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Profile: James Wilberding (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)
  1. James Wilberding (forthcoming). Teratology in Neoplatonism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    Teratogenesis poses a real problem for all those who wish to see the natural world as a success story, and this includes the Neoplatonists. On their view even ordinary biological reproduction is governed by principles ultimately derived from intelligible Forms. Thus, the generation of terata would seem to call into question the very efficacy of these intelligible principles in the sensible world, since these would seem to be cases in which matter has gotten the upper hand over the intelligible. Although (...)
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  2. James Wilberding (2012). Curbing One's Appetites in the Republic. In Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain (eds.), Plato and the Divided Self. Cambridge UP.
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  3. James Wilberding (2012). Curbing One's Appetites in Plato's Republic'. In Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain (eds.), Plato and the Divided Self. Cambridge University Press. 128--149.
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  4. James Wilberding (2012). Neoplatonists on 'Spontaneous' Generation. In James Wilberding & Christoph Horn (eds.), Neoplatonism and the Philosophy of Nature. Oxford UP.
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  5. James Wilberding & Christoph Horn (eds.) (2012). Neoplatonism and the Philosophy of Nature. Oxford UP.
    This volume dispels the idea that Platonism was an otherworldly enterprise which neglected the study of the natural world. Leading scholars examine how the Platonists of late antiquity sought to understand and explain natural phenomena: their essays offer a new understanding of the metaphysics of Platonism, and its place in the history of science.
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  6. James Wilberding (2011). Intelligible Kinds and Natural Kinds in Plotinus. Études Platoniciennes 8:53-73.
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  7. James Wilberding (2011). Porphyry. To Gaurus on How Embryos Are Ensouled and on What is in Our Power. Bristol Classical Press.
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  8. James Wilberding (2009). Plotinus and the Presocratics: A Philosophical Study of Presocratic Influences in Plotinus' “Enneads”. Philosophical Review 118 (4):543-546.
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  9. James Wilberding (2009). Plato's Two Forms of Second-Best Morality. Philosophical Review 118 (3):351-374.
    Plato presents a hierarchy of five cities, each representing a structural arrangement of the soul. The timocratic soul, characterized by its governance by spirit and its consequent desire for esteem and aversion to shame, is ranked as the second-best kind of soul, though this should strike us as surprising since the timocratic figure would seem to be duplicitous, intellectually passive, and at the mercy of the fortuitous opinions of others. This timocrat's position thus raises problems concerning the intrinsic value of (...)
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  10. James Wilberding (2009). Review of Pauliina Remes, Plotinus on Self: The Philosophy of the 'We'. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).
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  11. Timothy J. Crowley, Malcolm Heath, Gwenaëlle Aubry, Serge Mouraviev, Ofra Magidor, Karen M. Nielsen & James Wilberding (2008). Markus Kohl Substancehood and Subjecthood in Aristotle's Categories......... 152 Sean Kelsey The Place of I 7 in the Argument of Physics I.......................... 180. [REVIEW] Phronesis 53:449-450.
     
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  12. James Wilberding (2008). Automatic Action in Plotinus. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 34:443-77.
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  13. James Wilberding (2008). Porphyry and Plotinus on the Seed. Phronesis 53 (s 4-5):406-432.
    Porphyry's account of the nature of seeds can shed light on some less appreciated details of Neoplatonic psychology, in particular on the interaction between individual souls. The process of producing the seed and the conception of the seed offer a physical instantiation of procession and reversion, activities that are central to Neoplatonic metaphysics. In an act analogous to procession, the seed is produced by the father's nature, and as such it is ontologically inferior to the father's nature. Thus, the seed (...)
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  14. James Wilberding (2007). Karamanolis (G.E.) Plato and Aristotle in Agreement? Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. Pp. X + 419. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2006. Cased, £50. ISBN: 978-0-19-926456-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02).
  15. James Wilberding (2006). The Philosophy of the Commentators, 200-600 AD: A Sourcebook. Vol. I, Psychology (with Ethics and Religion). Vol. II, Physics. Vol. III, Logic and Metaphysics (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):470-471.
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  16. James Wilberding (2006). Philoponus. Against Proclus on the Eternity of the World (Books 12-18). Duckworth.
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  17. James Wilberding (2006). Plotinus' Cosmology: A Study of Ennead Ii.1 (40): Text, Translation, and Commentary. Oxford University Press.
    In Ennead II.1 (40) Plotinus is primarily concerned to argue for the everlastingness of the universe, the heavens, and the heavenly bodies as individual substances. Here he must grapple both with the philosophical issue of personal identity through time and with the rich tradition of cosmology which pitted the Platonists against the Aristotelians and Stoics. What results is a historically informed cosmological sketch explaining the constitution of the heavens as well as sublunar and celestial motion. This book contains an extensive (...)
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  18. James Wilberding (2006). Plotinus' Cosmology: A Study of Ennead Ii. Oxford University Press.
    In Ennead II.1 (40) Plotinus is primarily concerned to argue for the everlastingness of the universe, the heavens, and the heavenly bodies as individual substances. Here he must grapple both with the philosophical issue of personal identity through time and with the rich tradition of cosmology which pitted the Platonists against the Aristotelians and Stoics. What results is a historically informed cosmological sketch explaining the constitution of the heavens as well as sublunar and celestial motion. This book contains an extensive (...)
     
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  19. James Wilberding (2004). Prisoners and Puppeteers in the Cave. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 27:117-39.
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