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  1.  3
    James Stacey Taylor (2015). Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics. Routledge.
    _Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics_ offers a highly distinctive and original approach to the metaphysics of death and applies this approach to contemporary debates in bioethics that address end-of-life and post-mortem issues. Taylor defends the controversial Epicurean view that death is not a harm to the person who dies and the neo-Epicurean thesis that persons cannot be affected by events that occur after their deaths, and hence that posthumous harms are impossible. He then extends this argument by asserting that the (...)
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  2.  32
    James Stacey Taylor (2012). Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics. Routledge.
    Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics offers a highly distinctive and original approach to the metaphysics of death and applies this approach to contemporary debates in bioethics that address end-of-life and post-mortem issues.
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  3. James Stacey Taylor (2010). Practical Autonomy and Bioethics. Routledge.
    This is the first volume in which an account of personal autonomy is developed that both captures the contours of this concept as it is used in social philosophy and bioethics, and is theoretically grounded in, and a part of, contemporary autonomy theory. James Stacey Taylor’s account is unique as it is explicitly a political one, recognizing that the attribution of autonomy to agents is dependent in part on their relationships with others and not merely upon their own mental states. (...)
     
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  4. James Stacey Taylor (2006). Stakes and Kidneys: Why Markets in Human Body Parts Are Morally Imperative. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (225):627-629.
     
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  5.  33
    James Stacey Taylor (ed.) (2008). Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Cambridge Univ Pr.
    This is the first volume to bring together original essays that address the theoretical foundations of the concept of autonomy, as well as essays that ...
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  6.  7
    James Stacey Taylor (2015). Moral Repugnance, Moral Distress, and Organ Sales. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):312-327.
    Many still oppose legalizing markets in human organs on the grounds that they are morally repugnant. I will argue in this paper that the repugnance felt by some persons towards sales of human organs is insufficient to justify their prohibition. Yet this rejection of the view that markets in human organs should be prohibited because some persons find them to be morally repugnant does not imply that persons’ feelings of distress at the possibility of organ sales are irrational. Eduardo Rivera-Lopez (...)
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  7.  10
    James Stacey Taylor (2014). A Scandal in Geneva. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):219-234.
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  8. James Stacey Taylor (2006). Why the 'Black Market' Arguments Against Legalizing Organ Sales Fail. Res Publica 12 (2):163-178.
    One of the most widespread objections to legalizing a market in human organs is that such legalization would stimulate the black market in human organs. Unfortunately, the proponents of this argument fail to explain how such stimulation will occur. To remedy thus, two accounts of how legalizing markets in human organs could stimulate the black market in them are developed in this paper. Yet although these accounts remedy the lacuna in the anti-market argument from the black market neither of them (...)
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  9.  31
    James Stacey Taylor (2009). The Unjustified Assumptions of Organ Conscripters. HEC Forum 21 (2):115-133.
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  10.  24
    James Stacey Taylor (2002). Privacy and Autonomy: A Reappraisal. Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):587-604.
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  11.  56
    James Stacey Taylor (2004). Autonomy and Informed Consent: A Much Misunderstood Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (3):383-391.
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  12. James Stacey Taylor (2009). Practical Autonomy and Bioethics. Routledge.
    This is the first volume in which an account of personal autonomy is developed that both captures the contours of this concept as it is used in social philosophy and bioethics, and is theoretically grounded in, and a part of, contemporary autonomy theory. James Stacey Taylor’s account is unique as it is explicitly a political one, recognizing that the attribution of autonomy to agents is dependent in part on their relationships with others and not merely upon their own mental states. (...)
     
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  13.  52
    James Stacey Taylor (2005). The Myth of Posthumous Harm. American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):311 - 322.
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  14.  31
    James Stacey Taylor (2006). Personal Autonomy, Posthumous Harm, and Presumed Consent Policies for Organ Procurement. Public Affairs Quarterly 20 (4):381-404.
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  15.  60
    James Stacey Taylor (2008). Harming the Dead. Journal of Philosophical Research 33:185-202.
    It is widely accepted that a person can be harmed by events that occur after her death. The most influential account of how persons can suffer such posthumous harm has been provided by George Pitcher and Joel Feinberg. Yet, despite its influence (or perhaps because of it) the Feinberg-Pitcher account of posthumous harm has been subject to several well-known criticisms. Surprisingly, there has been no attempt to defend this account of posthumous harm against these criticisms, either by philosophers who work (...)
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  16.  20
    James Stacey Taylor (2003). Autonomy, Duress, and Coercion. Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (2):127-155.
    For the past three decades philosophical discussions of both personal autonomy and what it is for a person to “identify” with her desires have been dominated by the “hierarchical” analyses of these concepts developed by Gerald Dworkin and Harry Frankfurt. The longevity of these analyses is owed, in part, to the intuitive appeal of their shared claim that the concepts of autonomy and identification are to be analyzed in terms of hierarchies of desires, such that it is a necessary condition (...)
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  17.  29
    James Stacey Taylor (2014). Death and the Afterlife By Samuel Scheffler, Edited by Niko Kolodny. Analysis 74 (4):738-740.
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  18.  46
    James Stacey Taylor (2002). Autonomy, Constraining Options, and Organ Sales. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (3):273–285.
    We should try to alleviate it through allowing a current market in them continues to be morally condemned, usually on the grounds tha.
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  19.  31
    James Stacey Taylor (2014). Introduction: Moral and Political Issues in Vaccination. HEC Forum 26 (1):1-3.
    In 1998, The Lancet published a research paper by Andrew Wakefield that provided support to the formerly-discredited theory that the Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) vaccine could cause colitis and autism spectrum disorders (Wakefield et al. 1998). Although this paper was fully retracted in 2010 after being exposed as fraudulent, it served as a catalyst for concerns about the safety of vaccination, both the MMR vaccine in particular and vaccination in general. While the scientific consensus concerning both the MMR vaccine and (...)
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  20. James Stacey Taylor (2012). Market-Based Reforms in Health Care Are Both Practical and Morally Sound. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):537-546.
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  21.  33
    James Stacey Taylor (2005). In Praise of Big Brother: Why We Should Learn to Stop Worrying and Love Government Surveillance. Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (3):227-246.
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  22.  34
    James Stacey Taylor (2002). Privacy and Autonomy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):587-604.
  23.  3
    James Stacey Taylor (2016). Autonomy, Vote Buying, and Constraining Options. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (3).
    A common argument used to defend markets in ‘contested commodities’ is based on the value of personal autonomy. Autonomy is of great moral value; removing options from a person's choice set would compromise her ability to exercise her autonomy; hence, there should be a prima facie presumption against removing options from persons’ choice sets; thus, the burden of proof lies with those who wish to prohibit markets in certain goods. Christopher Freiman has developed a version of this argument to defend (...)
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  24.  83
    James Stacey Taylor (2005). Willing Addicts, Unwilling Addicts, and Acting of One's Own Free Will. Philosophia 33 (1-4):237-262.
  25.  22
    James Stacey Taylor (2013). Introduction: Children and Consent to Treatment. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (4):285-287.
    Some of the most difficult ethical issues that arise in clinical bioethics concern the practice of medicine upon children. Unlike adults, children are incapable of providing informed consent either to undergoing the procedures that might be performed upon them, or to taking the drugs that might benefit them. Since this is so, children—like impaired adults—often have decisions made for them by competent adults who can consent on their behalf. This leads to a series of well-known philosophical problems concerning the basis (...)
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  26.  11
    James Stacey Taylor (2012). The Point of Sale. The Philosophers' Magazine 59 (59):115-118.
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  27. James Stacey Taylor (ed.) (2005). Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Autonomy has recently become one of the central concepts in contemporary moral philosophy and has generated much debate over its nature and value. This 2005 volume brings together essays that address the theoretical foundations of the concept of autonomy, as well as essays that investigate the relationship between autonomy and moral responsibility, freedom, political philosophy, and medical ethics. Written by some of the most prominent philosophers working in these areas, this book represents research on the nature and value of autonomy (...)
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  28.  9
    James Stacey Taylor (2004). Executives, Professionals, and the Morality of Single-Sex Clubs. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (3):93-105.
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  29.  5
    Thomas Magnell, Moving Away From A. Local, Tibor R. Machan, Kevin Graham, Sharon Sytsma, Agape Sans Dieu, Jonathan Glover, Harry G. Frankfurt, James Stacey Taylor & Peter Singer (2002). Information for Contributors. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (3):601-603.
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  30. James Stacey Taylor (2007). Personal Autonomy, Organ Sales, and the Arguments From Market Coercion. In Paul Kurtz & David R. Koepsell (eds.), Science and Ethics: Can Science Help Us Make Wise Moral Judgments? Prometheus Books
     
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  31.  10
    James Stacey Taylor (2004). Autonomy and Informed Consent on the Navajo Reservation. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (4):506-516.
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  32.  42
    James Stacey Taylor (2005). Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (5):579-581.
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  33.  41
    James Stacey Taylor (2001). John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza, Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (1):125-130.
  34.  33
    James Stacey Taylor (2010). Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):534-536.
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  35.  29
    James Stacey Taylor (2010). Posthumous Interests: Legal and Ethical Perspectives. By Daniel Sperling. Metaphilosophy 41 (5):727-731.
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  36.  23
    James Stacey Taylor (2007). Autonomy, Responsibility, and Women's Obligation to Resist Sexual Harrassment. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):55-63.
    In a recent paper Carol Hay has argued for the conclusion that “a woman who has been sexually harassed has a moral obligation to confront her harasser.” I will argue in this paper that Hay’s arguments for her conclusion are unsound, for they rest on both a misconstrual of the nature of personal autonomy, and a misunderstanding of its relationship to moral responsibility. However, even though Hay’s own arguments do not support her conclusion that women have a duty to resist (...)
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  37.  21
    James Stacey Taylor (2000). Reappraising the Role of Autonomy in Medical Ethics. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 8 (1):19-33.
  38.  34
    James Stacey Taylor (2007). James Warren, Facing Death: Epicurus and His Critics. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1):109-110.
  39.  2
    James Stacey Taylor (2015). Wtf Who? HEC Forum 27 (4):287-300.
    How can healthcare systems gain self-sufficiency in their procurement and distribution of blood and blood products efficiently while maintaining a degree of relatively equitable access for patients? This is a question that, at first look, the World Health Organization has answered in detail by advocating for self-sufficiency through non-remunerated blood donation. This essay serves two purposes. First, it illustrates key differences between the WHO’s policy recommendations and the realities of healthcare. For example, it can be readily demonstrated that the WHO (...)
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  40.  26
    James Stacey Taylor (2010). Annihilation: The Sense and Significance of Death – by Christopher Belshaw. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):218-219.
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  41.  28
    James Stacey Taylor (2007). Review Essay: John Meadowcroft, the Ethics of the Market. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 19 (2):177-182.
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  42.  28
    James Stacey Taylor (2006). Introduction: Markets and Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):149-154.
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  43.  9
    James Stacey Taylor (2013). Habilitation, Health, and Agency: A Framework for Basic JusticeBy Lawrence C. Becker. Analysis 73 (3):591-592.
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  44.  21
    James Stacey Taylor (2005). Identification and Quasi-Desires. Philosophical Papers 34 (1):111-136.
    Although the standard objections to Harry Frankfurt's early hierarchical analysis of identification and its variants are well known, more recent work on identification has yet to be subjected to the same degree of scrutiny. To remedy this I develop in this paper objections to Frankfurt's most recent analysis of identification as satisfaction that he first outlined in his paper ?The Faintest Passion?. With such objections in place I show that they demonstrate that Frankfurt's analysis fails because it is based on (...)
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  45.  10
    James Stacey Taylor (2012). The Value of Autonomy and the Right to Self-Medication. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):587-588.
    In ‘Three Arguments Against Prescription Requirements’, Jessica Flanigan argues that ‘prescription drug laws violate patients' rights to self-medication’ and that patients ‘have rights to self-medication for the same reasons they have rights to refuse medical treatment according to the doctrine of informed consent , claiming that the strongest of these reasons is grounded on the value of autonomy. However, close examination of the moral value of autonomy shows that rather than being the strongest justification for the DIC, respect for the (...)
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  46.  23
    James Stacey Taylor (2002). Harry G. Frankfurt, Necessity, Volition and Love. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (1):125-130.
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  47.  14
    James Stacey Taylor (2011). Stoic Anxiolytics Revisited. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):115-117.
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  48.  7
    James Stacey Taylor (2014). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death Edited by Ben Bradley , Fred Feldman & Jens Johansson , Eds, 2013 New York, Oxford University Press Xii + 493 Pp, £95.00 (Hb). [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1):109-111.
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  49.  19
    James Stacey Taylor (2006). Why Markets in Proto-Deceptive Goods Should Be Restricted. Journal of Business Ethics 65 (4):325 - 335.
    In recent years there has been much philosophical discussion over the question of whether the prohibitions on markets in such items as human body parts and gene sequences, and services such as human reproductive labor and sex, should be lifted. Yet despite the attention paid to this issue there are been surprisingly little discussion of the question of whether markets in certain items that are currently freely traded should be restricted or eliminated. In particular, there has been little discussion of (...)
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  50.  15
    James Stacey Taylor (2010). Introduction: Hec Forum Special Issue on Privacy and Commodification. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (3):173-177.
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