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  1.  22
    James A. McGilvray (1999). Chomsky: Language, Mind, and Politics. Polity Press.
    In this work, McGilvray explains Noam Chomsky's rationalist view of human nature.
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  2.  45
    James A. McGilvray (1994). Constant Colors in the Head. Synthese 100 (2):197-239.
    I defend a version of color subjectivism — that colors are sortals for certain neural events — by arguing against a sophisticated form of color objectivism and by showing how a subjectivist can legitimately explain the phenomenal fact that colors seem to be properties of external objects.
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  3.  2
    James McGilvray (2014). Review: The Reference Book. [REVIEW] Mind and Language 29 (4):490-498.
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  4.  76
    James A. McGilvray (1998). Meanings Are Syntactically Individuated and Found in the Head. Mind and Language 13 (2):225-280.
    Expanding on some of Chomsky’s recently expressed views of meaning in a way that is consistent with his long-held rationalist conception of mind, I show how syntax, broadly conceived, could individuate meanings and provide a science of meanings inside the head. Interpretation becomes a pragmatic matter, although a rationalist account of mind shows how internal meanings guide interpretation and, more generally, language use. In this view of meanings, interpretation, and mind, semantics as usually understood disappears.
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  5. James A. McGilvray (2006). On the Innateness of Language. In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing 97--112.
  6.  26
    James A. McGilvray (ed.) (2005). The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky. Cambridge University Press.
    A comprehensive and accessible companion to the various aspects of Noam Chomsky's work.
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  7.  28
    James A. McGilvray (1983). To Color. Synthese 54 (January):37-70.
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  8.  9
    James McGilvray (2005). 10 Meaning and Creativity. In James A. McGilvray (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky. Cambridge University Press 204.
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  9.  10
    James McGilvray (2003). Common Sense Concepts. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):275-288.
    Descartes was right: commonsense concepts are acquired, not learned; scientific concepts are learned, not acquired.
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  10.  1
    James A. McGilvray (1992). Colors Really Are Only in the Head. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):48-49.
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  11.  7
    James A. McGilvray (1991). Book Review:Color for Philosophers C. L. Hardin. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 58 (2):329-.
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  12.  9
    James A. McGilvray (1977). Can Travis' “Generative Theory of Illocutions” Be Generative? Dialogue 16 (4):733-742.
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  13.  20
    James A. McGilvray (2001). The Location Problem Reconsidered: A Reply to Ross. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):63-73.
  14.  14
    James A. McGilvray (1979). A Defense of Physical Becoming. Erkenntnis 14 (3):275 - 299.
    This paper defends physical becoming against Grünbaum's attack, by constructing three arguments in favor of physical becoming. Of the three, I rely primarily on an argument from the philosophy of language, and especially on the principle that tensed discourse involves presuppositions and commitments that Grünbaum's account of becoming cannot handle. I show that Grünbaum's analysis of becoming can provide only a very implausible reconstruction of the temporal coordination of speakers engaged in discourse.
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  15.  14
    James A. McGilvray (1983). Pure Process(Es)? Philosophical Studies 43 (2):243 - 251.
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  16.  8
    James A. McGilvray (1979). Critical Notice of Noam Chomsky, Reflections on Language. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):519-544.
  17. James McGilvray (2002). MOPs: The Science of Concepts. In Wolfram Hinzen & Hans Rott (eds.), Belief and Meaning: Essays at the Interface. Deutsche Bibliothek der Wissenschaften 73--103.
     
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  18.  10
    James McGilvray (1973). The Functions of Tenses. Noûs 7 (2):164-178.
  19.  11
    James A. McGilvray (1976). Becoming: A Modest Proposal. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 30 (3):161 - 170.
    In this paper I attempt a new approach to an old technical term: becoming. I show how the theory that becoming is coming-to-be could be supported by a semantic derivation of the nominalization becoming from its verbal counterpart, by investigating the properties of the present progressive constructions in which becoming as a verbal appears. My theory denies that dates, or qualitative change, play an essential role in the analysis of becoming.
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  20.  5
    James Mcgilvray (1996). Indexing Truths: A Critical Notice of John Campbell's Past, Space, and Self. Mind and Language 11 (4):433-446.
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  21. Jessie Charles King & James A. Mcgilvray (1973). Political and Social Philosophy Traditional and Contemporary Readings.
     
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  22. James McGilvray (2013). Chomsky: Language, Mind and Politics. Polity.
    Noam Chomsky has made major contributions to three fields: political history and analysis, linguistics, and the philosophies of mind, language, and human nature. In this thoroughly revised and updated volume, James McGilvray provides a critical introduction to Chomsky's work in these three key areas and assesses their continuing importance and relevance for today. In an incisive and comprehensive analysis, McGilvray argues that Chomsky’s work can be seen as a unified intellectual project. He shows how Chomsky adapts the tools of natural (...)
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  23. James McGilvray (2013). Chomsky: Language, Mind and Politics. Polity.
    Noam Chomsky has made major contributions to three fields: political history and analysis, linguistics, and the philosophies of mind, language, and human nature. In this thoroughly revised and updated volume, James McGilvray provides a critical introduction to Chomsky's work in these three key areas and assesses their continuing importance and relevance for today. In an incisive and comprehensive analysis, McGilvray argues that Chomsky’s work can be seen as a unified intellectual project. He shows how Chomsky adapts the tools of natural (...)
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  24. James McGilvray (2013). Chomsky: Language, Mind and Politics. Polity.
    Noam Chomsky has made major contributions to three fields: political history and analysis, linguistics, and the philosophies of mind, language, and human nature. In this thoroughly revised and updated volume, James McGilvray provides a critical introduction to Chomsky's work in these three key areas and assesses their continuing importance and relevance for today. In an incisive and comprehensive analysis, McGilvray argues that Chomsky’s work can be seen as a unified intellectual project. He shows how Chomsky adapts the tools of natural (...)
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  25. James McGilvray (2013). Chomsky: Language, Mind and Politics. Polity.
    Noam Chomsky has made major contributions to three fields: political history and analysis, linguistics, and the philosophies of mind, language, and human nature. In this thoroughly revised and updated volume, James McGilvray provides a critical introduction to Chomsky's work in these three key areas and assesses their continuing importance and relevance for today. In an incisive and comprehensive analysis, McGilvray argues that Chomsky’s work can be seen as a unified intellectual project. He shows how Chomsky adapts the tools of natural (...)
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  26. James McGilvray (2013). Chomsky: Language, Mind and Politics. Polity.
    Noam Chomsky has made major contributions to three fields: political history and analysis, linguistics, and the philosophies of mind, language, and human nature. In this thoroughly revised and updated volume, James McGilvray provides a critical introduction to Chomsky's work in these three key areas and assesses their continuing importance and relevance for today. In an incisive and comprehensive analysis, McGilvray argues that Chomsky’s work can be seen as a unified intellectual project. He shows how Chomsky adapts the tools of natural (...)
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  27. James McGilvray (1986). Zeno Vender, The Matter of Mind Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (5):250-254.
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  28. James Mcgilvray (1986). Zeno Vender, The Matter of Minds. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 6:250-254.
     
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