Search results for 'James S. Marks' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  25
    V. Denise James (2013). Reading Anna J. Cooper with William James: Black Feminist Visionary Pragmatism, Philosophy's Culture of Justification, and Belief. The Pluralist 8 (3):32-45.
    When William James spoke about belief to the philosophy clubs of Yale and Brown in 1896, he forewarned his audience of the nature of his comments by describing them as a “sermon on justification by faith” (James 13), titling the talk “The Will to Believe.” Although there is disagreement about the substance of James’s remarks, it is fairly innocuous to assert that James thought they were appropriate because of the prevalence of the “logical spirit” of many (...)
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  2.  5
    James S. Marks, Michelle A. Larkin & Angela K. McGowan (2011). Lawyers, Guns, and Money: A Plenary Presentation From the Conference “Using Law, Policy, and Research to Improve the Public's Health”. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (s1):9-14.
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  3. James S. Marks, Michelle A. Larkin & Angela K. McGowan (2011). Lawyers, Guns, and Money: A Plenary Presentation From the Conference “Using Law, Policy, and Research to Improve the Public's Health”. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39:9-14.
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  4. John Agresto, John E. Alvis, Donald R. Brand, Paul O. Carrese, Laurence D. Cooper, Murray Dry, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Thomas S. Engeman, Christopher Flannery, Steven Forde, David Fott, David F. Forte, Matthew J. Franck, Bryan-Paul Frost, David Foster, Peter B. Josephson, Steven Kautz, John Koritansky, Peter Augustine Lawler, Howard L. Lubert, Harvey C. Mansfield, Jonathan Marks, Sean Mattie, James McClellan, Lucas E. Morel, Peter C. Meyers, Ronald J. Pestritto, Lance Robinson, Michael J. Rosano, Ralph A. Rossum, Richard S. Ruderman, Richard Samuelson, David Lewis Schaefer, Peter Schotten, Peter W. Schramm, Kimberly C. Shankman, James R. Stoner, Natalie Taylor, Aristide Tessitore, William Thomas, Daryl McGowan Tress, David Tucker, Eduardo A. Velásquez, Karl-Friedrich Walling, Bradley C. S. Watson, Melissa S. Williams, Delba Winthrop, Jean M. Yarbrough & Michael Zuckert (2003). History of American Political Thought. Lexington Books.
    This book is a collection of secondary essays on America's most important philosophic thinkers—statesmen, judges, writers, educators, and activists—from the colonial period to the present. Each essay is a comprehensive introduction to the thought of a noted American on the fundamental meaning of the American regime.
     
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  5.  40
    William James (ed.) (2008). A Pluralistic Universe: Hibbert Lectures at Manchester College on the Present Situation in Philosophy, by William James; A New Philosophical Reading. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    This new edition of William James’s 1909 classic, A Pluralistic Universe reproduces the original text, only modernizing the spelling. The books has been annotated throughout to clarify James’s points of reference and discussion. There is a new, fuller index, a brief chronology of James’s life, and a new bibliography—chiefly based on James’s own references. The editor, H.G. Callaway, has included a new Introduction which elucidates the legacy of Jamesian pluralism to survey some related questions of contemporary (...)
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  6.  13
    Richard M. Gale (1997). William James's Semantics of "Truth". Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 33 (4):863 - 898.
    James's most original and important contribution was his moralizing of epistemology, in particular belief-acceptance and truth. We are always to believe in a way that maximizes desire-satisfaction, with a proposition counting as true when a belief in it maximizes desire-satisfaction. The theory of truth that falls out of James's pragmatic theory of meaning must be downgraded to a theory of when a proposition is epistemology warranted, thus the reason for the scare-quotation marks around "Truth" in the title (...)
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  7. James F. Smith (1971). Lasco's Marks of the Church Against a Nominalist Background. Philosophia Reformata 36:184.
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  8.  5
    Roxana Havrici (2010). Gerrie ter Haar Oi James J. Busuttil (Eds.), The Freedom to Do God's Will. Religious Fundamentalism and Social Change. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):244-245.
    Gerrie ter Haar oi James J. Busuttil (eds.), The Freedom to Do God’s Will. Religious Fundamentalism and Social Change Routledge, London and New York, 2003.
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  9. James C. S. Wernham (1997). James's Will-to-Believe Doctrine. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In 1896 William James published an essay entitled The Will to Believe, in which he defended the legitimacy of religious faith against the attacks of such champions of scientific method as W.K. Clifford and Thomas Huxley. James's work quickly became one of the most important writings in the philosophy of religious belief. James Wernham analyses James's arguments, discusses his relation to Pascal and Renouvier, and considers the interpretations, and misinterpretations, of James's major critics. Wernham shows (...)
     
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  10.  16
    Mathias Girel (2007). A Chronicle of Pragmatism in France Before 1907: William James in Renouvier’s Critique Philosophique. In Sergio Franzese (ed.), Fringes of Religious Experience, Cross-Perspectives on James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience. Ontos Verlag 169-200.
    In this paper, I'm giving an account of William James's reception in the columns of Charles Renouvier's journal, La Critique philosophique. The papers explores the discussions between James and Renouvier on Free Will, Philosophical systems, Consciousness and Pluralism.
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  11.  10
    Steven Fesmire (1998). Remaking the Modern Mind: William James's Reconstruction of Rationality. Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (2):65-81.
    The past few decades have witnessed a growing concern to reveal the futility of the quest for absolute, ahistorical rational standards. Instead, philosophers have sought theories that will prove responsive to the humanness of rationality. The classical pragmatist tradition in American philosophy provides a tremendously fruitful yet still too often overlooked framework for accommodating, clarifying, and extending current explorations of human reason.
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  12. James O. Pawelski (2001). Heaven's Champion: William James's Philosophy of Religion (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (1):56-61.
    William James is notorious for the large number of inconsistencies and at least apparent contradictions in his writings. Many readers conclude that he should be appreciated more for his profound but erratic insights than for any coherent philosophical perspective. Ellen Kappy Suckiel disagrees. She argues that James is far more careful and systematic than many readers realize. Her work on James is guided by the attempt to lay bare his coherent philosophical vision and the consistent philosophical methodology (...)
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  13.  51
    Mathias Girel (2003). The Metaphysics and Logic of Psychology: Peirce's Reading of James's Principles. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 39 (2):163-203.
    The present paper deals thus with some fundamental agreements and disagreements between Peirce and James, on crucial issues such as perception and consciousness. When Peirce first read the Principles, he was sketching his theory of the categories, testing its applications in many fields of knowledge, and many investigations were launched, concerning indexicals, diagrams, growth and development. James's utterances led Peirce to make his own views clearer on a wide range of topics that go to the heart of the (...)
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  14.  73
    Jennifer Welchman (2006). William James's "the Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):229-241.
    : William James's "The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of suggesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics continue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" confuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs—not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional stress of (...)
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  15. Douglas R. Anderson (2004). Philosophy as Teaching: James's "Knight Errant," Thomas Davidson. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):239-247.
    In 1905 William James wrote an essay in McClure's Magazine recalling the importance to his own work of the Scottish-born philosopher Thomas Davidson. In the essay, James states that Davidson was "essentially a teacher." What is interesting when one looks at Davidson's life and work is that, for Davidson, teaching does seem to be an essential feature of what it means to be a philosopher. Here, I develop how Davidson construes this linking of philosophy and teaching with a (...)
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  16.  29
    Paul Jerome Croce (2007). Mankind's Own Providence: From Swedenborgian Philosophy of Use to William James's Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (3):490 - 508.
    : It is part of the conventional wisdom about the James family that the elder Henry James (1811–82) had a large influence on his son, William James (1842–1910), in the direction of religious interests. But William neither adopted his father's spirituality nor did he regard it as a foil to his own secularity. Instead, after first rejecting the elder James's idiosyncratic faith, he became increasingly intrigued with his insights into the natural world, which were in turn (...)
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  17. Wesley Cooper (2002). The Unity of William James's Thought. Vanderbilt University Press.
    Wesley Cooper opposes the traditional view of William Jamesís philosophy which dismissed it as fragmented or merely popular, arguing instead that there is a systematic philosophy to be found in James's writings. His doctrine of pure experience is the binding thread that links his earlier psychological theorizing to his later epistemological, religious, and pragmatic concerns.
     
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  18.  13
    James T. Kloppenberg (2009). James's Pragmatism and American Culture, 1907-2007. In John J. Stuhr (ed.), 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press
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  19. Doug Anderson (2003). Respectability and the Wild Beasts of the Philosophical Desert: The Heart of James'S. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (1):1-13.
    This commentary was suggested to me in part by a colleague's remark that it would be nice if we could make William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience "respectable." The implication was that though there was something redeemable about the book, it somehow wasn't philosophically or scientifically proper. The remark awakened me to—or at least reminded me of—the fact that this has been a traditional take on James's text. As Julius Bixler points out, ridicule began soon after the (...)
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  20. Alexander Klein (2008). Divide Et Impera! William James's Pragmatist Tradition in the Philosophy of Science. Philosophical Topics 36 (1):129-166.
    ABSTRACT. May scientists rely on substantive, a priori presuppositions? Quinean naturalists say "no," but Michael Friedman and others claim that such a view cannot be squared with the actual history of science. To make his case, Friedman offers Newton's universal law of gravitation and Einstein's theory of relativity as examples of admired theories that both employ presuppositions (usually of a mathematical nature), presuppositions that do not face empirical evidence directly. In fact, Friedman claims that the use of such presuppositions is (...)
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  21.  16
    Sami Pihlström (2006). Review: Lynn Bridgers. Contemporary Varieties of Religious Experience: James's Classic Study in Light of Resiliency, Temperament, and Trauma. Rowman & Littlefield, 2005. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (3):454-458.
    Pihlstrom's review of Lynn Bridges book on James, The Varieties of Religious Experience and contemporary varieties.
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  22. James C. S. Wernham (1988). James's Will-to-Believe Doctrine: A Heretical View. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 24 (3):423-427.
     
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  23.  84
    Guy Axtell (2001). Teaching James's “The Will to Believe”. Teaching Philosophy 24 (4):325-345.
    Many readers have viewed William James's "The Will to Believe" as his most distinctive and resonating lecture. Yet for all the scholarly attention it has received, the complexities of the "pragmatic defence," and the issues it raises concerning evidential and pragmatic reasoning are still often misunderstood. In this paper I explicate a neglected "core" argument tied closely to James's thesis statement, and provide charts and other tools useful in presenting James' lecture in the philosophy classroom. This argument, (...)
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  24. W. E. Cooper (1990). William James's Theory of Mind. Journal of the History of Philosophy (October) 571 (October):571-593.
    Neutral monist, panpsychist, naturalist, and phenomenological interpretations of James's theory of mind are canvassed. Culling the true tenets from each, I make a case for a reconciling view on the basis of a distinction between mental and proto-mental properties. The resulting interpretation is compared to two forms of panpsychism identified by T Nagel in his essay of that name.
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  25. Henry Jackman, Wittgenstein & James's Stream of Thought.
    William James has been characterized as “the major whipping boy of the later Wittgenstein,” and the currency of this impression of the relation between James and Wittgenstein is understandable. Reading Wittgenstein and his commentators can leave one with the impression that James was a badly muddled “exponent of the tradition in the philosophy of mind that [Wittgenstein] was opposing.” There have been recent attempts to resist this trend, but even these tend to focus on the affinities between (...)
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  26. Thomas Natsoulas (2001). The Concrete State: The Basic Components of James's Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (4):427-449.
    The basic components of James’s stream of consciousness are considered concretely and in a way that tends to be relatively neutral from a theoretical perspective. My ultimate goal is a general description of the states of consciousness, but I try here to be more “observational” than “theoretical” about them. Giving attention to James’s reports of his personal firsthand evidence, I proceed as though I were conversing with this most phenomenological and radically empirical of psychological authors. I disagree with (...)
     
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  27.  34
    Thomas Natsoulas (2000). On the Intrinsic Nature of States of Consciousness: Further Considerations in the Light of James's Conception. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):139-166.
    How are the states of consciousness intrinsically so that they all qualify as ?feelings? in William James?s generic sense? Only a small, propaedeutic part of what is required to address the intrinsic nature of such states can be accomplished here. I restrict my topic mainly to a certain characteristic that belongs to each of those pulses of mentality that successively make up James?s stream of consciousness. Certain statements of James?s are intended to pick out the variable ?width? (...)
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  28.  25
    Brenda Jubin (1977). 'The Spatial Quale': A Corrective to James's Radical Empiricism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (2):212-216.
    "Space," William James confessed, "is [both] a direfully difficult subject [and the] driest of subjects.'" Nonetheless, convinced that most previous accounts of space were either incoherent or mythological, he set out to describe space as it is actually experienced. His first effort, "The Spatial Quale," appeared in The Journal of Speculative Philosophy in 1879. 2 This article is historically important; as Ralph Barton Perry notes, "his peculiar view of the amplitude and eonnectedness of experience seems to have begun with (...)
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  29.  20
    Bruce Wilshire (2009). William James's Pragmatism : A Distinctly Mixed Bag. In John J. Stuhr (ed.), 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press
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  30.  3
    Ellen Kappy Suckiel (1996). Heaven's Champion: William James's Philosophy of Religion. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Suckiel offers readers a new perspective on James. For those interested in the philosophy of religion in general, and James’s views in particular, this work will be of considerable interest.
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  31.  11
    Kenneth W. Stikkers (2009). Review of Sergio Franzese, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
    Every scholar and reader of William James is aware of his frequent uses of "energy," especially in his discussions of ethics and most notably in his 1906 Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, "The Energies of Men".[1] But while other interpretations treat James's use of "energy" as merely one of his several folksy metaphors, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus is the first monograph, as its author, Sergio Franzese, rightly claims, to focus (...)
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  32.  7
    John J. Stuhr (2009). Looking Toward Last Things : James's Pragmatism Beyond its First Century. In 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press
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  33. Thomas Natsoulas (2006). On the Temporal Continuity of Human Consciousness: Is James's Firsthand Description, After All, "Inept"? Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (2):121-148.
    Contrary to James's emphasis on the sensible continuity of each personal consciousness, our purported "stream," as it presents itself to us, is not accurately described as having a flowing temporal structure; thus Strawson has argued based on how he finds his own consciousness to be. Accordingly, qua object of inner awareness, our consciousness is best characterized as constituted successively by pulses of consciousness separated in time, one from the next, by a momentary state of complete unconsciousness. It seems at (...)
     
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  34. Thomas Natsoulas (2001). The Case for Intrinsic Theory V: Some Arguments From James's Varieties. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (1):41-67.
    This and the planned next article of the present series mine the wealth of reports and astute discussions of states of consciousness contained in William James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience. Thus, I bring out further arguments in favor of the kind of understanding of consciousness4, or inner awareness, that, as it happens, James explicitly opposed in The Principles of Psychology. The alternative, appendage kind of account that James advanced there for consciousness4 stands in marked contrast to (...)
     
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  35.  10
    Ruth Weintraub (2003). A Non-Fideistic Reading of William James's "The Will to Believe". History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (1):103 - 121.
    William James’ declared intention is to oppose Clifford’s claim that it “is wrong always, everywhere, and for every one, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence”. But I argue that he is confused about his doxastic prescriptions. He isn’t primarily concerned, as he thinks he is, with the legitimacy of belief in the absence of sufficient evidence. The most important contribution of his essay is a suggestion - a highly insightful and contentious one - as to what it is to (...)
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  36. David Lamberth (2009). What to Make of James's Genetic Theory of Truth? William James Studies 4:1-20.
    This Presidential Address to the 2008 Annual Meeting of the William James Society pursues an overlooked avenue to understanding what James might have intended by his claim in Pragmatism to offer a “genetic theory of what is meant by truth.” The author argues that we can plausibly interpret this specific claim of James by appealing to Hermann Lotze’s conception of “genetic definition,” explicated in his 1874 Logik, which James read and annotated closely. The essay concludes by (...)
     
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  37.  7
    Robert J. O'Connell (1992). The Will to Believe" and James's "Deontological Streak. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 28 (4):809 - 831.
    James's ethical thought could frequently be consequentialist, but it could also on occasion show a deontological side, or "streak," as I contended in "William James on the Courage to Believe". This shows up when he speaks of the "strenuous" as against the "easy-going" moral mood, in "The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life," and it preserves the precursive intervention of our "passional natures" in "The Will to Believe" from lapsing into "wishful thinking." Toned down slightly, perhaps, in "Varieties (...)
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  38.  11
    Michael D. Bybee (1984). James's Theory of Truth as a Theory of Knowledge. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 20 (3):253 - 267.
    The object of james's theory of truth is knowledge, not truth "qua" correctness. to designate the object of his theory, james avoids using traditional english terminology for correctness but often uses diction typically reserved for knowledge. furthermore, the object of james's theory (as he describes it) cannot be distinguished from knowledge on philosophical grounds.
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  39.  5
    Sarin Marchetti & Alan Rosenberg (2014). William James's Hidden Religious Imagination: A Universe of Relations by Jeremy Carrette. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (2):313-317.
    Jeremy Carrette is one of the most interesting contemporary scholars writing on James’s philosophy of religious experience. In the present volume the author expands and deepens the scope of his previous researches by investigating the epistemological and metaphysical dimensions of James’s work on religion. The resulting interpretation is an sophisticated and ambitious one: Carrette argues that most accounts of James’s writings on religion—and of his thought as a whole—have been vitiated by a “disciplinary closure” which conceals (...)’s unbroken effort to “sustain a conversation across the disciplinary spaces of philosophy, psychology and the study of religion” . Contrary to this approach, Carrette claims how .. (shrink)
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  40.  6
    Christopher J. Broniak (1996). James's Theory of Fringes. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 32 (3):443 - 468.
    The purpose of this article is to present a more thoroughgoing account of what James means by the fringes of perceptual objects. The first section presents James's account of fringes of objects of consciousness within the context of his celebrated analogy of the stream of the fringe phenomenon for perception. It concludes by proposing a preliminary "working" definition of the concept "fringe": fringes are active bridges of associations (logical, psychological, etc.) from what is perceptually immediate but ambiguous to (...)
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  41.  2
    William S. Robinson (forthcoming). James’s Evolutionary Argument. Disputatio.
  42. P. J. Croce (1995). William James's Scientific Education. History of the Human Sciences 8 (1):9-27.
    William James's disgust for scientific arrogance was not in defiance of his early education in science, but because of it. In particular, James was influenced by the probabilistic method of Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection, especially as interpreted by Charles Sanders Peirce. Peirce, who was James's most immediate scientific influence, maintained an unresolved ambiguity between a probabilistic scientific fallibilism and a confidence in science's quest for certainty, while James emphasized the fallibilism of science as the (...)
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  43. Richard Feldman (2006). Clifford's Principle and James's Options. Social Epistemology 20 (1):19 – 33.
    In this paper I discuss William J. Clifford's principle, "It is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence" and an objection to it based on William James's contention that "Our passional nature not only lawfully may, but must, decide an option between propositions, whenever it is a genuine option that cannot by its nature be decided on intellectual grounds." I argue that on one central way of understanding the key terms, there are no genuine (...)
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  44.  22
    Caroline Sheaffer-Jones (2005). The Subject of Narration: Blanchot and Henry James's The Turn of the Screw. Colloquy 10:231.
    Writing and that which it entails are the subject of countless texts by Maurice Blanchot. In particular, Blanchot has focused on the notion of the work, or more precisely on a groundlessness or an absence of the work, which he has designated from different perspectives over the course of more than half a century. In various ways, Blanchot has conceived of the work as an affirmation of its undoing. The question of narration, often about a confrontation with death, is fundamentally (...)
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  45.  31
    Yumiko Inukai (2012). James's Answer to Hume: The Empirical Basis of the Unified Self. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):363-389.
    In the Appendix to A Treatise of Human Nature, Hume famously retracts his account of personal identity by confessing that it involves a profound problem he cannot solve, which I have elsewhere identified and called the Bundling Problem. Neither of the two possible solutions that Hume himself considers in the Appendix is a viable option for him by his own lights, which might suggest that any successful account of a unified self must go beyond the empirical framework. In this paper, (...)
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  46.  32
    Henry Jackman, James's Empirical Assumptions.
    Those sympathetic to the naturalistic side of James hope that his critique of ‘philosophical materialism’ can be separated from those elements of his thinking that are essential to his pragmatism. Such a separation is possible once we see that James’s critique of materialism grows out of his views about its incompatibility with the existence of objective values. Objective values (as James understands them) are incompatible, however, not with materialism in its most general form, but rather with materialism (...)
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  47.  31
    Linda Simon (2004). William James's Lost Souls in Ursula le Guin's Utopia. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):89-102.
    : Ursula Le Guin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" (1973), a staple of short fiction anthologies, was inspired by James's "The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life." In Le Guin's moral tale, a devastating bargain causes some citizens of Omelas to reject their apparently utopian community. Although critics have seen this rejection as a Jamesian act of pragmatism and free will, this essay examines the story in the context of "The Moral Philosopher" and other writings by (...) on pragmatism, its moral consequences, free will, and faith to refute that conclusion. I argue, instead, that James's work suggests responses that reflect his thinking about the limits and meaning of possibility and about sustaining belief in a transcendent force. (shrink)
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  48.  7
    Eleanor Rosch (2002). How to Catch James's Mystic Germ Religious Experience, Buddhist Meditation and Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (9-10):9-10.
    Within The Varieties of Religious Experience lies the germ of a truly radical idea. It is that religious experience has something important and basic to contribute to the science of psychology. Yet now, a hundred years after the publication of James's monumental work, the mainstream academic fields of psychology are no closer to considering, let alone implementing, this idea than they were in James's day. Why? Surely one aspect of this is the way in which the categories and (...)
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  49.  13
    Don Morse (2005). William James's Neglected Critique of Hegel. Idealistic Studies 35 (2-3):199-214.
    Although most scholars have ignored it, William James’s critique of Hegel, as developed in his book A Pluralistic Universe, poses a significant challenge to Hegelian thought. While not every argument James levels against Hegel is valid, and some are bogus, at least two of his arguments are highly persuasive—the charge of “vicious intellectualism” and the charge of “false unity.” As a result of leveling these charges, James escapes Hegel’s logic and is able to establish pragmatism as an (...)
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  50.  8
    Justina Torrance (2014). William James's Hidden Religious Imagination: A Universe of Relations by Jeremy Carrette. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 35 (3):264-269.
    William James began his Gifford Lectures in Edinburgh acutely conscious of his position as an American speaking to a European audience, a position that, as he observed in 1901, reversed the usual flow of academic scholarship. James would be pleased to note that the crosscurrents have continued, notably in Jeremy Carrette’s study of James’s relational metaphysics vis-à-vis religion. Carrette’s book attempts—successfully—“to read James through a pluralistic hermeneutic that seeks to include the fringes of our multidisciplinary consciousness (...)
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