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  1. Donald W. Light & James Lindemann Nelson (forthcoming). Moral Teachings From the Social Sciences. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  2. James Lindemann Nelson (forthcoming). Another Voice: Love's Burdens. Hastings Center Report.
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  3. Hilde Lindemann & James Lindemann Nelson (2014). The Surrogate's Authority. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (2):161-168.
    The authority of surrogates—often close family members—to make treatment decisions for previously capacitated patients is said to come from their knowledge of the patient, which they are to draw on as they exercise substituted judgment on the patient’s behalf. However, proxy accuracy studies call this authority into question, hence the Patient Preference Predictor (PPP). We identify two problems with contemporary understandings of the surrogate’s role. The first is with the assumption that knowledge of the patient entails knowledge of what the (...)
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  4. James Lindemann Nelson (2014). Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on turning (...)
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  5. James Lindemann Nelson (2013). Just Caring for the Elderly: A Utopian Fantasy? Thoughts Prompted by Martha Holstein. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):36-40.
    Midway in Martha Holstein’s article, these words occur: “[P]eople [should] get the help they need, when they need it, in the way that they would like to receive it, without exploiting family members or imperiling their dignity or self-respect” (24). In an essay that brims over with worrisome news, that this seemingly anodyne sentence appears in the section devoted to utopian thinking is perhaps the most dispiriting thought it conveys. Not that there isn’t keen competition for the role. Holstein reminds (...)
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  6. James Lindemann Nelson (2013). “Yet the Body Is His Book”: Plastinated Bodies and the Book of Common Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 43 (3):46-47.
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  7. James Lindemann Nelson (2012). Quality of Care: A Preface. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):237-242.
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  8. James Lindemann Nelson (2012). Still Quiet After All These Years. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (3):249-259.
    Some 14 years ago, I published an article in which I identified a prime site for bioethicists to ply their trade: medical responses to requests for hormonal and surgical interventions aimed at facilitating transgendered people’s transition to their desired genders. Deep issues about the impact of biotechnologies and health care practices on central aspects of our conceptual system, I argued, were raised by how doctors understood and responded to people seeking medical assistance in changing their gender, and there were obviously (...)
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  9. James Lindemann Nelson (2011). Hurts, Insults and Stigmas: A Comment on Murphy. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):66-67.
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  10. James Lindemann Nelson (2011). Internal Organs, Integral Selves, and Good Communities: Opt-Out Organ Procurement Policies and the 'Separateness of Persons'. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (5):289-300.
    Most people accept that if they can save someone from death at very little cost to themselves, they must do so; call this the ‘duty of easy rescue.’ At least for many such people, an instance of this duty is to allow their vital organs to be used for transplantation. Accordingly, ‘opt-out’ organ procurement policies, based on a powerfully motivated responsibility to render costless or very low-cost lifesaving aid, would seem presumptively permissible. Counterarguments abound. Here I consider, in particular, objections (...)
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  11. James Lindemann Nelson (2011). Progress in Bioethics: Science, Policy, and Politics (Review). International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):237-241.
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  12. James Lindemann Nelson (2011). Progress in Bioethics: Science, Policy, and Politics. Edited by Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):237-241.
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  13. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). Book Reviews: Morality and Our Complicated Form of Life: Feminist Wittgensteinian Metaethics. By Peg O'Connor. [REVIEW] Hypatia 25 (1):242-244.
  14. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). Donation by Default? Examining Feminist Reservations About Opt-Out Organ Procurement. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1):23-42.
    During 2006, a total of 130,527 Americans spent time on organ waiting lists; 7,191 of them died waiting. According to the U.S. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, 104,778 people are awaiting organs as this is being written (www.optn.org/data/; accessed November 4, 2009); every ninety minutes or so, one of them will die.In Spain, however, waiting list time is much shorter, and accordingly, very few die for the want of an organ; roughly thirty-five people per million provide organs in Spain upon (...)
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  15. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). How Catherine Does Go On: Northanger Abbey and Moral Thought. Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 188-200.
    A certain pupil with the vaguely Kafkaesque name B has mastered the series of natural numbers. B's new task is to learn how to write down other series of cardinal numbers and right now, we're working on the series "+2." After a bit, B seems to catch on, but we are unusually thorough teachers and keep him at it. Things are going just fine until he reaches 1000. Then, quite confounding us, he writes 1004, 1008, 1012."We say to him: 'Look (...)
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  16. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). Semantic Externalism: A Rough Sketch and a Gesture at Motivation The 1960s and 70s Saw the Development of a Picture of Reference in Which the Link Between the Speaker and the Spoken of Was Provided Not, or Not Solely, by Beliefs Entertained by the Speaker but by Causal, Historical, and Social Relationships Extending Among the Speaker and Other Members Of. [REVIEW] In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  17. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). Trusting Families: Responding to Mary Ann Meeker," Responsive Care Management: Family Decision Makers in Advanced Cancer". Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (2):123-127.
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  18. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Alzheimer's Disease and Socially Extended Mentation. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):462-474.
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  19. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Beyond Moral Judgment. By Alice Crary. Hypatia 24 (1):181-185.
  20. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Berger on Burdens. Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (2):162.
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  21. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Dealing Death and Retrieving Organs. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):285-291.
    It has recently been argued by Miller and Truog (2008) that, while procuring vital organs from transplant donors is typically the cause of their deaths, this violation of the requirement that donors be dead prior to the removal of their organs is not a cause for moral concern. In general terms, I endorse this heterodox conclusion, but for different and, as I think, more powerful reasons. I end by arguing that, even if it is agreed that retrieval of vital organs (...)
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  22. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Hypotheticals, Analogies, Death's Harms, and Organ Procurement. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):14-16.
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  23. Hilde Lindemann & James Lindemann Nelson (2008). The Romance of the Family. Hastings Center Report 38 (4):19-21.
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  24. James Lindemann Nelson (2008). Respecting Boundaries, Disparaging Values. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):33 – 34.
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  25. James Lindemann Nelson (2007). How Doctors Think: Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (4):633-636.
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  26. James Lindemann Nelson (2007). Medicine and the Market: Equity Vs. Choice (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):474-478.
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  27. James Lindemann Nelson (2007). Synecdoche and Stigma. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (04):475-.
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  28. James Lindemann Nelson (2007). Testing, Terminating, and Discriminating. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (04):462-.
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  29. James Lindemann Nelson (2007). Illusions About Persons. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):65-66.
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  30. James Lindemann Nelson (2007). Philosophizing in a Dissonant Key. Hypatia 22 (3):223-233.
  31. James Lindemann Nelson (2007). Trusting Bioethicists. In Lisa A. Eckenwiler & Felicia Cohn (eds.), The Ethics of Bioethics: Mapping the Moral Landscape. Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  32. James Lindemann Nelson (2006). Field Notes. Hastings Center Report 36 (1):c2-c2.
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  33. James Lindemann Nelson (2005). Trust and Transplants. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):26 – 28.
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  34. James Lindemann Nelson (2005). The Baroness's Committee and the President's Council: Ambition and Alienation in Public Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (3):251-267.
    : The President's Council on Bioethics has tried to make a distinctive contribution to the methodology of such public bodies in developing what it has styled a "richer bioethics." The Council's procedure contrasts with more modest methods of public bioethical deliberation employed by the United Kingdom's Warnock Committee. The practices of both bodies are held up against a backdrop of concerns about moral and political alienation, prompted by the limitations of moral reasoning and by moral dissent from state policy under (...)
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  35. James Lindemann Nelson (2005). The Opacity of Consent: Richard Hull on Informed Consent as Patient Duty. In Elizabeth D. Boepple (ed.), Sui Generis: Essays Presented to Richard Thompson Hull on the Occasion of His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Authorhouse.
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  36. Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  37. James Lindemann Nelson (2004). Love's Burdens. Hastings Center Report 34 (5):3.
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  38. James Lindemann Nelson (2004). The Social Situation of Sincerity: Austen's Emma and Lovibond's Ethical Formation. In Peggy DesAutels & Margaret Urban Walker (eds.), Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.
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  39. James Lindemann Nelson (2004). Utility, Fairness, and What Really Matters in Organ Provision. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):27 – 29.
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  40. James Lindemann Nelson & Joel Frader (2004). Brain Trauma and Surrogate Decision Making: Dogmas, Challenges, and Response. Journal of Clinical Ethics 15 (4):264-276.
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  41. James Lindemann Nelson (2003). Harming the Dead and Saving the Living. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):13 – 15.
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  42. James Lindemann Nelson (2002). Carl Schneider's the Practice of Autonomy: A Précis. Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (1):54.
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  43. James Lindemann Nelson (2002). Ethical Formation. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):556-558.
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  44. James Lindemann Nelson (2001). Constructing Feelings: Jane Austen and Naomi Scheman on the Moral Role of Emotions. In Peggy DesAutels & JoAnne Waugh (eds.), Feminists Doing Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc.
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  45. James Lindemann Nelson (2001). Knowledge, Authority and Identity: A Prolegomenon to an Epistemology of the Clinic. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (2):107-122.
    Disputes about theory in bioethics almost invariablyrevolve around different understandings of morality or practicalreasoning; I here suggest that the field would do well to becomemore explicitly contentious about knowledge, and start the taskof putting together a clinical epistemology. By way of providingsome motivation for such a discussion, I consider two cases ofresistance to shifts in clinical practice that are, by and large,not ethically controversial, highlighting how differentconceptions of epistemic authority may contribute to clinicians'unwillingness to adopt these changes, and sketching out (...)
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  46. James Lindemann Nelson (2001). Marcel S. Lieberman: Commitment, Value and Moral Realism. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (1):131-135.
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  47. James Lindemann Nelson (2001). What Do We Know When We Know How to Go On? Hastings Center Report 31 (4):50-51.
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  48. James Lindemann Nelson & Hilde Lindemann Nelson (2001). From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice (Review). American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):70-72.
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  49. Sandra Lee Bartky, Daniel Callahan, Joan C. Callahan, Peggy DesAutels, Robin Fiore, Frida Kerner Furman, Martha Holstein, Diana Tietjens Meyers, Hilde Lindemann Nelson, James Lindemann Nelson, Sara Ruddick, Anita Silvers, Joan Tronto, Margaret Urban Walker & Susan Wendell (2000). Mother Time: Women, Aging, and Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection of essays opens up a novel area of inquiry: the ethical dimension of women's experiences of ageing.
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  50. Michele Carter, H. Phillips Hamlin, Jennifer Heyl, Glenn C. Graber, James Lindemann Nelson & Linda A. Rankin (2000). Forming Professional Bioethicists: The Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (03):418-423.
    As a way of contributing to bioethics' understanding of itself, and, more particularly, to invigorate conversation about how we can best educate future colleagues, we present here a sketch of the quarter-century-old graduate concentration in medical ethics housed in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Our hope is to incite other programs to share their histories, strategies, problems, and aspirations, so as to help the field as a whole get a clearer sense of how we are (...)
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