7 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: James Rocha (Louisiana State University)
  1. James Rocha (2013). Sour Clinical Trials: Autonomy and Adaptive Preferences in Experimental Medicine. In Juha Räikkä & Jukka Varelius (eds.), Adaptation and Autonomy: Adaptive Preferences in Enhancing and Ending Life. Springer. 101--115.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. James Rocha (2013). Unauthorized but Permitted. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 20 (1):1-14.
    While politicians seek to increase punitive measures against so-called "illegal aliens," it is worth asking whether unauthorized immigrants are obligated by immigration laws that would demand their punishment, whether it is deportation or jail time. I seek to examine this question in light of the traditional defenses of legal obligations: consent, prudential interest, and fairness. Due to the various ways in which the benefits of society are largely excluded from them and the severe penalties that the state seeks to impose (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. James Rocha (2012). Autonomous Abortions: The Inhibiting of Women's Autonomy Through Legal Ultrasound Requirements. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (1):35-58.
  4. James Rocha (2011). Autonomy Within Subservient Careers. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (3):313-328.
    While there is much literature on autonomy and the conditions for its attainment, there is less on how those conditions reflect on agents’ ordinary careers. Most people’s careers involve a great deal of subservient activity that would prevent the kind of control over agents’ actions that autonomy would seem to require. Yet, it would seem strange to deny autonomy to every agent who regularly follows orders at work—to do so would make autonomy a futile ideal. Most contemporary autonomy accounts provide (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. James Rocha (2011). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. Philosophy 7 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. James Rocha (2011). The Sexual Harassment Coercive Offer. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):203-216.
    There is disagreement in the coercion literature over whether an offer, which necessarily lacks a threat, could be coercive, which tends to imply at least some affinity with coercion, which, in paradigm cases, includes a threat. In one difficult sexual harassment case, someone is offered a promotion in exchange for sex, but there is, due to the arrangement of the case, no implied threat or repercussion for refusal. I argue this case counts as coercive since the offer-making attempts to recast (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. James Rocha (2010). Sean A. Spence, the Actor's Brain: Exploring the Cognitive Neuroscience of Free Will. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (3):401-405.