22 found
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James W. Felt [26]James Wright Felt [1]
  1.  12
    James W. Felt (1987). The Acts of Our Being. New Scholasticism 61 (4):477-479.
  2.  11
    James W. Felt (1984). God's Choice. Faith and Philosophy 1 (4):370-377.
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  3.  11
    James W. Felt (1968). Whitehead and the Bifurcation of Nature. Modern Schoolman 45 (4):285-298.
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  4.  9
    James W. Felt (1987). Whitehead Und der Prozessbegriff/Whitehead and The Idea of Process. Process Studies 16 (2):149-151.
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  5.  13
    James W. Felt (1978). Philosophic Understanding and the Continuity of Becoming. International Philosophical Quarterly 18 (4):375-393.
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  6.  13
    James W. Felt (2006). Reason and Reality. Review of Metaphysics 59 (3):673-675.
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  7.  20
    James W. Felt (1987). Faces of Time. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 62 (4):414-422.
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  8.  9
    James W. Felt (1995). Person and Being. Review of Metaphysics 48 (4):890-891.
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  9. James W. Felt (1994). Making Sense of Your Freedom: Philosophy for the Perplexed. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Written for general readers and students, this book provides an accessible and brief metaphysical defense of freedom. James W. Felt, S.J., invites his audience to consider that we are responsible for what we do precisely because we do it freely. His perspective runs counter to the philosophers who argue that the freedom humans feel in their actions is merely an illusion. Felt argues in detail that there are no compelling reasons for thinking we are not free, and very strong ones (...)
     
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  10.  16
    Reto Luzius Fetz & James W. Felt (1990). Aristotelian and Whiteheadian Conceptions of Actuality. Process Studies 19 (1):15-27.
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  11.  6
    James W. Felt (1999). Intensity. Process Studies 28 (3/4):354-356.
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  12.  3
    James W. Felt (1994). Relational Idealism and the Great Deception of Sense. Modern Schoolman 71 (4):305-316.
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  13.  14
    James W. Felt (2000). Proposal for a Thomistic-Whiteheadian Metaphysics of Becoming. International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (2):253-263.
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  14.  6
    James W. Felt (2006). Second-Best Realism and Functional Pragmatism. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (4):439-444.
    The functional pragmatism advocated by Nicholas Rescher derives from the conviction that we have no strict evidence for the existence of extramental reality and therefore must postulate it in order to make any sense of truth, communication, and scientific projects. This essay challenges Rescher’s starting point by arguing that the reason extramental reality cannot be argued to is because it is immediately evident. But then to claim that one must postulate it is to adopt only a second-best kind of realism.
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  15.  12
    James W. Felt (1983). Impossible Worlds. International Philosophical Quarterly 23 (3):251-265.
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  16.  11
    James W. Felt (1985). Whitehead's Misconception of 'Substance' in Aristotle. Process Studies 14 (4):224-236.
  17.  9
    James W. Felt (1971). Invitation to a Philosophic Revolution. New Scholasticism 45 (1):87-109.
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  18.  8
    Reto Luzius Fetz & James W. Felt (1991). In Critique of Whitehead. Process Studies 20 (1):1-9.
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  19.  3
    James W. Felt (1996). Radical Realism. International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (4):500-502.
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  20. James W. Felt (2007). Aims: A Brief Metaphysics for Today. University of Notre Dame Press.
    In _Aims: A Brief Metaphysics for Today_, James W. Felt turns his attention to combining elements of Thomas Aquinas's metaphysics, especially its deep ontology, with Alfred North Whitehead's process philosophy to arrive at a new possibility for metaphysics. In his distinctive style, Felt conciselypulls together the strands of epistemology, ontology, and teleology, synthesizing these elements into his own “process-enriched Thomism.” _Aims_ does not simply discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each philosopher’s position, but blends the two into a cohesive argument (...)
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  21. James W. Felt (2009). Adventures in Unfashionable Philosophy. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Throughout more than forty years of distinguished teaching and scholarship, James W. Felt has been respected for the clarity and economy of his prose and for his distinctive approach to philosophy. The seventeen essays collected in __Adventures in Unfashionable Philosophy__ reflect Felt's encounters with fundamental philosophical problems in the spirit of traditional metaphysics but updated with modern concerns. Among the main themes of the volume are: the enrichment of Thomistic philosophy through engagement with modern philosophers, Whitehead and Bergson, in particular; (...)
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  22. James W. Felt (2000). Coming to Be: Toward a Thomistic-Whiteheadian Metaphysics of Becoming. State University of New York Press.
    Synthesizes Thomistic and Whiteheadian metaphysics.
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