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  1.  15
    James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo (eds.) (1995). Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism. University of Hawai'i Press.
    Zen Buddhist Attitudes to War HIRATA Seiko IN ORDER FULLY TO UNDERSTAND the standpoint of Zen on the question of nationalism, one must first consider the ...
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  2.  8
    James W. Heisig (2011). tANAbe hAjime ANd the hiNt of A dhARmic fiNALity. Comprendre 13 (2):55-69.
    The Japanese philosopher, Tanabe Hajime is taken up as an example of a thinker who, like the conference question, straddles intellectual histories East and West. Of all the Kyoto School philosophers, it was he who took history most seriously. He not only criticized Kantian, Hegelian, and Marxist notions of teleology and the modern scientific myth of "progress" on their own ground, but went on to counter these views of history with a logic of emptiness grounded in Buddhist philosophy. The essay (...)
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  3.  2
    James W. Heisig (2003). Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies. Buddhist-Christian Studies 23 (1):139-139.
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  4. James W. Heisig (2001). Philosophers of Nothingness an Essay on the Kyoto School. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  5.  30
    James W. Heisig (2010). East Asian Philosophy and the Case Against Perfect Translations. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):81-90.
    In this essay the author argues for rethinking the canons of translation of East Asian philosophical texts in order to draw Western philosophers more deeply into conversation with them.
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  6.  9
    James W. Heisig (2005). Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies. Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):235-235.
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  7.  29
    James W. Heisig (2000). Non-I and Thou: Nishida, Buber, and the Moral Consequences of Self-Actualization. Philosophy East and West 50 (2):179-207.
    Ten years after Buber published his "I and Thou," the Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitarō published a book of the same title, knowing only Buber's name but nothing of his ideas. A comparison of these two works suggests certain fundamental differences between philosophies of being and philosophies of nothingness regarding the nature of human relationships. In particular, it points to the inherent tendency of the latter to remove moral responsibility and social consciousness to high but ineffective levels of abstraction.
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  8.  5
    James W. Heisig (2012). Nothing and Nowhere East and West: The Hint of a Common Ground. Angelaki 17 (3):17-30.
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  9.  5
    James W. Heisig (2008). In Memoriam: Jan Van Bragt (1928–2007). Buddhist-Christian Studies 28 (1):141-144.
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  10.  6
    James W. Heisig (2013). An Inquiry Into the Good and Nishida's Missing Basho. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):237 - 251.
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  11.  5
    James W. Heisig (2005). The 2004 Meeting of the Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies. Buddhist-Christian Studies 25 (1):153-153.
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  12.  4
    James W. Heisig (2006). Book Review: Steffen Döll, Wozu also suchen? Zur Einführung in das Denken von Ueda Shizuteru. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 33 (1):208-211.
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  13. James W. Heisig (2008). The Cultural Disarmament of Philosophy. Universitas Philosophica 50:17-40.
    This article protests against the claim that philosophy as such is universal, because it often ambiguously speaks more of a universality of cultural dominance than of a properly philosophical universality including other philosophical modes of language and thought in the commitment to a universal search for truth. It stresses the need of a deliberate decision to de- Westernizing the philosophical forum, and illustrates how the Kyoto School does seriously take up this challenge facing, among others, the heavy iron bars of (...)
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  14.  1
    James W. Heisig (2005). Reviews: Defending Japan's Pacific War: The Kyoto School Philosophers and Post-White Power. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 32:163-166.
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  15. Asanga Tilakaratne, James W. Heisig, Timothy W. Richardson, Mee-Jeong Park, Sang-Suk Oh, Joowon Suh, Mary Shin Kim, Young-Mee Cho, Hyo-Sang Lee & Carol Schulz (2013). Theravada Buddhism: The View of the Elders. Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
     
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  16.  1
    James W. Heisig (2003). Reviews: L'Oriente di Heidegger, Nichilismo e vacuità del Sé. A cura di Carlo Saviani. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 30:159-162.
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  17.  1
    James W. Heisig (1982). Book Review: Early Buddhism and Christianity: A Comparative Study of the Founders' Authority, the Community, and the Discipline by Chai-Shin Yu. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 9:320-322.
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  18. James W. Heisig (2005). Reviews: Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, the Kyoto School, and Co-Prosperity. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 32:178-180.
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  19. James W. Heisig (1990). The Religious Philosophy of the Kyoto School: An Overview. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (1):51-81.
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  20. James W. Heisig, Taitetsu Unno & International Symposium on Metanoetics (1990). The Religious Philosophy of Tanabe Hajime the Metanoetic Imperative. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  21. James W. Heisig (forthcoming). The Third Conference of the Tōzai Shūkyō Kōryū Gakkai. Buddhist-Christian Studies.
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  22. Yamamoto Seisaku & James W. Heisig (eds.) (1991). Nishida Kitaro. University of California Press.
    In recent years several books by major figures in Japan's modern philosophical tradition have appeared in English, exciting readers by their explorations of the borderlands between philosophy and religion. What has been wanting, however, is a book in a Western language to elucidate the life and thought of Nishida Kitaro, Japan's first philosopher of world stature and the originator of what has come to be called the Kyoto School. No one is more qualified to write such a book than Nishitani (...)
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  23. Yoshinori Takeuchi, Valdo Viglielmo & James W. Heisig (eds.) (1990). Philosophy as Metanoetics. University of California Press.
    A milestone in Japan's post-war philosophical thought and a dramatic turning point in Tanabe's own philosophy, _Philosophy as Metanoetics_ calls for nothing less than a complete and radical rethinking of the philosophical task itself. It is a powerful, original work, showing vast erudition in all areas of both Eastern and Western thought.
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  24. Takeuchi Yoshinori & James W. Heisig (1985). The Heart of Buddhism: In Search of the Timeless Spirit of Primitive Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 35 (2):221-223.
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