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James H. Moor [41]James Moor [25]
  1. Frank Dilley, David A. Crocker, Edwin Curley, Rosalind Ladd, Bill Lawson, James Moor, Leslie Francis, Ofelia Schutte, James W. Nickel & Claudia Card (forthcoming). Reports of APA Committees. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association.
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  2. Bill E. Lawson, Peter H. Hare, James Moor, Leslie Francis, Andrew Reck, Jaakko Hintikka, Stefan Bernard Baumrin, Leonard M. Fleck, Louisa Moon & Betsy Newell Decyk (forthcoming). Reports of APA Committees. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association.
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  3. Stephanie Lewis, Rosalind Ladd, David A. Crocker, Edwin Curley, Frank Dilley, Robert Gooding-Williams, Terry Bynum, James Moor, Leslie Francis & Ofelia Schutte (forthcoming). Reports of APA Committees. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association.
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  4. George R. Lucas, Jaakko Hintikka, Myles Brand, Anne Waters, Xinyan Jiang, Bernard Boxill, James Moor, Michael Corrado, Stefan Bernard Baumrin & Claudia Card (forthcoming). Reports of APA Committees: Committee on Career Opportunities. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association.
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  5. James Moor (forthcoming). Issues: Democracy and Policy. Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  6. James Moor (forthcoming). Issues: Health and Environment. Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  7. James H. Moor (forthcoming). Just Consequentialism. Ethics and Information Technology.
     
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  8. Kevin Warwick, Huma Shah & James Moor (2013). Some Implications of a Sample of Practical Turing Tests. Minds and Machines 23 (2):163-177.
    A series of imitation games involving 3-participant (simultaneous comparison of two hidden entities) and 2-participant (direct interrogation of a hidden entity) were conducted at Bletchley Park on the 100th anniversary of Alan Turing’s birth: 23 June 2012. From the ongoing analysis of over 150 games involving (expert and non-expert, males and females, adults and child) judges, machines and hidden humans (foils for the machines), we present six particular conversations that took place between human judges and a hidden entity that produced (...)
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  9. Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin, James Moor & John Weckert (2010). Ethics of Human Enhancement: 25 Questions & Answers. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 4 (1).
    This paper presents the principal findings from a three-year research project funded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) on ethics of human enhancement technologies. To help untangle this ongoing debate, we have organized the discussion as a list of questions and answers, starting with background issues and moving to specific concerns, including: freedom & autonomy, health & safety, fairness & equity, societal disruption, and human dignity. Each question-and answer pair is largely self-contained, allowing the reader to skip to those (...)
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  10. Don Gotterbarn & James Moor (2009). Virtual Decisions: Video Game Ethics, Just Consequentialism, and Ethics on the Fly. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 39 (3):27-42.
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  11. James Moor (2009). Four Kinds of Ethical Robots. Philosophy Now 72:12-14.
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  12. Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin, James Moor, John Weckert & Mihail C. Roco (2007). Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. Wiley.
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  13. James Moor (2006). The Precautionary Principle in Nanotechnology. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):191-204.
    The precautionary principle (PP) is thought by many to be a useful strategy for action and by many others useless at best and dangerous at worst. We argue that it is a coherent and useful principle. We first clarify the principle and then defend it against a number of common criticisms. Three examples from nanotechnology are used; nanoparticles and possible health and environmental problems, grey goo and the potential for catastrophe, and privacy risks generated by nanoelectronics.
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  14. James H. Moor (2005). Why We Need Better Ethics for Emerging Technologies. Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):111-119.
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  15. Terry Bynum, Robert Cavalier, James Moor, David Rosenthal & Bill Uzgalis (2004). Daniel Dennett and the Computational Turn. Minds and Machines 14:281-282.
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  16. Masahiko Mizutani, James Dorsey & James H. Moor (2004). The Internet and Japanese Conception of Privacy. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (2):121-128.
  17. James Moor & John Weckert (2004). Nanoethics: Assessing the Nanoscale From an Ethical Point of View. In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios. 301--310.
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  18. James H. Moor (2002). Editorial Commentary. Minds and Machines 12 (1):1-1.
  19. James H. Moor (2002). Preface. Minds and Machines 12 (2):157-158.
  20. James H. Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (2002). Introduction to Cyberphilosophy. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 4-10.
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  21. James H. Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (2002). Introduction to Cyberphilosophy. Metaphilosophy 33 (1‐2):4-10.
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  22. James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.) (2002). Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub..
    This cutting edge volume provides an overview of the dynamic new field of cyberphilosophy – the intersection of philosophy and computing.
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  23. Deborah G. Johnson, James H. Moor & Herman T. Tavani (2001). Introduction to Computer Ethics: Philosophy Enquiry. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (1):1-2.
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  24. James H. Moor (2001). The Future of Computer Ethics: You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet! [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):89-91.
    The computer revolution can beusefully divided into three stages, two ofwhich have already occurred: the introductionstage and the permeation stage. We have onlyrecently entered the third and most importantstage – the power stage – in which many ofthe most serious social, political, legal, andethical questions involving informationtechnology will present themselves on a largescale. The present article discusses severalreasons to believe that future developments ininformation technology will make computerethics more vibrant and more important thanever. Computer ethics is here to stay!
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  25. James H. Moor (2001). The Status and Future of the Turing Test. Minds and Machines 11 (1):77-93.
    The standard interpretation of the imitation game is defended over the rival gender interpretation though it is noted that Turing himself proposed several variations of his imitation game. The Turing test is then justified as an inductive test not as an operational definition as commonly suggested. Turing's famous prediction about his test being passed at the 70% level is disconfirmed by the results of the Loebner 2000 contest and the absence of any serious Turing test competitors (...)
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  26. Herman T. Tavani & James H. Moor (2001). Privacy Protection, Control of Information, and Privacy-Enhancing Technologies. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 31 (1):6-11.
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  27. Deborah G. Johnson, James H. Moor & Herman T. Tavani (2000). Computer Ethics: Philosophical Enquiry. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 30 (4):6-9.
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  28. James H. Moor (2000). Special Issues on the 'Turing Test: Past, Present and Future.'. Minds and Machines 10 (4):11.
  29. James H. Moor (2000). Thinking Must Be Computation of the Right Kind. In The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 9: Philosophy of Mind. Charlottesville: Philosophy Doc Ctr. 115-122.
    In this paper I argue for a computational theory of thinking that does not eliminate the mind. In doing so, I will defend computationalism against the arguments of John Searle and James Fetzer, and briefly respond to other common criticisms.
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  30. James H. Moor (2000). The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 9: Philosophy of Mind. Charlottesville: Philosophy Doc Ctr.
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  31. James H. Moor (2000). 2001. The Turing Test: Past, Present and Future (Special Issues). Minds and Machines 10 (4).
  32. James Moor (1999). The Future of the Turing Test: The Next Fifty Years. Minds and Machines 9 (459).
  33. James H. Moor (1999). Introduction to the Power of the Net. Ethics and Information Technology 1 (2):93-94.
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  34. James H. Moor (1999). Just Consequentialism and Computing. Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):61-65.
    Computer and information ethics, as well as other fields of applied ethics, need ethical theories which coherently unify deontological and consequentialist aspects of ethical analysis. The proposed theory of just consequentialism emphasizes consequences of policies within the constraints of justice. This makes just consequentialism a practical and theoretically sound approach to ethical problems of computer and information ethics.
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  35. James H. Moor (1999). Special Note. Minds and Machines 9 (1):1-2.
  36. James H. Moor (1999). Using Genetic Information While Protecting the Privacy of the Soul. Ethics and Information Technology 1 (4):257-263.
    Computing plays an important role in genetics (and vice versa).Theoretically, computing provides a conceptual model for thefunction and malfunction of our genetic machinery. Practically,contemporary computers and robots equipped with advancedalgorithms make the revelation of the complete human genomeimminent – computers are about to reveal our genetic soulsfor the first time. Ethically, computers help protect privacyby restricting access in sophisticated ways to genetic information.But the inexorable fact that computers will increasingly collect,analyze, and disseminate abundant amounts of genetic informationmade available through the (...)
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  37. Terrell Ward Bynum & James Moor (eds.) (1998). The Digital Phoenix: How Computers Are Changing Philosophy. Blackwell Publishers.
    This important book, which results from a series of presentations at American Philosophical Association conferences, explores the major ways in which computers ...
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  38. Terrell Ward Bynum & James H. Moor (eds.) (1998). How Computers Are Changing Philosophy. Blackwell.
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  39. James H. Moor (1998). Assessing Artificial Intelligence and its Critics. In T. W. Bynum & Moor J. (eds.), The Digital Phoenix. Cambridge: Blackwell. 213--230.
  40. James H. Moor (1998). Cognition and Explanation–Foreword. Minds and Machines 8 (1):1-5.
  41. James H. Moor (1998). If Aristotle Were a Computing Professional. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (3):13-16.
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  42. James H. Moor (1998). Reason, Relativity, and Responsibility in Computer Ethics. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (1):14-21.
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  43. James H. Moor (1997). Towards a Theory of Privacy in the Information Age. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 27 (3):27-32.
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  44. James H. Moor (1995). Is Ethics Computable? Metaphilosophy 26 (1-2):1-21.
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  45. Charles E. M. Dunlop, Susan M. Haller & James Moor (1991). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 1 (2):221-232.
  46. Robert J. Fogelin & James H. Moor (1991). Lehrer on Incompatible Though Equally Coherent Systems. Philosophical Studies 64 (2):229 - 232.
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  47. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, James Moor & Robert Fogelin (1990). A Defence of Modus Tollens. Analysis 50 (1):9 - 16.
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  48. James Moor (1989). Tarski's World (Version 2.2). Teaching Philosophy 12 (1):47-49.
  49. James H. Moor (1988). The Pseudorealization Fallacy and the Chinese Room Argument. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Aspects of AI. D.
     
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  50. James H. Moor (1988). Testing Robots for Qualia. In Herbert R. Otto & James A. Tuedio (eds.), Perspectives on Mind. Kluwer.
     
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