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Profile: James Rocha (Louisiana State University)
  1.  62
    James Rocha (2011). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. Philosophy 7 (1).
  2.  16
    James Rocha (2016). Aggressive Hook Ups: Modeling Aggressive Casual Sex on BDSM for Moral Permissibility. Res Publica 22 (2):173-192.
    Aggressive techniques within casual sex encounters, such as taking sexual liberties without permission or ignoring rejection, can, perhaps unintentionally, complicate consent. Passive recipients may acquiesce out of fear, which aggressors may not realize. Some philosophers argue that social norms are sufficiently well known to make this misunderstanding unlikely. However, the chance of aggression leading to non-consensual sex, even if not great, is high enough that aggressors should work diligently to avoid this potentially grave result. I consider how this problem plays (...)
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  3.  33
    James Rocha (2011). Autonomy Within Subservient Careers. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (3):313-328.
    While there is much literature on autonomy and the conditions for its attainment, there is less on how those conditions reflect on agents’ ordinary careers. Most people’s careers involve a great deal of subservient activity that would prevent the kind of control over agents’ actions that autonomy would seem to require. Yet, it would seem strange to deny autonomy to every agent who regularly follows orders at work—to do so would make autonomy a futile ideal. Most contemporary autonomy accounts provide (...)
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  4.  43
    James Rocha (2010). Sean A. Spence, the Actor's Brain: Exploring the Cognitive Neuroscience of Free Will. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (3):401-405.
  5.  12
    James Rocha (2013). Unauthorized but Permitted. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 20 (1):1-14.
    While politicians seek to increase punitive measures against so-called "illegal aliens," it is worth asking whether unauthorized immigrants are obligated by immigration laws that would demand their punishment, whether it is deportation or jail time. I seek to examine this question in light of the traditional defenses of legal obligations: consent, prudential interest, and fairness. Due to the various ways in which the benefits of society are largely excluded from them and the severe penalties that the state seeks to impose (...)
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  6.  3
    James Rocha (2015). Kantian Respect for Minimally Rational Animals. Social Theory and Practice 41 (2):309-327.
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  7.  16
    James Rocha (2012). Autonomous Abortions: The Inhibiting of Women's Autonomy Through Legal Ultrasound Requirements. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (1):35-58.
  8.  18
    James Rocha (2011). The Sexual Harassment Coercive Offer. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):203-216.
    There is disagreement in the coercion literature over whether an offer, which necessarily lacks a threat, could be coercive, which tends to imply at least some affinity with coercion, which, in paradigm cases, includes a threat. In one difficult sexual harassment case, someone is offered a promotion in exchange for sex, but there is, due to the arrangement of the case, no implied threat or repercussion for refusal. I argue this case counts as coercive since the offer-making attempts to recast (...)
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  9.  2
    James Rocha (2015). A Priori Progress: A Comment on Ryan Nichols’ “Hypothesis-Testing of the Humanities: The Hard and Soft Humanities As Two Emerging Cultures”. Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):29-35.
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  10.  2
    James Rocha (2014). Forced to Listen to the Heart: Fetal Heartbeat Laws and Autonomous Abortions. Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (1):187-194.
    Among the various proposed ultrasound laws, a few have provisions that either provide the option for the pregnant woman to hear the heartbeat or require that the heartbeat be played and merely give the woman the option to somehow avert her ears. I will argue that these heartbeat provisions actually belie the argument that these laws are intended to assist autonomous choosing. Since the information could be provided just as easily through a factual statement , it cannot be justified to (...)
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  11.  1
    James Rocha (2015). The Homophobic Sexual Harassment Claim and Sexuality Discrimination. Ratio Juris 28 (2):204-215.
    In sexual harassment law scholarship, it is often argued that the reasonable person standard should give way to a reasonable victim standard. Yet, this latter standard may unintentionally invite homophobic employees to attempt to use a reasonable homophobe standard to charge gay supervisors with harassment merely for being openly gay at work. In response, I argue that we currently act on an unjustifiable distinction whereby we treat sexuality behavior as necessarily sexualized only for GLBTQ behavior. By disallowing this discriminatory treatment, (...)
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  12.  1
    James Rocha (2013). Sour Clinical Trials: Autonomy and Adaptive Preferences in Experimental Medicine. In Juha Räikkä & Jukka Varelius (eds.), Adaptation and Autonomy: Adaptive Preferences in Enhancing and Ending Life. Springer 101--115.
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