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Profile: James Stacey Taylor
Profile: James Taylor (University of Birmingham)
  1. James Stacey Taylor (forthcoming). A Scandal in Geneva in Advance. International Journal of Applied Philosophy.
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  2. James Taylor (2014). Avoiding Harms to Kidney Vendors Through Legal, Regulated Markets. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (10):21-22.
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  3. James Stacey Taylor (2014). Death and the Afterlife By Samuel Scheffler, Edited by Niko Kolodny. Analysis 74 (4):738-740.
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  4. James Stacey Taylor (2014). Introduction: Moral and Political Issues in Vaccination. HEC Forum 26 (1):1-3.
    In 1998, The Lancet published a research paper by Andrew Wakefield that provided support to the formerly-discredited theory that the Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) vaccine could cause colitis and autism spectrum disorders (Wakefield et al. 1998). Although this paper was fully retracted in 2010 after being exposed as fraudulent, it served as a catalyst for concerns about the safety of vaccination, both the MMR vaccine in particular and vaccination in general. While the scientific consensus concerning both the MMR vaccine and (...)
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  5. James Stacey Taylor (2014). Introduction: The Limits of Consent and Conscience in Medicine. HEC Forum 26 (3):181-183.
    In recent years a concern with the value of personal autonomy has come to dominate discussions in medical ethics. This emphasis on autonomy has naturally led to discussions of what criteria must be met for a person to be autonomous, or to be autonomous with respect to her decisions, her actions, or those of her desires that motivate her to make or to perform the decisions or the actions that she makes or does. It has also led to discussions of (...)
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  6. James Stacey Taylor (2014). Public Moralities and Markets in Organs. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (3):223-227.
    Schweda and Schicktanz argue that the debate over the ethics of using financial incentives to procure human transplant organs rests on socioempirical premises that need to be critically assessed. They contend that once this is achieved a completely new perspective on the debate should be adopted, with organ donation being viewed primarily as a reciprocal social interaction between donor and recipient. This paper challenges this conclusion, arguing that rather than supporting a new perspective on the debate over the commercial procurement (...)
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  7. James Stacey Taylor (2014). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death Edited by Ben Bradley , Fred Feldman & Jens Johansson , Eds, 2013 New York, Oxford University Press Xii + 493 Pp, £95.00 (Hb). [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1):109-111.
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  8. James E. Taylor (2013). Introduction to Conceptual Foundations. In Jeanine Diller & Asa Kasher (eds.), Models of God and Alternative Ultimate Realities. Springer. 13--17.
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  9. James E. Taylor (2013). The New Atheism and Models of God: The Case of Richard Dawkins. In Jeanine Diller & Asa Kasher (eds.), Models of God and Alternative Ultimate Realities. Springer. 735--744.
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  10. James L. Taylor & Sarit Larry (2013). Introduction – Heidegger and Politics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (9):849-851.
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  11. James S. Taylor (2013). Organ Acquisition and Applied Metaphysics. Res Publica 19 (2):199-203.
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  12. James S. Taylor (2013). Organ Acquisition and Applied Metaphysics: TM Wilkinson: Ethics and the Acquisition of Organs. Oxford University Press, New York, 2011 (). Res Publica 19 (2):199-203.
     
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  13. James Stacey Taylor (2013). Habilitation, Health, and Agency: A Framework for Basic JusticeBy Lawrence C. Becker. Analysis 73 (3):591-592.
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  14. James Stacey Taylor (2013). Introduction: Children and Consent to Treatment. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (4):285-287.
    Some of the most difficult ethical issues that arise in clinical bioethics concern the practice of medicine upon children. Unlike adults, children are incapable of providing informed consent either to undergoing the procedures that might be performed upon them, or to taking the drugs that might benefit them. Since this is so, children—like impaired adults—often have decisions made for them by competent adults who can consent on their behalf. This leads to a series of well-known philosophical problems concerning the basis (...)
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  15. James Stacey Taylor (ed.) (2013). The Metaphysics and Ethics of Death: New Essays. Oup Usa.
    The Metaphysics and Ethics of Death brings together original essays that both address the fundamental questions of the metaphysics of death and explore the relationship between those questions and some of the areas of applied ethics in which they play a central role.
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  16. Paul J. Whalen, Hannah Raila, Randi Bennett, Alison Mattek, Annemarie Brown, James Taylor, Michelle van Tieghem, Alexandra Tanner, Matthew Miner & Amy Palmer (2013). Neuroscience and Facial Expressions of Emotion: The Role of Amygdala–Prefrontal Interactions. Emotion Review 5 (1):78-83.
    The aim of this review is to show the fruitfulness of using images of facial expressions as experimental stimuli in order to study how neural systems support biologically relevant learning as it relates to social interactions. Here we consider facial expressions as naturally conditioned stimuli which, when presented in experimental paradigms, evoke activation in amygdala–prefrontal neural circuits that serve to decipher the predictive meaning of the expressions. Facial expressions offer a relatively innocuous strategy with which to investigate these normal variations (...)
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  17. James Stacey Taylor (2012). Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics. Routledge.
    Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics offers a highly distinctive and original approach to the metaphysics of death and applies this approach to contemporary debates in bioethics that address end-of-life and post-mortem issues.
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  18. James Stacey Taylor (2012). The Carelessness of Affordable Care. Hastings Center Report 42 (5):24-27.
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  19. James Stacey Taylor (2012). The Point of Sale. The Philosophers' Magazine 59 (59):115-118.
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  20. James Stacey Taylor (2012). The Value of Autonomy and the Right to Self-Medication. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):587-588.
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  21. James E. Taylor (2011). Hume's Problem of Induction. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
  22. James E. Taylor & Stefanie Rocknak (2011). Hume and the Problem of Induction. In Michael Bruce Steven Barbone (ed.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 174--179.
  23. James Stacey Taylor (2011). Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):534-536.
  24. James Stacey Taylor (2011). Stoic Anxiolytics Revisited. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):115-117.
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  25. James Taylor (2010). Ben Golder and Peter Fitzpatrick: Foucault's Law. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):569-574.
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  26. James Taylor (2010). Ben Golder and Peter FitzPatrick: Foucault's Law Routledge, New York, 2009, 143 Pp, Isbn 0415424542 (Pbk), Us $35.95. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):569-574.
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  27. James E. Taylor (2010). Rationalism, Platonism and God – Michael Ayers. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):189-192.
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  28. James E. Taylor (2010). The Clarity of God's Existence: The Ethics of Belief After the Enlightenment. By Owen Anderson. Heythrop Journal 51 (3):513-514.
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  29. James Stacey Taylor (2010). Annihilation: The Sense and Significance of Death – by Christopher Belshaw. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):218-219.
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  30. James Stacey Taylor (2010). Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):534-536.
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  31. James Stacey Taylor (2010). Introduction: Hec Forum Special Issue on Privacy and Commodification. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (3):173-177.
    The papers in this special thematic issue of HEC Forum critically and carefully explore key issues at the intersection of patient privacy and commodification. For example, should hospitals be required to secure a person’s consent to any possible uses to which his discarded body parts might be put after his treatment or should it only be concerned with securing his informed consent to his treatment? Should a hospital be required to raise the possibility of the commodification of such (patient-discarded) body (...)
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  32. James Stacey Taylor (2010). Posthumous Interests: Legal and Ethical Perspectives. By Daniel Sperling. Metaphilosophy 41 (5):727-731.
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  33. James Taylor (2009). Forward. In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Creating a Global Dialogue on Value Inquiry: Papers From the Xxii Congress of Philosophy (Rethinking Philosophy Today). Edwin Mellen Press.
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  34. James R. Taylor (2009). The Communicative Construction of Community : Authority and Organizing. In Annalisa Sannino, Harry Daniels & Kris D. Gutierrez (eds.), Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press. 228--239.
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  35. James S. Taylor (2009). Nothing in the Dark. In Noël Carroll & Lester H. Hunt (eds.), Philosophy in the Twilight Zone. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  36. James Stacey Taylor (2009). Practical Autonomy and Bioethics. Routledge.
    This is the first volume in which an account of personal autonomy is developed that both captures the contours of this concept as it is used in social philosophy and bioethics, and is theoretically grounded in, and a part of, contemporary autonomy theory. James Stacey Taylor’s account is unique as it is explicitly a political one, recognizing that the attribution of autonomy to agents is dependent in part on their relationships with others and not merely upon their own mental states. (...)
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  37. James Stacey Taylor (2009). Review of Todd May, Death. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (10).
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  38. James Stacey Taylor (2009). The Unjustified Assumptions of Organ Conscripters. HEC Forum 21 (2):115-133.
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  39. Jameson Taylor (2009). Beyond Nature. Review of Metaphysics 63 (2):415-454.
    Karol Wojtyla’s The Acting Person is devoted to articulating how the experience and structure of action reveals that the person is an objective/subjective unity whose self-fulfillment is achieved by moral praxis. Wojtyla is attempting to harmonize the Boethian-Thomistic definition of man as an individual substance of a rational nature with a modern, phenomenological vision of man as an incommunicable subject. In doing so, he adopts what might be termed a “maximalist” interpretation of Boethius’ definition, an interpretation that understands the basic (...)
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  40. Aaron Spital & James S. Taylor (2008). In Defense of Routine Recovery of Cadaveric Organs: A Response to Walter Glannon. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (03):337-343.
    Walter Glannon argues that our proposal for routine recovery (also known as conscription) of transplantable cadaveric organs is unacceptable After carefully reviewing his counterarguments, we conclude that, although some of them have merit, none are sufficiently strong to warrant abandoning this plan. Below we respond to each of Glannon's concerns.
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  41. James E. Taylor (2008). Evidence and Faith. Faith and Philosophy 25 (2):216-221.
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  42. James S. Taylor (2008). Human Flourishing and Voluntarist Self-Direction. In Aeon J. Skoble (ed.), Reading Rasmussen and Den Uyl: Critical Essays on Norms of Liberty. Lexington Books.
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  43. James Stacey Taylor (2008). Harming the Dead. Journal of Philosophical Research 33:185-202.
    It is widely accepted that a person can be harmed by events that occur after her death. The most influential account of how persons can suffer such posthumous harm has been provided by George Pitcher and Joel Feinberg. Yet, despite its influence (or perhaps because of it) the Feinberg-Pitcher account of posthumous harm has been subject to several well-known criticisms. Surprisingly, there has been no attempt to defend this account of posthumous harm against these criticisms, either by philosophers who work (...)
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  44. James Stacey Taylor (2008). Market Incentives and Health Care Reform. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (5):498-514.
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  45. James Stacey Taylor (ed.) (2008). Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Cambridge Univ Pr.
    This is the first volume to bring together original essays that address the theoretical foundations of the concept of autonomy, as well as essays that ...
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  46. James E. Taylor (2007). Hume on Miracles: Interpretation and Criticism. Philosophy Compass 2 (4):611–624.
    Philosophers continue to debate about David Hume’s case against the rationality of belief in miracles. This article clarifies semantic, epistemological, and metaphysical questions addressed in the controversy. It also explains the main premises of Hume’s argument and discusses criticisms of them. The article concludes that one’s evaluation of Hume’s argument will depend on one’s views about (a) the definitions of ’miracle’ and ’natural law’; (b) the type of reasoning one ought to employ to determine the probability that a particular miracle (...)
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  47. James E. Taylor (2007). Response to Ted Peters' “Models of God”. Philosophia 35 (3-4):289-292.
    In Models of God, Ted Peters discusses a methodology for formulating and evaluating models of God, surveys nine models, and proposes one that he entitles Eschatological Panentheism. This paper provides critical comments on Peters’ methodological claims, taxonomy of models of God, and specific proposal. This paper has been delivered during APA Pacific 2007 Mini-Conference on Models of God.Both Peters’ Models of God and these comments were presented at the Models of God mini-conference at the Pacific Division Meetings of the American (...)
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  48. James Stacey Taylor (2007). Autonomy, Responsibility, and Women's Obligation to Resist Sexual Harrassment. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):55-63.
    In a recent paper Carol Hay has argued for the conclusion that “a woman who has been sexually harassed has a moral obligation to confront her harasser.” I will argue in this paper that Hay’s arguments for her conclusion are unsound, for they rest on both a misconstrual of the nature of personal autonomy, and a misunderstanding of its relationship to moral responsibility. However, even though Hay’s own arguments do not support her conclusion that women have a duty to resist (...)
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  49. James Stacey Taylor (2007). James Warren, Facing Death: Epicurus and His Critics. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1):109-110.
  50. James Stacey Taylor (2007). Personal Autonomy, Organ Sales, and the Arguments From Market Coercion. In Paul Kurtz & David R. Koepsell (eds.), Science and Ethics: Can Science Help Us Make Wise Moral Judgments? Prometheus Books.
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