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  1. Jay Baruch, Jessica Wilen Berg, Jeffrey T. Berger, Nancy Berlinger, James L. Bernat, J. Andrew Billings, Larry R. Churchill, Richard Payne, Herbert J. Bonifacio & Annie Janvier (2010). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 40 of the Hastings Center Report, Covering All Feature Material From 2010. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 40 (2010) and May Be Purchased From the Cir-Culation Department, The Hastings Center, 21 Malcolm Gordon Road, Garrison, NY 10524; Tel.:(845) 424-4040; Fax:(845) 424-4545; E-Mail: Publications@ Thehastingscenter. Org. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 40.
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  2.  15
    James L. Bernat (2014). Whither Brain Death? American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):3-8.
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  3.  55
    Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy (2008). Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):3 – 12.
    The application of neuroimaging technology to the study of the injured brain has transformed how neuroscientists understand disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states, and deepened our understanding of mechanisms of recovery. This scientific progress, and its potential clinical translation, provides an opportunity for ethical reflection. It was against this scientific backdrop that we convened a conference of leading investigators in neuroimaging, disorders of consciousness and neuroethics. Our goal was to develop an ethical frame to move (...)
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  4.  63
    James L. Bernat (2006). The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
    “Brain death,” the determination of human death by showing the irreversible loss of all clinical functions of the brain, has become a worldwide practice. A biophilosophical account of brain death requires four sequential tasks: agreeing on the paradigm of death, a set of preconditions that frame the discussion; determining the definition of death by making explicit the consensual concept of death; determining the criterion of death that proves the definition has been fulfilled by being both necessary and sufficient for death; (...)
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  5.  9
    James L. Bernat (1998). A Defense of the Whole‐Brain Concept of Death. Hastings Center Report 28 (2):14-23.
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  6.  6
    James L. Bernat (2013). On Noncongruence Between the Concept and Determination of Death. Hastings Center Report 43 (6):25-33.
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  7.  7
    James L. Bernat (2006). Are Organ Donors After Cardiac Death Really Dead? Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (2):122.
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  8. James L. Bernat (2002). The Biophilosophical Basis of Whole-Brain Death. Soc Philos Policy 19 (2):324-42.
    Notwithstanding these wise pronouncements, my project here is to characterize the biological phenomenon of death of the higher animal species, such as vertebrates. My claim is that the formulation of “whole- brain death ” provides the most congruent map for our correct understanding of the concept of death. This essay builds upon the foundation my colleagues and I have laid since 1981 to characterize the concept of death and refine when this event occurs. Although our society's well-accepted program of multiple (...)
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  9.  37
    James L. Bernat (2006). Chronic Disorders of Consciousness. Lancet 367 (9517):1181-1192.
  10.  5
    James L. Bernat (2015). Harmonizing Standards for Death Determination in DCDD. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):10-12.
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  11. James L. Bernat (2006). The Concept and Practice of Brain Death. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier
  12.  16
    James L. Bernat (1992). How Much of the Brain Must Die in Brain Death? Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (1):21.
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  13. James L. Bernat (2006). The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
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  14.  6
    James L. Bernat (2004). On Irreversibility as a Prerequisite for Brain Death Determination. In C. Machado & D. E. Shewmon (eds.), Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness. Plenum 161--167.
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  15.  56
    James L. Bernat (2002). Questions Remaining About the Minimally Conscious State. Neurology 58 (3):337-338.
  16.  5
    James L. Bernat, Charles M. Culver & Bernard Gert (1982). Defining Death in Theory and Practice. Hastings Center Report 12 (1):5-9.
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  17. James L. Bernat (2002). The Biophilosophical Basis of Whole-Brain Death. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):324-342.
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  18.  12
    James L. Bernat (2010). The Debate Over Death Determination in DCD. Hastings Center Report 40 (3):3-3.
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  19.  5
    Anne Laure Dalle Ave, David Shaw & James L. Bernat (forthcoming). An Analysis of Heart Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death. Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2015-103224.
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  20.  1
    Bernard Gert, James L. Bernat & R. Peter Mogielnicki (1994). Distinguishing Between Patients' Refusals and Requests. Hastings Center Report 24 (4):13-15.
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  21.  7
    James L. Bernat (1992). The Boundaries of the Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (3):176.
  22.  7
    James L. Bernat (2013). Constitutes Human Death. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons 25--377.
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  23.  21
    Catherine Rodrigue, Richard J. Riopelle, James L. Bernat & Eric Racine (2013). Perspectives and Experience of Healthcare Professionals on Diagnosis, Prognosis, and End-of-Life Decision Making in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness. Neuroethics 6 (1):25-36.
    In the care of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), some ethical difficulties stem from the challenges of accurate diagnosis and the uncertainty of prognosis. Current neuroimaging research on these disorders could eventually improve the accuracy of diagnoses and prognoses and therefore change the context of end-of-life decision making. However, the perspective of healthcare professionals on these disorders remains poorly understood and may constitute an obstacle to the integration of research. We conducted a qualitative study involving healthcare professionals from an (...)
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  24.  3
    James L. Bernat (1992). The Veterans Affairs National Center for Clinical Ethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 2 (4):385-388.
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  25.  2
    Catherine Rodrigue, Richard Riopelle, James L. Bernat & Eric Racine (2013). How Contextual and Relational Aspects Shape the Perspective of Healthcare Providers on Decision Making for Patients With Disorders of Consciousness: A Qualitative Interview Study. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (3):261-273.
  26.  2
    James L. Bernat (2013). Determining Death in Uncontrolled DCDD Organ Donors. Hastings Center Report 43 (1):30-33.
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  27. David Barnard, Celia Berdes, James L. Bernat, Linda Emanuel, Robert Fogerty, Linda Ganzini, Elizabeth R. Goy, David J. Mayo, John Paris, Michael D. Schreiber, J. David Velleman & Mark R. Wicclair (2005). Death in the Clinic. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Death in the Clinic fills a gap in contemporary medical education by explicitly addressing the concrete clinical realities about death with which practitioners, patients, and their families continue to wrestle. Visit our website for sample chapters!
     
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  28. James L. Bernat (2013). Reply to Chiong. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons 25--397.
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  29. Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy (2008). Participants of the Working Meeting on Ethics, Neuroimaging and Limited States of Consciousness. Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda. Am J Bioethics 8 (9):3-12.
     
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