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  1. James R. Hurford (2011). The Origins of Grammar: Language in the Light of Evolution II. OUP Oxford.
    This is the second of the two closely linked but self-contained volumes that comprise James Hurford's acclaimed exploration of the biological evolution of language. In the first book he looked at the evolutionary origins of meaning, ending as our distant ancestors were about to step over the brink to modern language. He now considers how that step might have been taken and the consequences it undoubtedly had. -/- The capacity for language lets human beings formulate and express an unlimited range (...)
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  2. James R. Hurford (2008). Niche-Construction, Co-Evolution, and Domain-Specificity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):526-526.
    That language is shaped to fit the human brain is close to the Chomskyan position. The target article by Christiansen & Chater (C&C) assumes an entity, outside individual heads. What is the nature of this entity? Linguistic niche-construction and co-evolution of language and genes are possible, with some of what evolved being language-specific. Recent generative theory postulates much less than the old Universal Grammar (UG).
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  3. James R. Hurford (2007). Semantics: A Coursebook. Cambridge University Press.
    This practical coursebook introduces all the basics of semantics in a simple, step-by-step fashion. Each unit includes short sections of explanation with examples, followed by stimulating practice exercises to complete in the book. Feedback and comment sections follow each exercise to enable students to monitor their progress. No previous background in semantics is assumed, as students begin by discovering the value and fascination of the subject and then move through all key topics in the field, including sense and reference, simple (...)
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  4. James R. Hurford (2007). Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems. Interaction Studies 8 (3):501-517.
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  5. James R. Hurford (2007). The Origins of Meaning. Oxford University Press.
    In this, the first of two ground-breaking volumes on the nature of language in the light of the way it evolved, James Hurford looks at how the world first came ...
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  6. James R. Hurford, Molly Flaherty & Giorgis Argyropoulos (2007). Past and Future, Human and Nonhuman, Semantic/Procedural and Episodic. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):324-325.
    The overlap of representations of past and future is not a completely new idea. Suddendorf & Corballis (S&C) usefully discuss the problems of testing the existence of such representations. Our taxonomy of memory differs from theirs, emphasizing the late evolutionary emergence of notions of time in memory.
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  7. James R. Hurford (2003). The Neural Basis of Predicate-Argument Structure. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):261-283.
    Neural correlates exist for a basic component of logical formulae, PREDICATE(x). Vision and audition research in primates and humans shows two independent neural pathways; one locates objects in body-centered space, the other attributes properties, such as colour, to objects. In vision these are the dorsal and ventral pathways. In audition, similarly separable “where” and “what” pathways exist. PREDICATE(x) is a schematic representation of the brain's integration of the two processes of delivery by the senses of the location of an arbitrary (...)
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  8. James R. Hurford (2003). Ventral/Dorsal, Predicate/Argument: The Transformation From Perception to Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):301-311.
    It is necessary to distinguish among representations caused directly by perception, representations of past perceptions in long-term memory, the representations underlying linguis- tic utterances, and the surface phonological and grammatical structures of sentences. The target article dealt essentially with predicate-argument structure at the first of these levels of representation. Discussion of the commentaries mainly involves distinguishing among various applications of the term “predicate”; clarifying the assumed relationship between classical FOPL and language; clarifying the status of unique individuals as conceived by (...)
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  9. James R. Hurford & Jean-Louis Dessalles (2002). The Problematic Transition From Specific Competences to General Competence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):690-691.
    Postulating a variety of mutually isolated thought domains for prelinguistic creatures is both unparsimonious and implausible, requiring unexplained parallel evolution of each separate module. Furthermore, the proposal that domain-general concepts are not accessible without prior exposure to phonetically realized human language utterances cannot be implemented by any concept-acquisition mechanism.
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  10. Simon Kirby & James R. Hurford (2002). The Emergence of Linguistic Structure: An Overview of the Iterated Learning Model. In A. Cangelosi & D. Parisi (eds.), Simulating the Evolution of Language. Springer-Verlag. 121--147.
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  11. James R. Hurford (2001). Languages Treat 1-4 Specially. Mind and Language 16 (1):69–75.
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  12. James R. Hurford (1999). Individuals Are Abstractions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):620-621.
    Barsalou's move to a perceptual basis for cognition is welcome. His scheme contrasts with classical logical schemes in many ways, including its implications for the status of individuals. Barsalou deals mainly with perceived individuals, omitting discussion of cognized individuals. It is argued that the individuality of cognized individuals is an abstraction, which conforms in its manner of formation to other cognitive abstractions which Barsalou discusses, such as truth and disjunction.
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  13. James R. Hurford (1998). The Evolution of Language and Languages. In [Book Chapter] (Unpublished).
    Human languages, such as French, Cantonese or American Sign Language, are socio- cultural entities. Knowledge of them (`competence') is acquired by exposure to the ap- propriate environment. Languages are maintained and transmitted by acts of speaking and writing; and this is also the means by which languages evolve. The utterances of one generation are processed by their children to form mental grammars, which in some sense summarize, or generalize over, the children's linguistic experiences. These grammars are the basis for the (...)
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  14. James R. Hurford & Simon Kirby (1998). [Book Chapter] (Unpublished).
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  15. James R. Hurford & Simon Kirby (1998). Co-Evolution of Language-Size and the Critical Period. In [Book Chapter] (Unpublished).
    Species evolve, very slowly, through selection of genes which give rise to phenotypes well adapted to their environments. The cultures, including the languages, of human communities evolve, much faster, maintaining at least a minimum level of adaptedness to the external, non- cultural environment. In the phylogenetic evolution of species, the transmission of information across generations is via copying of molecules, and innovation is by mutation and sexual recombination. In cultural evolution, the transmission of information across generations is by learning, and (...)
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  16. James R. Hurford & Simon Kirby (1995). Neural Preconditions for Proto-Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):193.
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  17. James R. Hurford (1991). The Evolution of the Critical Period for Language Acquisition. Cognition 40 (3):159-201.
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  18. James R. Hurford (1990). Beyond the Roadblock in Linguistic Evolution Studies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):736-737.
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  19. James R. Hurford (1974). Exclusive or Inclusive Disjunction. Foundations of Language 11 (3):409-411.
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