. James H. Moor (1998). If Aristotle Were a Computing Professional. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (3):13-16.
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  25. James H. Moor (1998). Reason, Relativity, and Responsibility in Computer Ethics. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (1):14-21.
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  26. James H. Moor (1997). Towards a Theory of Privacy in the Information Age. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 27 (3):27-32.
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  27. James H. Moor (1995). Is Ethics Computable? Metaphilosophy 26 (1-2):1-21.
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  28. Robert J. Fogelin & James H. Moor (1991). Lehrer on Incompatible Though Equally Coherent Systems. Philosophical Studies 64 (2):229 - 232.
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  29. James H. Moor (1988). The Pseudorealization Fallacy and the Chinese Room Argument. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Aspects of AI. D.
     
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  30. James H. Moor (1988). Testing Robots for Qualia. In Herbert R. Otto & James A. Tuedio (eds.), Perspectives on Mind. Kluwer.
     
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  31. James H. Moor (1986). Computer-Assisted Instruction and the Guinea Pig Dilemma. Teaching Philosophy 9 (4):351-354.
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  32. James H. Moor (1985). What is Computer Ethics? Metaphilosophy 16 (4):266-275.
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  33. James H. Moor (1982). Split Brains and Atomic Persons. Philosophy of Science 49 (March):91-106.
    Many have claimed that split-brain patients are actually two persons. I maintain that both the traditional separation argument and the more recent sophistication argument for the two persons interpretation are inadequate on conceptual grounds. An autonomy argument is inadequate on empirical grounds. Overall, theoretical and practical consequences weigh heavily in favor of adopting a one person interpretation.
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  34. James H. Moor (1978). Explaining Computer Behavior. Philosophical Studies 34 (October):325-7.
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  35. James H. Moor (1978). Three Myths of Computer Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 29 (3):213-222.
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  36. James H. Moor (1976). An Analysis of Turing's Test. Philosophical Studies 30:249-257.
     
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  37. James H. Moor (1976). An Analysis of the Turing Test. Philosophical Studies 30 (4):249 - 257.
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  38. James H. Moor (1976). Rationality and the Social Sciences. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1976:3 - 11.
    In this paper a conception of rationality is developed which bears on three important issues in the social sciences -- the status of the principle of rationality, the criteria for rational actions, and the nature of rational explanations. It is argued that the principle of rationality should be interpreted as a methodological principle and is valuable only inasmuch as it leads to true hypotheses about human action. Definitions of rational beliefs, rational means, and rational ends are provided. These definitions provide (...)
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  39. James H. Moor (1976). The Cancellation of Symmetrical Contraries and the Principle of Significant Contradictories. Philosophy of Science 43 (4):550-559.
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  40. James H. Moor (1975). Logic and the Keller Plan. Metaphilosophy 6 (3-4):372-375.
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  41. James H. Moor (1973). Book Review:Scientific Knowledge and Its Social Problems Jerome R. Ravetz. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 40 (3):455-.
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