6 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
James Kow [3]James P. Kow [2]James Paul Kow [1]
  1. James Kow (2001). What Philosophy Can Appropriately Say About the Person in the Eucharist. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:301-311.
    The Eucharist poses a challenge for philosophical discourse. Nevertheless, I suggest that we can speak intelligibly about this deepest of mysteries, without detracting from its mysterious evidence. Instead of resorting to the traditional approaches in discussions of the Eucharist, which attempt to explain it in terms of substance metaphysics, I will deploy a speech act theory, not in order to comprehend, but rather to hold open a space for this mystery to become present in our natural and philosophical lives. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. James Kow (1997). New Perspectives on Hegel's Philosophy of Religion. The Owl of Minerva 28 (2):233-240.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. James Paul Kow (1994). Louis Dupre, Passage to Modernity Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (4):251-254.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. James Kow (1993). Ethics, Politics, and Ontology. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 67:97-106.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. James P. Kow (1993). Geist. Philosophy and Theology 7 (3):249-287.
    My discussion of Hegel focuses direcrly upon the process of interiority at the centre of his thought. This process captures certain fundamental classical philosophical and religious themes in its gamut: knowledge, love, the Incarnation, and the Trinity. The central anti-reductionistic principle around which my examination of interioriry is developed is Hegel’s contention that the low or imperfect must be seen in the light of the high or perfect. I discriminate between the different ontological forms of this principle in the philosophies (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. James P. Kow (1993). Hegel, Kolb, and Flay. International Philosophical Quarterly 33 (2):203-218.
    To be intelligible, the finite order of human experience, for Hegel, requires infinite absolute spirit. Flay and Kolb overlook this infinite in Hegel's thought. Notwithstanding their contextualist hints in interpreting Hegel they regard Hegel as even more of a foundationalist than the epistemological foundationalists. But the notion of ground in Hegel's Logic refutes this. Hegel's systemic holism is grounded in the prospective completed infinity of spirit beyond either Foundationalism or Anti-Foundationalism. In the absence of infinite spirit we are consigned to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation