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James M. Jacobs [7]James Michael Jacobs [1]
  1. James M. Jacobs (2014). The Practice of Religion in Post-Secular Society. International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (1):5-23.
    This paper considers recent arguments from Jürgen Habermas and Charles Taylor that argue that even secular societies ought to tolerate religion for its practical benefits. Then, taking inspiration from Thomas Aquinas, I critique their positions as misconstruing the nature of religion in two fundamental ways. First, we must distinguish generic religion as a natural virtue from diverse species of faith that go beyond the duty to render homage to the First Cause. It will be seen that, generically, religion is integral (...)
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  2. James M. Jacobs (2013). Can Animals Be Moral? By Mark Rowlands; and Animals and the Limits of Postmodernism. By Gary Steiner. International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (4):471-474.
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  3. James M. Jacobs (2012). How to Prove There is a God: Mortimer J. Adler's Writings and Thoughts About God, Ed. Ken Dzugan. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (3):381-383.
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  4. James M. Jacobs (2010). The Inherent Limitations on Human Freedom. Logos 13 (1):107-131.
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  5. James M. Jacobs (2007). On the Difference Between Social Justice and Christian Charity. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):419-438.
    The notion of justice implies that what is given is owed to the recipient; charity, on the other hand, acknowledges the reality of a free gift that is not owed to the recipient. This difference is obscured in contemporary liberal societies where, because of the absence of transcendent metaphysical commitments, the demandsof social justice replace charity. A Thomistic analysis, however, recognizes a metaphysical order as the basis for justice. This order limits the sphere of justice and so allows for acts (...)
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  6. James M. Jacobs (2007). The Precepts of the Decalogue and the Problem of Self-Evidence. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):399-415.
    There is a dilemma at the heart of the moral life, in that we often appeal to the Decalogue as being the basis of a common morality, yet it is impossible to justify these precepts as self-evident. I resolve this dilemma in light of Aquinas’s analysis of the relation between the self-evident precepts of the natural law and the Decalogue. The self-evident precepts follow directly from human nature. The precepts of the Decalogue indicate how those goods are to be pursued (...)
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  7. James M. Jacobs (2004). The Relevance of Aristotle's Notion of Equity for the Contemporary Abortion Debate. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:119-132.
    In this paper I explore Aristotle’s idea of epikeia, or equity, in relation to the contemporary abortion debate. Equity is the rule of justice that insists we gobeyond the letter of the law in those cases in which following it would be harmful. One consequence of this is that we do not need to create exceptionless laws,since laws can admit exceptions for the sake of a higher good. I argue that this arrangement appears to be a reasonable way to move (...)
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