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Profile: James Warren
  1. James Warren (forthcoming). Coping with Choices to Die, by C. G. Prado. Mind:fzu021.
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  2. James Warren (forthcoming). Stoic Dialectic. Classical Review.
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  3. James P. Warren (forthcoming). Bristol Molly: Sexuality, Power, Silence. Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature.
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  4. Frisbee Sheffield & James Warren (eds.) (2013). Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Routledge.
    The Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy is a collection of new essays on the philosophy and philosophers of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Written by a cast of international scholars, it covers the full range of ancient philosophy from the sixth century BC to the sixth century AD and beyond. There are dedicated discussions of the major areas of the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle together with accounts of their predecessors and successors. The contributors also address various problems of (...)
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  5. James Warren (2013). Comparing Lives in Plato, Laws 5. Phronesis-a Journal for Ancient Philosophy 58 (4):319 - 346.
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  6. James Warren (2013). Philosophy: Places, Institutions, Character. In Frisbee Sheffield & James Warren (eds.), Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Routledge. 393.
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  7. James Warren (2011). Pleasure, Plutarch's Non Posse and Plato's Republic. Classical Quarterly 61 (01):278-293.
  8. James Warren (2011). Socrates And The Patients: Republic IX, 583c-585a. Phronesis 56 (2):113-137.
    Republic IX 583c-585a presents something surprisingly unusual in ancient accounts of pleasure and pain: an argument in favour of the view that there are three relevant hedonic states: pleasure, pain, and an intermediate. The argument turns on the proposal that a person's evaluation of their current state may be misled by a comparison with a prior or subsequent state. The argument also refers to `pure' and anticipated pleasures. The brief remarks in the Republic may appear cursory or clumsy in comparison (...)
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  9. James Warren (2011). What God Didn't Know (Sextus Empiricus AM IX 162-166). In Diego E. Machuca (ed.), New Essays on Ancient Pyrrhonism. Brill. 126--41.
  10. James Warren, John Ferguson, Robert R. Wellman, Lynn E. Rose, David Gallop, David Savan, Wolf Deicke, Robert G. Hoerber & I. M. Lonie (2011). Brill Online Books and Journals. Phronesis 56 (2).
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  11. James Warren (2010). (M.M.) Sassi Gli inizi della filosofia: in Grecia. Turin: Bollati Boringhieri, 2009. Pp. 307. €19. 9788833919744. Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:271-272.
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  12. James Warren (2010). Plato on the Pleasures and Pains of Knowing. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 39.
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  13. James Warren (2009). Aristotle on Speusippus on Eudoxus on Pleasure. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 36:249-81.
     
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  14. James Warren (2009). Introduction. In , The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press.
  15. James Warren (2009). Philosophy (G.) Roskam 'Live Unnoticed': Λάθε Βιώσαζ. On the Vicissitudes of an Epicurean Doctrine. (Philosophia Antiqua 111). Leiden: Brill, 2007. Pp. Xii + 233. €89. 9789004161719. (G.) Roskam ACommentary on Plutarch's De Latenter Vivendo. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2007. Pp. 279. €34.50. 9789058676030. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:243-.
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  16. James Warren (2009). Removing Fear. In , The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press.
  17. James Warren (ed.) (2009). The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press.
    The volume emphasises the interrelation of the different areas of the Epicureans' philosophical interests while also drawing attention to points of interpretative difficulty and controversy.
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  18. James Warren (2008). On Defending Socrates. Think 6 (17-18):99-101.
    James Warren responds to Sandis's preceding article.
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  19. James Warren (2008). Philosophy (J.) Delattre Ed. Sur le Contre les professeurs de Sextus Empiricus. Villeneuve d'Ascq: Editions du Conseil scientifique de l'Université Charles-de-Gaulle-Lille 3, 2006. Pp. 159. €17. 9782844670779. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:284-.
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  20. James Warren (2008). Stoicism and Emotion (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 633-634.
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  21. James Warren (2007). Anaxagoras on Perception, Pleasure, and Pain. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 33:19-54.
  22. James Warren (2007). Koch (R.) Comment Peut-on Être Dieu? La Secte d'Épicure. Pp. 303, Ills. Paris: Éditions Belin, 2005. Paper, €26. ISBN: 978-2-7011-4024-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02).
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  23. James Warren (2007). Lucretius and Greek Philosophy. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 19--33.
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  24. James Warren (2007). Pt. 1. Antiquity. Lucretius and Greek Philosophy. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  25. James Warren (2007). Philosophy (C.) Tamagnone Ateismo filosofico nel mondo antico. Religione, naturalismo, materialismo, atomismo, scienza. La nascita della filosofia atea. Clinamen, 2005. Pp. 304. 24.70. 8884110771. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:249-.
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  26. Epicurus On Plato'S. & James Warren (2006). Psychic Disharmony: Philoponus. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Volume Xxx: Summer 2006 30:235.
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  27. James Warren (2006). Epicureans and the Present Past. Phronesis 51 (4):362-387.
    This essay offers a reading of a difficult passage in the first book of Lucretius' "De Rerum Natura" in which the poet first explains the Epicurean account of time and then responds to a worry about the status of the past (1.459-82). It identifies two possible readings of the passage, one of which is compatible with the claim that the Epicureans were presentists about the past. Other evidence, particularly from Cicero "De Fato", suggests that the Epicureans maintained that all true (...)
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  28. James Warren (2006). Frede (D.), Inwood (B.) (Edd.) Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. Pp. Xii + 353. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Cased, £50, US$85. ISBN: 0-521-84181-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):315-.
  29. James Warren (2006). Lee (M.-K.) Epistemology After Protagoras: Responses to Relativism in Plato, Aristotle, and Democritus . Pp. Xii + 291. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005. Cased, £45. ISBN: 0-19-926222-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):59-.
  30. James Warren (2006). O'Keefe (T.) Epicurus on Freedom. Pp. X + 175. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Cased, £45, US$70. ISBN: 0-521-84696-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):313-.
  31. James Warren (2006). Psychic Disharmony: Philoponus and Epicurus on Plato's Phaedo. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 30:235-259.
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  32. John C. Fortney, Matthew L. Maciejewski, James J. Warren & James F. Burgess Jr (2005). Does Improving Geographic Access to VA Primary Care Services Impact Patients' Patterns of Utilization and Costs? Inquiry 42 (1):29-42.
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  33. James Warren (2005). Lucretius and Philodemus A. Monet (Ed.): Le Jardin Romain. Épicurisme Et Poésie à Rome. Mélanges Offerts à Mayotte Bollack . Pp. 376. Villeneuve d'Ascq: Centre de Gestion de l'Édition Scientifique, Université Charles-de-Gaulle—Lille 3, 2003. Paper, €28. ISBN: 2-84467-057-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):116-.
  34. James Warren (2005). Review: Le jardin romain. Epicurisme et poesie a Rome. Melanges offerts a Mayotte Bollack. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (1):116-118.
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  35. James Warren (2004). Ancient Atomists on the Plurality of Worlds. Classical Quarterly 54 (02):354-365.
  36. James Warren (2004). Ancient Wisdom. The Philosophers' Magazine 28 (28):90-90.
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  37. James Warren (2004). Bios Theoretikos A. Grilli: Vita Contemplativa. Il Problema Della Vita Contemplativa Nel Mondo Greco-Romano . (Philosophica, Testi E Studi 6.) Pp. 292. Brescia: Paideia, 2002. Cased, €29.50. Isbn: 88-394-0642-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):425-.
  38. James Warren (2004). Facing Death: Epicurus and His Critics. Clarendon Press.
    The ancient philosophical school of Epicureanism tried to argue that death is "nothing to us." Were they right? James Warren provides a comprehensive study and articulation of the interlocking arguments against the fear of death found not only in the writings of Epicurus himself, but also in Lucretius' poem De rerum natura and in Philodemus' work De morte. These arguments are central to the Epicurean project of providing ataraxia (freedom from anxiety) and therefore central to an understanding of Epicureanism as (...)
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  39. James Warren (2003). Stoic dialectic J. -b. gourinat: La dialectique Des stoïciens . Pp. 386. Paris: Librairie philosophique J. vrin, 2000. Paper, €38.11/frs. 250. isbn: 2-7116-1322-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):63-.
  40. James Warren (2003). Sextus Empiricus and the Tripartition of Time. Phronesis 48 (4):313-343.
    A discussion of the arguments against the existence of time based upon its tripartition into past, present, and future found in SE M 10.197-202. It uncovers Sextus' major premises and assumptions for these arguments and, in particular, criticises his argument that the past and future do not exist because the former is no longer and the latter is not yet. It also places these arguments within the larger structure of Sextus' arguments on time in SE M 10 and considers these (...)
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  41. James Warren (2003). Walking the Talk. The Philosophers' Magazine 21 (21):58-58.
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  42. James Warren (2002). Epicurus and Democritean Ethics: An Archaeology of Ataraxia. Cambridge University Press.
    The Epicurean philosophical system has enjoyed much recent scrutiny, but the question of its philosophical ancestry remains largely neglected. It has often been thought that Epicurus owed only his physical theory of atomism to the fifth-century BC philosopher Democritus, but this study finds that there is much in his ethical thought which can be traced to Democritus. It also finds important influences on Epicurus in Democritus' fourth-century followers such as Anaxarchus and Pyrrho, and in Epicurus' disagreements with his own Democritean (...)
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  43. James Warren (2002). Later epicureans M. Erler (ed.): Epikureismus in der späten republik und kaiserzeit. Akten der 2. tagung der Karl und Gertrud Abel stiftung vom. 30 september–3 oktober 1998 im würzburg . Pp. 316. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner verlag, 2000. Cased, dm 136. Isbn: 3-515-07494-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (01):55-.
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  44. James Warren (2002). Socratic Scepticism in Plutarch's Adversas Colotem. Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 23 (2):333-356.
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  45. James Warren (2001). Epicurus and the Pleasures of the Future. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 21:135-79.
     
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  46. James Warren (2001). Pyrrho R. Bett: Pyrrho, His Antecedents and His Legacy . Pp. X + 264. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Cased, £35. ISBN: 0-19-825065-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (02):293-.
  47. James Ian Warren (2001). Socratic Suicide. Journal of Hellenic Studies 121:91-106.
    When is it rational to commit suicide? More specifically, when is it rational for a Platonist to commit suicide, and more worryingly, is it ever not rational for a Platonist to commit suicide? If the Phaedo wants us to learn that the soul is immortal, and that philosophy is a preparation for a state better than incarnation, then why does it begin with a discussion defending the prohibition of suicide? In the course of that discussion, Socrates offers (but does not (...)
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  48. James Warren (2000). C. Horn: Antike Lebenskunst: Glück Und Moral von Sokrates Bis Zu den Neuplatonikern . Pp. 271. Munich: C. H. Beck, 1998. Paper, DM 24. ISBN: 3-406-42071-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):334-.
  49. James Warren (2000). Epicurean Immortality. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 18:231-61.
     
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  50. James Ian Warren (2000). Diogenes "Epikourios": Keep Taking the Tablets. Journal of Hellenic Studies 120:144-148.
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