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James Martel [7]James R. Martel [7]
  1. James R. Martel (2012). Divine Violence: Walter Benjamin and the Eschatology of Sovereignty. Routledge.
    Introduction: divine violence and political fetishism -- The political theology of sovereignty -- In the maw of sovereignty -- Benjamin's dissipated eschatology -- Waiting for justice -- Forgiveness, judgment and sovereign decision -- The Hebrew republic -- Conclusion : the anarchist hypothesis.
     
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  2. James Martel (2011). Machiavelli's Public Conspiracies. Mediatropes 2 (1):60-83.
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  3. James Martel (2011). Taking Benjamin Seriously as a Political Thinker. Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (4):297-308.
    Benjamin has long been known for his literary and aesthetic theory but political theorists, as well as other scholars who are interested in questions of politics, tend to downplay (or simply not notice) his contributions to an actionable rhetorical-political discourse. In terms of a politics that speaks directly to the ongoing crisis of global capitalism, existing power arrangements, and the effective depoliticization of the vast majority of people living under such conditions (very much including advanced liberal capitalist democracies such as (...)
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  4. Jodi Dean, James Martel & Davide Panagia (2010). Introduction. Theory and Event 13 (1).
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  5. James R. Martel (2010). Hobbes's "Thinking-Bodies". Theory and Event 13 (1).
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  6. James Martel (2009). The Messiah Who Comes and Goes: Franz Kafka on Redemption, Conspiracy and Community. Theory and Event 12 (3).
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  7. James Martel (2008). Amo: Volo Ut Sis: Love, Willing and Arendt's Reluctant Embrace of Sovereignty. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (3):287-313.
    Although critical of what she calls the `antipolitical' forces of love and sovereignty, Arendt reluctantly embraces these aspects as the basis of politics itself. I explain this paradox by arguing that Arendt seeks to balance Greek and Roman notions of freedom with modern conceptions of the will. The solipsistic will poses a threat to politics (it is the source of sovereignty itself). Yet the will is a fact of modern life and cannot be ignored. I argue that despite her embrace (...)
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  8. James R. Martel (2005). Strong Sovereign, Weak Messiah: Thomas Hobbes on Scriptural Interpretation, Rhetoric, and the Holy Spirit. Theory and Event 7 (4).
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  9. James Martel (2004). The Role of Emotion in Political Life. Political Theory 32 (1):116-120.
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  10. James R. Martel (2000). The Radical Promise of Thomas Hobbes: The Road Not Taken in Liberal Theory. Theory and Event 4 (2).
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