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James P. Sterba [152]James Paul Sterba [1]
  1.  9
    James P. Sterba (2013). From Rationality to Equality. OUP Oxford.
    James P. Sterba offers something that philosophers have long sought: an argument showing that morality is rationally required. Furthermore he argues that morality requires substantial equality. Even libertarian perspectives, which would seem to require minimal enforcement of morality, are shown to lead to a requirement of equality.
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  2. James P. Sterba (1979). The Moral Presuppositions of Contractual Rights. Ethics 89 (3):298-300.
  3. James P. Sterba (1994). From Liberty to Welfare. Ethics 105 (1):64-98.
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  4.  29
    James P. Sterba (1977). Unselfishness. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 74 (3):189-193.
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  5. James P. Sterba (1980). Abortion, Distant Peoples, and Future Generations. Journal of Philosophy 77 (7):424-440.
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  6.  54
    James P. Sterba (2001). Three Challenges to Ethics: Environmentalism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism. Oxford University Press.
    In this unique work, James P. Sterba argues that traditional ethics has yet to confront the three significant challenges posed by environmentalism, feminism, and multiculturalism. He maintains that while traditional ethics has been quite successful at dealing with the problems it faces, it has not addressed the possibility that its solutions to these problems are biased in favor of humans, men, and Western culture. In Three Challenges to Ethics: Environmentalism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism, Sterba examines each of these challenges. In the (...)
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  7.  12
    James P. Sterba (2005). The Triumph of Practice Over Theory in Ethics. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):265-269.
    In this introduction, I summarize the main themes of my book, particularly those that my critics have focused on in their papers that follow. I also argue that I could not have reached the conclusions that I have if I hadn’t employed a peacemaking rather than a warmaking way of doing philosophy. I provide a characterization of a peacemaking way of doing philosophy and show how the conclusions of my book depend on doing philosophy in that way.
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  8.  38
    James P. Sterba (1995). From Biocentric Individualism to Biocentric Pluralism. Environmental Ethics 17 (2):191-207.
    Drawing on and inspired by Paul Taylor’s Respect for Nature, I develop a view which I call “biocentric pluralism,” which, I claim, avoids the major criticisms that have been directed at Taylor’s account. In addition, I show that biocentric pluralism has certain advantages over biocentric utilitarianism (VanDeVeer) and concentric circle theories (Wenz and Callicott).
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  9.  6
    James P. Sterba (2014). Replies to Bagnoli, MacIntosh, and Talbott. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):205-214.
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  10.  62
    James P. Sterba (1994). Reconciling Pacifists and Just War Theorists Revisited. Social Theory and Practice 20 (2):135-142.
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  11. James P. Sterba, Claudia Card, Jane Flax, Virginia Held, Ellen Klein, Janet Kournay, Michael Levin, Martha Nussbaum & Rosemarie Tong (2000). Controversies in Feminism. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Feminism was born in controversy and it continues to flourish in controversy. The distinguished contributors to this volume provide an array of perspectives on issues including: universal values, justice and care, a feminist philosophy of science, and the relationship of biology to social theory.
     
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  12.  52
    James P. Sterba (1996). Understanding Evil: American Slavery, the Holocaust, and the Conquest of the American Indians:Vessels of Evil: American Slavery and the Holocaust. Laurence Mordekhai Thomas. Ethics 106 (2):424-.
  13. James P. Sterba (2012). Introducing Ethics: For Here and Now. Pearson.
     
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  14.  12
    James P. Sterba, Eric Mack & Michael D. Bayles (1984). Book Review. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 3 (3):394-397.
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  15.  40
    James P. Sterba (2005). How to Achieve Global Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (1):53 – 68.
    In this paper, I argue that even a libertarian ideal of liberty, which initially seems opposed to welfare rights, can be seen to require a right to a basic needs minimum that extends to distant peoples and future generations and is conditional upon the poor doing whatever they reasonably can to meet their own basic needs, including bringing their population growth under control. Given that, as I have argued elsewhere, welfare liberal, socialist, communitarian and feminist political ideals can be easily (...)
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  16.  11
    James P. Sterba (2000). From Liberty to Welfare: An Update. Social Theory and Practice 26 (3):465-478.
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  17.  47
    James P. Sterba (2011). Biocentrism Defended. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):167 - 169.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 167-169, June 2011.
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  18.  64
    James P. Sterba (2003). Defending Affirmative Action, Defending Preferences. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (2):285–300.
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  19.  14
    James P. Sterba (2008). Completing the Kantian Project: From Rationality to Equality. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 82 (2):47 - 83.
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  20.  12
    James P. Sterba (1984). Contemporary Moral Philosophy and Practical Reason. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 58:73-83.
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  21.  15
    Jan Narveson & James P. Sterba (2011). Introduction. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):233-235.
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  22. James P. Sterba (ed.) (1993). Morality in Practice. Wadsworth.
     
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  23. Anita Allen, Lawrence C. Becker, Deryck Beyleveld, David Cummiskey, David DeGrazia, David M. Gallagher, Alan Gewirth, Virginia Held, Barbara Koziak, Donald Regan, Jeffrey Reiman, Henry Richardson, Beth J. Singer, Michael Slote, Edward Spence & James P. Sterba (1998). Gewirth: Critical Essays on Action, Rationality, and Community. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    As one of the most important ethicists to emerge since the Second World War, Alan Gewirth continues to influence philosophical debates concerning morality. In this ground-breaking book, Gewirth's neo-Kantianism, and the communitarian problems discussed, form a dialogue on the foundation of moral theory. Themes of agent-centered constraints, the formal structure of theories, and the relationship between freedom and duty are examined along with such new perspectives as feminism, the Stoics, and Sartre. Gewirth offers a picture of the philosopher's theory and (...)
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  24.  4
    James P. Sterba (1998). Justice for Here and Now. Cambridge University Press.
    This book conveys the breadth and interconnectedness of questions of justice - a rarity in contemporary moral and political philosophy. James P. Sterba argues that a minimal notion of rationality requires morality, and that a minimal libertarian morality requires the welfare and equal opportunity endorsee by welfare liberals and the equality endorsed by socialists, as well as a full feminist agenda. Feminist, racial, homosexual, and multicultural justice, are also shown to be mutually supporting. The author further shows the compatibility between (...)
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  25.  34
    James P. Sterba (2005). Global Justice for Humans or for All Living Beings and What Difference It Makes. Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):283 - 300.
    I begin with an account of what is deserved in human ethics, an ethics that assumes without argument that only humans, or rational agents, count morally. I then take up the question of whether nonhuman living beings are also deserving and answer it in the affirmative. Having established that all individual living beings, as well as ecosystems, are deserving, I go on to establish what it is that they deserve and then compare the requirements of global justice when only humans (...)
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  26.  21
    James P. Sterba (1981). The Welfare Rights of Distant Peoples and Future Generations: Moral Side Constraints on Social Policy. Social Theory and Practice 7 (1):99-119.
  27.  34
    Robert Frodeman, Dale Jamieson, J. Baird Callicott, Stephen M. Gardiner, Lori Gruen, Irene J. Klaver, Eugene Hargrove, Ben A. Minteer, Bryan Norton, Clare Palmer, Holmes Rolston, Ricardo Rozzi, James P. Sterba, William M. Throop & Victoria Davion (2007). Commentary on the Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):117 - 150.
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  28.  19
    James P. Sterba (1999). Reconciling Public Reason and Religious Values. Social Theory and Practice 25 (1):1-28.
    Philosophers who hold that religious considerations should play some role in public debate over fundamental issues have criticized Rawls’s ideal of public reason for being too restrictive in generally ruling out such considerations. In response, Rawls has modified his ideal so as to explicitly allow a role for religious considerations in public debate (others, such as Robert Audi, have also offered accounts of public reason along similar lines). Nevertheless, some critics of Rawls’s ideal of public reason, such as Nicholas Wolterstorff, (...)
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  29.  35
    James P. Sterba (1977). Retributive Justice. Political Theory 5 (3):349-362.
  30.  7
    James P. Sterba (2001). The Goshute, Past Injustices, and a Morally Acceptable Nuclear Waste Policy. Teaching Ethics 1 (1):89-91.
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  31.  42
    James P. Sterba (1978). In Defense of Rawls Against Arrow and Nozick. Philosophia 7 (2):293-303.
  32.  28
    James P. Sterba (1990). On Consequentialism and Deontology. Social Philosophy Today 3:41-45.
  33.  28
    James P. Sterba (1987). Justifying Morality: The Right and the Wrong Ways. Synthese 72 (1):45 - 69.
    Contemporary philosophers offer three kinds of justification for morality. Some, following plato, claim that morality is justified by self-interest. Others, following hume as he is frequently interpreted, claim that morality is justified in terms of other-regarding interests, wants or intentions that people happen to have. And still others, following kant, claim that morality is justified in terms of the requirements of practical reason. In "the moral point of view" published in 1958 and in a series of articles continuing to the (...)
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  34.  20
    James P. Sterba (ed.) (2009). Ethics: The Big Questions. Wiley-Blackwell.
    'Ought one to keep one's promises?' can be confused with or can be taken as (and I think has often been taken as) an external question roughly expressible ...
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  35. James P. Sterba (1988). How to Make People Just: A Practical Reconciliation of Alternative Conceptions of Justice. Rowman & Littlefield.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
     
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  36.  6
    James P. Sterba (1995). Explorations in Feminist Ethics. Teaching Philosophy 18 (1):88-90.
  37.  6
    James P. Sterba (2005). Responses to My Critics, Erin Kelly and B. C. Postow. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (3):397–405.
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  38.  29
    James P. Sterba (2004). Liam Murphy and Thomas Nagel, The Myth of Ownership: Taxes and Justice:The Myth of Ownership: Taxes and Justice. Ethics 114 (3):628-631.
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  39.  23
    James P. Sterba (1990). A Rational Choice Theory of Punishment. Philosophical Topics 18 (1):171-181.
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  40.  6
    James P. Sterba (2011). Putting Liberty and Equality Back Together Again. Social Philosophy Today 27:169-177.
  41.  13
    James P. Sterba (2005). Why the U.S. Must Immediately Withdraw From Iraq. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):1-9.
    In this paper, I argue that the U.S. and its coalition partners should announce that they intend to completely withdraw from Iraq within six months or less. And if this announcement did bring a suspension or reduction of hostilities against them, then, I argue, they should leave even sooner. For the most part, my grounds for holding this view are based on the lack of a justification for going to war against Iraq in the first place. But part of the (...)
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  42.  18
    James P. Sterba (1998). A Biocentrist Strikes Back. Environmental Ethics 20 (4):361-376.
    Biocentrists are criticized (1) for being biased in favor of the human species, (2) for basing their view on an ecology that is now widely challenged, and (3) for failing to reasonably distinguish the life that they claim has intrinsic value from the animate and inanimate things that they claim lack intrinsic value. In this paper, I show how biocentrism can be defended against these three criticisms, thus permitting biocentrists to justifiably appropriate the salutation, “Let the life force (or better (...)
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  43.  23
    James P. Sterba (2004). The Michigan Cases and Furthering the Justification for Affirmative Action. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (1):1-12.
    In this paper, I endorse the decision of the Supreme Court of the U.S. in Bollinger v. Grutter (2003). I argue that the educational benefits of diversity are an important enough state interest to justify the use of racial preferences and that, especially due to the absence of race-neutral alternatives, this use of racial preferences is narrowly tailored to that state interest. However, I also indicate that I am willing to give up my support for diversity affirmative action in the (...)
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  44.  9
    James P. Sterba (1994). Reconciling Anthropocentric and Nonanthropocentric Environmental Ethics. Environmental Values 3 (3):229 - 244.
    I propose to show that when the most morally defensible versions of an anthropocentric environmental ethics and a nonanthropocentric ethics are laid out, they would lead us to accept the same principles of environmental justice.
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  45.  11
    James P. Sterba (2011). The Rationale of U.S. War-Making Foreign Policy. The Acorn 14 (2):15-23.
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  46.  35
    James P. Sterba (1977). The Decline of Wolff's Anarchism. Journal of Value Inquiry 11 (3):213-217.
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  47.  21
    James P. Sterba (1985). A Libertarian Justification for a Welfare State. Social Theory and Practice 11 (3):285-306.
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  48.  26
    James P. Sterba (2002). Karen J. Warren, Ecofeminist Philosophy: A Western Perspective on What It Is and Why It Matters:Ecofeminist Philosophy: A Western Perspective on What It Is and Why It Matters. Ethics 113 (1):182-185.
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  49.  10
    James P. Sterba (2014). Precis. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):155-157.
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  50.  16
    James P. Sterba (1996). Review: Understanding Evil: American Slavery, the Holocaust, and the Conquest of the American Indians. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (2):424 - 448.
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