Search results for 'James Richard Mensch' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: James Richard Mensch (Charles University, Prague)
  1.  2
    James Mensch (2011). James Mensch, Embodiments: From the Body to the Body Politic (Evanston, Il: Northwestern University Press, 2009) Religious Intolerance: Hating Your Neighbour as Yourself. Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue Canadienne de Philosophie Continentale 15 (2).
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  2. James Richard Mensch, Husserlian Reflections On Embodiment.
    To say we are present to ourselves through our bodies is to express something so obvious that most people hardly give it a thought. Philosophers, however, came late to this recognition. The idea that our embodiment shapes our apprehensions seemed to Descartes to designate a problem rather than a topic of study. His effort was to overcome embodiment, that is, to reach a realm where the unencumbered mind could confront the world. The same prejudice informed the modern tradition he founded. (...)
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  3.  1
    James Richard Mensch, Richard Peddicord, Philip J. Rossi & Lynne Sharpe (2005). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 518. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (3).
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  4. James R. Mensch (2015). Levinas's Existential Analytic: A Commentary on Totality and Infinity. Northwestern University Press.
    By virtue of the originality and depth of its thought, Emmanuel Levinas’s masterpiece, _Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority, _is destined to endure as one of the great works of philosophy. It is an essential text for understanding Levinas’s discussion of “the Other,” yet it is known as a “difficult” book. Modeled after Norman Kemp Smith’s commentary on _Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, Levinas’s Existential Analytic _guides both new and experienced readers through Levinas’s text. James R. Mensch (...)
     
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  5.  6
    James Mensch (2003). Postfoundational Phenomenology: Husserlian Reflections on Presence and Embodiment. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This book offers a fresh look at Edmund Husserl’s philosophy as a nonfoundational approach to understanding the self as an embodied presence. -/- Contrary to the conventional view of Husserl as carrying on the Cartesian tradition of seeking a trustworthy foundation for knowledge in the "pure" observations of a disembodied ego, James Mensch introduces us to the Husserl who, anticipating the later investigations of Merleau-Ponty, explored how the body functions to determine our self-presence, our freedom, and our sense (...)
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  6. James Mensch, The Phenomenology of Self-Makin: Towards a Hegelian Dialectic.
    James Mensch, 1970 No philosophical activity is immune from the question of its grounds, its origin, its arche. Philosophizing is not carried out in a vacuum. The philosopher in any inclusive view cannot be seen to be a being set apart from the world about which he philosophizes. He is distinct neither from the world nor its history considered in its totality. A truth so obvious requires only a brief meditative reflection: A philosopher sits writing at his desk. (...)
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  7. James R. Mensch (1996). Knowing and Being: A Postmodern Reversal. Penn State University Press.
    Everyone knows that "postmodernism" implies pluralism, anti-foundationalism, and, generally,a postnormative view of the self and reality. While many embrace it, few bother to tell us what is wrong with modernity. What are the problems that brought about its crisis and ultimate demise as a philosophical and cultural movement? What are the lessons for the postmodern movement that can he drawn from them? James Mensch here explains why modernism failed as a viable philosophical enterprise and how postmodernism must be (...)
     
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  8. James R. Mensch (2004). Knowing and Being: A Postmodern Reversal. Penn State University Press.
    Everyone knows that "postmodernism" implies pluralism, anti-foundationalism, and, generally,a postnormative view of the self and reality. While many embrace it, few bother to tell us what is wrong with modernity. What are the problems that brought about its crisis and ultimate demise as a philosophical and cultural movement? What are the lessons for the postmodern movement that can he drawn from them? James Mensch here explains why modernism failed as a viable philosophical enterprise and how postmodernism must be (...)
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  9. James R. Mensch (2000). Postfoundational Phenomenology: Husserlian Reflections on Presence and Embodiment. Penn State University Press.
    This book offers a fresh look at Edmund Husserl’s philosophy as a nonfoundational approach to understanding the self as an embodied presence. Contrary to the conventional view of Husserl as carrying on the Cartesian tradition of seeking a trustworthy foundation for knowledge in the "pure" observations of a disembodied ego, James Mensch introduces us to the Husserl who, anticipating the later investigations of Merleau-Ponty, explored how the body functions to determine our self-presence, our freedom, and our sense of (...)
     
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  10. James R. Mensch (2003). Postfoundational Phenomenology: Husserlian Reflections on Presence and Embodiment. Penn State University Press.
    This book offers a fresh look at Edmund Husserl’s philosophy as a nonfoundational approach to understanding the self as an embodied presence. Contrary to the conventional view of Husserl as carrying on the Cartesian tradition of seeking a trustworthy foundation for knowledge in the "pure" observations of a disembodied ego, James Mensch introduces us to the Husserl who, anticipating the later investigations of Merleau-Ponty, explored how the body functions to determine our self-presence, our freedom, and our sense of (...)
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  11.  8
    Margaret van de Pitte (1999). Knowing and Being: A Postmodern Reversal James Richard Mensch University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1966, 232 Pp., $45.00, $17.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (02):451-.
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  12.  5
    Jeff Mitscherling (1999). After Modernity: Husserlian Reflections on a Philosophical Tradition James Richard Mensch Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1996, 309 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (01):223-.
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  13.  49
    Robin James (2009). In but Not of, of but Not In: On Taste, Hipness, and White Embodiment. Contemporary Aesthetics 2 (Aesthetics and Race).
    The status of the body figures paradoxically in the interrelated discourses of whiteness, aesthetic taste, and hipness. While Richard Dyer’s analysis of whiteness argues that white identity is “in but not of the body,” Carolyn Korsmeyer’s and Julia Kristeva’s feminist analyses of aesthetic “taste” demonstrate that this faculty is traditionally conceived as something “of” but not “in” the body. While taste directly distances whiteness from embodiment, hipness negatively affirms this same distance: the hipster proves his elite status within white (...)
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  14.  2
    Maria C. Cimitile, Elian P. Miller, Greene Richard & K. Silem Mohammad (forthcoming). Brusseau, James. Decadence of the French Nietzsche. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2006. $26.95 Pb. Campbell, James. A Thoughtful Profession: The Early Years of the American Philosophical Association. Chicago: Open Court, 2006. $49.95 Pb. Cavell, Stanley. Philosophy the Day After Tomorrow. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006. $17.95 Pb. [REVIEW] Philosophy Today.
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  15. Réginald Richard (1992). Eaton Whitehead, Evelyn, Whitehead, James D., Les Étapes de l'Âge Adulte : Évolution Psychologique Et religieuseEaton Whitehead, Evelyn, Whitehead, James D., Les Étapes de l'Âge Adulte : Évolution Psychologique Et Religieuse. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 48 (1):136-137.
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  16.  18
    James Mensch (2013). Violence and Selfhood. Human Studies 36 (1):25-41.
    Is violence senseless or is it at the origin of sense? Does its destruction of meaning disclose ourselves as the origin of meaning? Or is it the case that it leaves in its wake only a barren field? Does it result in renewal or only in a sense of dead loss? To answer these questions, I shall look at James Dodd’s, Hegel’s, and Carl Schmitt’s accounts of the creative power of violence—particularly with regard to its ability to give individuals (...)
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  17. James Mensch, The Bible as Literature.
    In discussing the Bible as literature, I am simply going to assume that the Bible, particularly in the King James version, is great literature. I am also going to take for granted the fact that its stories and themes have continually sparked the literary imagination of the West. From the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden to that of the Resurrection we have a set of symbols, motifs, and themes whose reworking has been the subject of the (...)
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  18. James Mensch, The Question of Being In.
    I wish to acknowledge my gratitude to Professor James Morrison of the University of Toronto for his encouragement and aid in the preparation of this work. His generosity is an example of the genuine philosophic spirit. I should also like to thank Ernie and Frauke Hankamer as well as Hugo and Ruth Jakusch whose kindness sustained us in Munich and Dieben. Finally, mention must be made of the Canada Council without whose financial aid this book would not have been (...)
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  19.  40
    William James (ed.) (2008). A Pluralistic Universe: Hibbert Lectures at Manchester College on the Present Situation in Philosophy, by William James; A New Philosophical Reading. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    This new edition of William James’s 1909 classic, A Pluralistic Universe reproduces the original text, only modernizing the spelling. The books has been annotated throughout to clarify James’s points of reference and discussion. There is a new, fuller index, a brief chronology of James’s life, and a new bibliography—chiefly based on James’s own references. The editor, H.G. Callaway, has included a new Introduction which elucidates the legacy of Jamesian pluralism to survey some related questions of (...)
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  20.  12
    William James (1996). The Vision of James. Element.
    William James had the courage to experience the collision of European and American ways of thinking head on, and to emerge from it with a new philosophy - one displaying a remarkable vitality for dealing with the transformative issues at the core of the human condition. This easy to read introduction to his life and work explains why James' work is overwhelmingly valuable to us today in getting to grips with the spiritual dimension of human experience.
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  21.  15
    William James (1967/1968). The Writings of William James. New York, Modern Library.
  22. James Mensch (2007). The a Priori of the Visible. Studia Phaenomenologica 7:259-283.
    Jan Patočka and Maurice Merleau-Ponty attempted to get beyond Husserl by focusing on manifestation or visibility as such. Yet, the results these philosophers come to are very different — particularly with regard to the a priori of the visible. Are there, as Patočka believed, aspects of being that can be grasped in their entirety, the aspects, namely, that involve its “self-showing”? Or must we say, with Merleau-Ponty, that being can only show itself in finite perspectives that can never be summed (...)
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  23.  7
    James Mensch (forthcoming). Husserl, Heidegger, and Sartre: Presence and the Performative Contradiction. The European Legacy:1-18.
    In this essay I explore the divide that separates Heidegger and Sartre from Husserl. At issue is what Derrida calls the “metaphysics of presence.” From Heidegger onward this has been characterized as an interpretation of both being and knowing in terms of presence. To exist is to be now, and to know is to make present the evidence for something’s existence. Husserl’s account of constitution assumes this interpretation. By contrast, Heidegger and Sartre see constitution in terms of our pragmatic engagements (...)
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  24. James Mensch (2003). Givenness and Alterity. Idealistic Studies 33 (1):1-7.
    If we trace the word phenomenon to its Greek origin, we find it is the participle of the verb, phainesthai, “to show itself.” The phenomenon is that which shows itself; it is the manifest. As Heidegger noted, phenomenology is the study of this showing. It examines how things show themselves to be what they are.1 One of the most difficult problems faced by phenomenology is the mystery of our self-showing. How do we show ourselves to be what we are? How (...)
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  25. James Mensch (2010). Husserl's Account of Our Consciousness of Time. Marquette University Press.
    Having asked, “What, then, is time?” Augustine admitted, “I know well enough what it is, provided that nobody asks me; but if I am asked what it is and try to explain, I am baffled.” We all have a sense of time, but the description and explanation of it remain remarkably elusive. Through a series of detailed descriptions, Husserl attempted to clarify this sense of time. In my book, I trace the development of his account of our temporal self-awareness, starting (...)
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  26. James Mensch (2009). Embodiments: From the Body to the Body Politic. Northwestern University Press.
    The intertwining: the recursion of the seer and the seen -- Artificial intelligence and the phenomenology of flesh -- Aesthetic education and the project of being human -- The intertwining of incommensurables: Yann Martel's life of Pi -- Flesh and the limits of self-making -- Violence and embodiment -- Excessive presence and the image -- Politics and freedom -- Sovereignty and alterity -- Political violence -- Public space -- Sustaining the other: tolerance as a positive ideal -- Forgiveness and incarnation.
     
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  27.  3
    James R. Mensch (2003). Ethics and Selfhood: Alterity and the Phenomenology of Obligation. State University of New York Press.
    Argues that a coherent theory of ethics requires an account of selfhood.
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  28.  2
    James Mensch (1988). Intersubjectivity and Transcendental Idealism. SUNY Press.
    This book offers new answers to this persistent philosophical question by defining the question in specifically Husserlian terms and by means of a careful examination of Husserl’s later texts, including the unpublished Nachlass.
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  29.  12
    James Mensch (2008). Violence and Embodiment. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 12 (1):4-15.
    While the various forms of violence have been the subject of special studies, we lack a paradigm that would allow us to understand the different forms of violence (physical, social, cultural, structural, and so on) as aspects of a unified phenomenon. In this article, I shall take violence as destructive of sense or meaning. The relation of violence to embodiment arises through the role that the body plays in our making sense of the world. My claim is that violence is (...)
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  30.  15
    James Mensch (2006). Politics and Freedom. Idealistic Studies 36 (1):75-82.
    True freedom involves choices whose scope is not limited in advance by a particular dogma. When we attempt to understand it, a number of questions arise. It is unclear, for example, how the openness of real choice can fit into the organized structures of political life. What prevents the expressions of freedom from disrupting this life? What sets limits to their arbitrariness? The general questionhere concerns the adaptability of freedom to a political context. In this paper, I argue that freedom (...)
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  31.  89
    James Mensch (2013). The Question of Naturalizing Phenomenology. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 17 (1):210-228.
    The attempt to use the results of phenomenology in cognitive and neural science has in the past decade become increasingly widespread. It is, however, open to the objection that phenomenology does not concern itself with the embodied, empirical subject, but rather with the non-causally determined “transcendental” subject. If this is true, then the attempt to employ its results is bound to come to grief on the opposition of two different accounts of consciousness: the non-causal, transcendental paradigm put forward by phenomenology (...)
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  32.  20
    James Mensch (2008). Violence and Embodiment. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 12 (1):4-15.
    While the various forms of violence have been the subject of special studies, we lack a paradigm that would allow us to understand the different forms of violence (physical, social, cultural, structural, and so on) as aspects of a unified phenomenon. In this article, I shall take violence as destructive of sense or meaning. The relation of violence to embodiment arises through the role that the body plays in our making sense of the world. My claim is that violence is (...)
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  33.  11
    Kevin Hawthorne, Michael James, Richard Kraut, Miguel Vattei Tarnopolsky, Candace Voglen Stephen White & Linda Zerilli (2003). Tragic Recognition. Political Theory 31 (1):6-38.
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  34.  21
    James R. Mensch (1997). Instincts — a Husserlian Account. Husserl Studies 14 (3):219-237.
    According to the standard, accepted view of Husserl, the notion of a Husserlian account of the instincts appears paradoxical. Is not Husserl the proponent of a philosophy conducted by a “pure” observer? Instincts relate to the body, but the reduction seems to leave us with a disembodied Cartesian ego. Quotations are not lacking to support this view.
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  35.  78
    James R. Mensch (2000). An Objective Phenomenology: Husserl Sees Colors. Journal of Philosophical Research 25 (January):231-60.
    David Chalmers expresses a general consensus when he writes that.
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  36.  39
    James Mensch (2001). Derrida–Husserl. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 1:1-66.
  37.  8
    James Mensch (2014). Eros and Justice: The Erotic Origin of Society. Levinas Studies 9:97-121.
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  38.  26
    James R. Mensch (1991). Phenomenology and Artificial Intelligence: Husserl Learns Chinese. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 8 (2):107-127.
    For over a decade John Searle's ingenious argument against the possibility of artificial intelligence has held a prominent place in contemporary philosophy. This is not just because of its striking central example and the apparent simplicity of its argument. As its appearance in Scientific American testifies, it is also due to its importance to the wider scientific community. If Searle is right, artificial intelligence in the strict sense, the sense that would claim that mind can be instantiated through a formal (...)
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  39.  21
    James Mensch (2012). Public Space and Embodiment. Studia Phaenomenologica 12:211-226.
    Hannah Arendt’s notion of public space is one of her most fruitful, yet frustrating concepts. Having employed it to analyze political freedom, she claims that such space has largely disappeared in the modern world. In what follows, I am going to argue that this pessimistic assessment follows from Arendt’s exclusion of labor and work from the public realm. Against Arendt’s claim that such activities are essentially private, I shall argue that they, like action, manifest our embodied being-in-the-world. When we think (...)
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  40. James R. Mensch, Multiple Personality Disorder: A Phenomenological/Postmodern Account.
    A striking feature of post-modernism is its distrust of the subject. If the modern period, beginning with Descartes, sought in the subject a source of certainty, an Archimedian point from which all else could be derived, post- modernism has taken the opposite tack. Rather than taking the self as a foundation, it has seen it as founded, as dependent on the accidents which situate consciousness in the world. The same holds for the unity of the subject. Modernity, in its search (...)
     
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  41.  57
    James Mensch (2007). Public Space. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (1):31-47.
    “Public space” is the space where individuals see and are seen by others as they engage in public affairs. Hannah Arendt links this space with “public freedom.” The being of such freedom, she asserts, depends on its appearing. It consists of “deeds and words which are meant to appear, whose very existence hinges on appearance.” Such appearance, however, requires the public space. Reflecting on Arendt’s remarks, a number of questions arise: What does the dependence of freedom on public space tell (...)
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  42.  23
    Thomas A. James (2013). Gordon Kaufman, Flat Ontology, and Value: Toward an Ecological Theocentrism. Zygon 48 (3):565-577.
    Gordon Kaufman's theology is characterized by a heightened tension between transcendence, expressed as theocentrism, and immanence, expressed as theological naturalism. The interplay between these two motifs leads to a contradiction between an austerity created by the conjunction of naturalism and theocentrism, on the one hand, and a humanized cosmos which is characterized by a pivotal and unique role for human moral agency, on the other. This paper tracks some of the influences behind Kaufman's program (primarily H. Richard Niebuhr (...)
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  43.  57
    Jonathan Bricklin & W. James (2005). William James: The Notion of Consciousness --Communication Made (in French) at the 5th International Congress of Psychology, Rome, 30 April (a New Translation by Jonathan Bricklin). [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (7):55-64.
    I should like to convey to you some doubts which have occurred to me on the subject of the notion of consciousness that prevails in all our treatises on psychology.
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  44.  4
    James Mensch (2015). Desire and Selfhood. The European Legacy 20 (7):689-698.
    As Hegel observed in his Phenomenology of Spirit, “Self-consciousness, for the most part, is desire.” Phenomenologically, the “object of consciousness is itself… present only in opposition” to consciousness, while consciousness is felt as the absence of the longed-for object. According to Hegel, when desire is satisfied, this opposition ends and self-consciousness ceases. My essay seeks to answer the question of why desire never really terminates, why it almost continuously characterizes our waking life. I shall do so by exploring desire not (...)
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  45.  47
    James Mensch (2010). The Temporality of Merleau-Ponty’s Intertwining. Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):449-463.
    In his last work, The Visible and the Invisible, Merleau-Ponty explored the fact that we believe that perception occurs in our heads and, hence, assert that the perceptual world is in us, while also believing that we are in the world we perceive. In this article, I examine how this intertwining of self and world justifies the faith we have in perception. I shall do so by considering a number of examples. In each case, the object in itself will turn (...)
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  46.  17
    James R. Mensch (2009). The Phenomenological Status of the Ego. Idealistic Studies 39 (1/3):1-9.
    For phenomenology, the study of appearances and the ways they come together to present a world, the question of the ego presents special difficulties. The ego, itself, is not an appearance; it is the subject to whom appearances appear. As such, it cannot appear. As the neo-Kantian, Paul Natorp expresses this:“The ego is the subjective center of relation for all contents in my consciousness. . . . It cannot itself be a content and resembles nothing that could be a content (...)
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  47.  32
    James R. Mensch (2000). An Objective Phenomenology: Husserl Sees Colors. Journal of Philosophical Research 25 (January):231-260.
    This paper proposes an explanatory bridge between structures of processing and qualia. It shows how the process of their arising is such that qualia are nonpublic objects, i.e., are only accessible to the person experiencing them. My basic premise is that the subjective “felt” character of qualia is a function of this first-person character. The account I provide is basically Husserlian. Thus, I use Husserl’s analyses to show why qualia always refer to a single point of view, that of a (...)
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  48.  48
    James R. Mensch (1997). Freedom and Selfhood. Husserl Studies 14 (1):41-59.
    Freedom is a perennial topic of philosophy. It is also one of themost puzzling. Regarding it, we are tempted to say with Augustine, “I know well enough what it is, provided that nobody asks me.” 1 We can all sense its presence.We use the word constantly, yet an account of it seems to elude us.My purpose in this paper is to see if phenomenology can provide such an account, one that includes in its description the features philosophers ascribe to freedom. (...)
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  49. William James (1926). The Letters of William James. Little, Brown & Co.
     
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  50.  12
    James Mensch (2002). Selfhood and Politics. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 6 (1):11-22.
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