1. James M. King (2011). Hannah Arendt's Mythology: The Political Nature of History and Its Tales of Antiheroes. The European Legacy 16 (1):27-38.
    Current scholarship has focused on analyzing how Arendt's storytelling corresponds to her political arguments. In following up this discussion, I offer a closer examination of the unusual myth Arendt uses to explain the condition of the modern age, a myth she refers to as the ?political nature of history.? I employ literary terms along with the standard vocabulary of political theory in shaping this reading of Arendt. Following Robert C. Pirro, I also consider Arendt's story as a tragedy, but in (...)
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  2. James M. King (2008). Lying. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (1):125-132.
    The following essay involves a discussion of four theories about lying and their application to a specific circumstance, the Nazi-Jew situation, as found in Kant, Aquinas, Pruss, and Guervin. By examining their thoughts on this particular situation, we may draw out, by the use of “right reason,” ways to handle everyday situations that causes us to face the tragic choice between two goods that lying presents. The argument is that, if approached in a certain way, the tragic choice lying presents (...)
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  3. James M. King & Verne C. Cox (1976). Measurement of Estradiol-Induced Wheel Running with Brief Time Samples. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 8 (1):47-48.
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