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James Stacey Taylor [74]James E. Taylor [25]James Taylor [11]James S. Taylor [10]
James R. Taylor [2]James G. Taylor [2]James L. . Taylor [1]Jameson Taylor [1]

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Profile: James Stacey Taylor
Profile: James Taylor (University of Birmingham)
Profile: James Taylor
  1.  6
    James Stacey Taylor (2015). Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics. Routledge.
    _Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics_ offers a highly distinctive and original approach to the metaphysics of death and applies this approach to contemporary debates in bioethics that address end-of-life and post-mortem issues. Taylor defends the controversial Epicurean view that death is not a harm to the person who dies and the neo-Epicurean thesis that persons cannot be affected by events that occur after their deaths, and hence that posthumous harms are impossible. He then extends this argument by asserting that the (...)
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  2.  33
    James Stacey Taylor (2012). Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics. Routledge.
    Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics offers a highly distinctive and original approach to the metaphysics of death and applies this approach to contemporary debates in bioethics that address end-of-life and post-mortem issues.
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  3. James Stacey Taylor (2010). Practical Autonomy and Bioethics. Routledge.
    This is the first volume in which an account of personal autonomy is developed that both captures the contours of this concept as it is used in social philosophy and bioethics, and is theoretically grounded in, and a part of, contemporary autonomy theory. James Stacey Taylor’s account is unique as it is explicitly a political one, recognizing that the attribution of autonomy to agents is dependent in part on their relationships with others and not merely upon their own mental states. (...)
     
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  4. James Stacey Taylor (2006). Stakes and Kidneys: Why Markets in Human Body Parts Are Morally Imperative. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (225):627-629.
     
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  5.  7
    Paul J. Whalen, Hannah Raila, Randi Bennett, Alison Mattek, Annemarie Brown, James Taylor, Michelle van Tieghem, Alexandra Tanner, Matthew Miner & Amy Palmer (2013). Neuroscience and Facial Expressions of Emotion: The Role of Amygdala–Prefrontal Interactions. Emotion Review 5 (1):78-83.
    The aim of this review is to show the fruitfulness of using images of facial expressions as experimental stimuli in order to study how neural systems support biologically relevant learning as it relates to social interactions. Here we consider facial expressions as naturally conditioned stimuli which, when presented in experimental paradigms, evoke activation in amygdala–prefrontal neural circuits that serve to decipher the predictive meaning of the expressions. Facial expressions offer a relatively innocuous strategy with which to investigate these normal variations (...)
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  6.  10
    James Stacey Taylor (2015). Moral Repugnance, Moral Distress, and Organ Sales. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):312-327.
    Many still oppose legalizing markets in human organs on the grounds that they are morally repugnant. I will argue in this paper that the repugnance felt by some persons towards sales of human organs is insufficient to justify their prohibition. Yet this rejection of the view that markets in human organs should be prohibited because some persons find them to be morally repugnant does not imply that persons’ feelings of distress at the possibility of organ sales are irrational. Eduardo Rivera-Lopez (...)
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  7.  4
    James Stacey Taylor (2017). Vote Buying and Voter Preferences. Social Theory and Practice 43 (1):107-124.
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  8.  10
    James Stacey Taylor (2014). A Scandal in Geneva. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):219-234.
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  9.  57
    James Stacey Taylor (2004). Autonomy and Informed Consent: A Much Misunderstood Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (3):383-391.
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  10.  31
    James Stacey Taylor (2009). The Unjustified Assumptions of Organ Conscripters. HEC Forum 21 (2):115-133.
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  11.  24
    James Stacey Taylor (2002). Privacy and Autonomy: A Reappraisal. Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):587-604.
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  12.  2
    James Taylor (2014). Avoiding Harms to Kidney Vendors Through Legal, Regulated Markets. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (10):21-22.
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  13.  22
    James Stacey Taylor (2003). Autonomy, Duress, and Coercion. Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (2):127-155.
    For the past three decades philosophical discussions of both personal autonomy and what it is for a person to “identify” with her desires have been dominated by the “hierarchical” analyses of these concepts developed by Gerald Dworkin and Harry Frankfurt. The longevity of these analyses is owed, in part, to the intuitive appeal of their shared claim that the concepts of autonomy and identification are to be analyzed in terms of hierarchies of desires, such that it is a necessary condition (...)
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  14. James Stacey Taylor (2006). Why the 'Black Market' Arguments Against Legalizing Organ Sales Fail. Res Publica 12 (2):163-178.
    One of the most widespread objections to legalizing a market in human organs is that such legalization would stimulate the black market in human organs. Unfortunately, the proponents of this argument fail to explain how such stimulation will occur. To remedy thus, two accounts of how legalizing markets in human organs could stimulate the black market in them are developed in this paper. Yet although these accounts remedy the lacuna in the anti-market argument from the black market neither of them (...)
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  15.  54
    James Stacey Taylor (2005). The Myth of Posthumous Harm. American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):311 - 322.
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  16. Sheldon Goldstein, James Taylor, Roderich Tumulka & Nino Zanghi (2005). Are All Particles Real? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 36 (1):103-112.
    In Bohmian mechanics elementary particles exist objectively, as point particles moving according to a law determined by a wavefunction. In this context, questions as to whether the particles of a certain species are real---questions such as, Do photons exist? Electrons? Or just the quarks?---have a clear meaning. We explain that, whatever the answer, there is a corresponding Bohm-type theory, and no experiment can ever decide between these theories. Another question that has a clear meaning is whether particles are intrinsically distinguishable, (...)
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  17. James E. Taylor (2007). Hume on Miracles: Interpretation and Criticism. Philosophy Compass 2 (4):611–624.
    Philosophers continue to debate about David Hume’s case against the rationality of belief in miracles. This article clarifies semantic, epistemological, and metaphysical questions addressed in the controversy. It also explains the main premises of Hume’s argument and discusses criticisms of them. The article concludes that one’s evaluation of Hume’s argument will depend on one’s views about (a) the definitions of ’miracle’ and ’natural law’; (b) the type of reasoning one ought to employ to determine the probability that a particular miracle (...)
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  18.  3
    James Stacey Taylor (forthcoming). Markets in Votes and the Tyranny of Wealth. Res Publica:1-16.
    A standard objection to a market in political votes is that it will enable the rich politically to dominate the poor. If a market in votes was allowed then the poor would be the most likely sellers and the rich the most likely buyers. The rich would thus accumulate the votes of the poor, and so the candidates elected and the policies passed would represent only their interests and not those of the electorate as a whole. To ensure that the (...)
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  19.  60
    James Stacey Taylor (2008). Harming the Dead. Journal of Philosophical Research 33:185-202.
    It is widely accepted that a person can be harmed by events that occur after her death. The most influential account of how persons can suffer such posthumous harm has been provided by George Pitcher and Joel Feinberg. Yet, despite its influence (or perhaps because of it) the Feinberg-Pitcher account of posthumous harm has been subject to several well-known criticisms. Surprisingly, there has been no attempt to defend this account of posthumous harm against these criticisms, either by philosophers who work (...)
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  20.  32
    James Stacey Taylor (2006). Personal Autonomy, Posthumous Harm, and Presumed Consent Policies for Organ Procurement. Public Affairs Quarterly 20 (4):381-404.
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  21.  41
    James E. Taylor (1990). Epistemic Justification and Psychological Realism. Synthese 85 (2):199 - 230.
    The main thesis of this paper is that it is not possible to determine the nature of epistemic justification apart from scientific psychological investigation. I call this view the strong thesis of methodological psychologism. Two sub-theses provide the primary support for this claim. The first sub-thesis is that no account of epistemic justification is correct which requires for the possession of at least one justified belief a psychological capacity which humans do not have. That is, the correct account of epistemic (...)
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  22. James Stacey Taylor (2012). Market-Based Reforms in Health Care Are Both Practical and Morally Sound. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):537-546.
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  23.  46
    James Stacey Taylor (2002). Autonomy, Constraining Options, and Organ Sales. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (3):273–285.
    We should try to alleviate it through allowing a current market in them continues to be morally condemned, usually on the grounds tha.
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  24.  8
    James Stacey Taylor (2016). Autonomy, Vote Buying, and Constraining Options. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (4).
    A common argument used to defend markets in ‘contested commodities’ is based on the value of personal autonomy. Autonomy is of great moral value; removing options from a person's choice set would compromise her ability to exercise her autonomy; hence, there should be a prima facie presumption against removing options from persons’ choice sets; thus, the burden of proof lies with those who wish to prohibit markets in certain goods. Christopher Freiman has developed a version of this argument to defend (...)
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  25.  6
    James Stacy Taylor (2016). Logrolling, Earmarking, and Vote Buying. Philosophia 44 (3):905-913.
    In an important and provocative paper Christopher Freiman recently has defended the view that vote-buying should be legal in democratic societies. Freiman offers four arguments in support of this claim: that vote buying would be ex ante beneficial to both the buyers and sellers of votes; that voters enjoy wide discretion in how they use their votes, and so this should extend to selling them; that vote markets would lead to electoral outcomes that better reflect voters’ preferences; and that vote-buying (...)
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  26.  32
    Aaron Spital & James S. Taylor (2008). In Defense of Routine Recovery of Cadaveric Organs: A Response to Walter Glannon. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3):337-343.
    Walter Glannon argues that our proposal for routine recovery of transplantable cadaveric organs is unacceptable After carefully reviewing his counterarguments, we conclude that, although some of them have merit, none are sufficiently strong to warrant abandoning this plan. Below we respond to each of Glannon's concerns.
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  27.  23
    James Stacey Taylor (2012). The Point of Sale. The Philosophers' Magazine 59 (59):115-118.
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  28.  38
    James Stacey Taylor (2002). Privacy and Autonomy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):587-604.
  29.  30
    James Stacey Taylor (2014). Death and the Afterlife By Samuel Scheffler, Edited by Niko Kolodny. Analysis 74 (4):738-740.
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  30.  32
    James Stacey Taylor (2014). Introduction: Moral and Political Issues in Vaccination. HEC Forum 26 (1):1-3.
    In 1998, The Lancet published a research paper by Andrew Wakefield that provided support to the formerly-discredited theory that the Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) vaccine could cause colitis and autism spectrum disorders (Wakefield et al. 1998). Although this paper was fully retracted in 2010 after being exposed as fraudulent, it served as a catalyst for concerns about the safety of vaccination, both the MMR vaccine in particular and vaccination in general. While the scientific consensus concerning both the MMR vaccine and (...)
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  31.  35
    Taylor James Stacey (ed.) (2005). Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Autonomy has recently become one of the central concepts in contemporary moral philosophy and has generated much debate over its nature and value. This 2005 volume brings together essays that address the theoretical foundations of the concept of autonomy, as well as essays that investigate the relationship between autonomy and moral responsibility, freedom, political philosophy, and medical ethics. Written by some of the most prominent philosophers working in these areas, this book represents research on the nature and value of autonomy (...)
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  32.  36
    James Stacey Taylor (2005). In Praise of Big Brother: Why We Should Learn to Stop Worrying and Love Government Surveillance. Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (3):227-246.
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  33.  17
    James E. Taylor (1995). Plantinga on Epistemic Warrant. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):421-426.
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  34.  86
    James Stacey Taylor (2005). Willing Addicts, Unwilling Addicts, and Acting of One's Own Free Will. Philosophia 33 (1-4):237-262.
  35.  22
    James Stacey Taylor (2013). Introduction: Children and Consent to Treatment. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (4):285-287.
    Some of the most difficult ethical issues that arise in clinical bioethics concern the practice of medicine upon children. Unlike adults, children are incapable of providing informed consent either to undergoing the procedures that might be performed upon them, or to taking the drugs that might benefit them. Since this is so, children—like impaired adults—often have decisions made for them by competent adults who can consent on their behalf. This leads to a series of well-known philosophical problems concerning the basis (...)
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  36.  46
    James E. Taylor & Alvin Plantinga (1991). Plantinga's Proper Functioning Analysis of Epistemic Warrant. Philosophical Studies 64 (2):185 - 202.
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  37.  5
    Thomas Magnell, Moving Away From A. Local, Tibor R. Machan, Kevin Graham, Sharon Sytsma, Agape Sans Dieu, Jonathan Glover, Harry G. Frankfurt, James Stacey Taylor & Peter Singer (2002). Information for Contributors. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (3):601-603.
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  38.  10
    James Stacey Taylor (2004). Autonomy and Informed Consent on the Navajo Reservation. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (4):506-516.
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  39.  12
    James E. Taylor (2008). Evidence and Faith. Faith and Philosophy 25 (2):216-221.
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  40.  22
    James L. Taylor & Sarit Larry (2013). Introduction – Heidegger and Politics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (9):849-851.
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  41. Sheldon Goldstein, James Taylor, Roderich Tumulka & Nino Zanghı` (2005). Are All Particles Real? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (1):103-112.
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  42.  25
    James E. Taylor (1993). Scepticism and the Nature of Knowledge. Philosophia 22 (1-2):3-27.
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  43.  10
    James Taylor (2010). Ben Golder and Peter FitzPatrick: Foucault's Law Routledge, New York, 2009, 143 Pp, Isbn 0415424542 (Pbk), Us $35.95. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):569-574.
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  44.  10
    James R. Taylor (2009). The Communicative Construction of Community : Authority and Organizing. In Annalisa Sannino, Harry Daniels & Kris D. Gutierrez (eds.), Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press 228--239.
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  45.  9
    James E. Taylor (1990). Kelly on the Logic of Eternal Knowledge. Modern Schoolman 67 (2):141-147.
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  46. James Stacey Taylor (2007). Personal Autonomy, Organ Sales, and the Arguments From Market Coercion. In Paul Kurtz & David R. Koepsell (eds.), Science and Ethics: Can Science Help Us Make Wise Moral Judgments? Prometheus Books
     
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  47.  43
    James Stacey Taylor (2005). Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (5):579-581.
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  48.  9
    James E. Taylor (1993). Conceptual Analysis and the Essence of Knowledge. American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):15 - 26.
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  49.  41
    James Stacey Taylor (2001). John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza, Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (1):125-130.
  50.  33
    James Stacey Taylor (2010). Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):534-536.
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