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James O. Young [74]James Young [14]James P. Young [14]James E. Young [4]
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Profile: James O. Young (University of Victoria)
  1.  6
    James Young (2016). Dominic McIver Lopes, Beyond Art. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 36 (2):83-85.
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  2. James O. Young (2014). The Poverty of Musical Ontology. Journal of Music and Meaning 13:1-19.
    Aaron Ridley posed the question of whether results in the ontology of musical works would have implications for judgements about the interpretation, meaning or aesthetic value of musical works and performances. His arguments for the conclusion that the ontology of musical works have no aesthetic consequences are unsuccessful, but he is right in thinking (in opposition to Andrew Kania and others) that ontological judgements have no aesthetic consequences. The key to demonstrating this conclusion is the recognition that ontological judgments are (...)
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  3.  23
    James P. Young (1987). Contemporary Political Thinkers. International Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):98-99.
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  4. James O. Young (2009). Truth, Correspondence and Deflationism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):563-575.
    The central claim of this essay is that many deflationary theories of truth are variants of the correspondence theory of truth. Essential to the correspondence theory of truth is the proposal that objective features of the world are the truthmakers of statements. Many advocates of deflationary theories (including F. P. Ramsay, P. F. Strawson and Paul Horwich) remain committed to this proposal. Although T-sentences (statements of the form “ s is true iff p ”) are presented by advocates of deflationary (...)
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  5.  58
    James O. Young & Carl Matheson (2000). The Metaphysics of Jazz. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):125-133.
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  6.  92
    James O. Young (1988). The Concept of Authentic Performance. British Journal of Aesthetics 28 (3):228-238.
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  7.  9
    Ivan Gaskell, A. W. Eaton, James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (2009). Do Subaltern Artifacts Belong in Art Museums? In James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.), The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley
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  8.  68
    James O. Young (2005). Profound Offense and Cultural Appropriation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (2):135–146.
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  9. James O. Young (2002). The Slingshot Argument and the Correspondence Theory of Truth. Acta Analytica 17 (2):121-132.
    The correspondence theory of truth holds that each true sentence corresponds to a discrete fact. Donald Davidson and others have argued (using an argument that has come to be known as the slingshot) that this theory is mistaken, since all true sentences correspond to the same “Great Fact.” The argument is designed to show that by substituting logically equivalent sentences and coreferring terms for each other in the context of sentences of the form ‘P corresponds to the fact that P’ (...)
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  10.  17
    James P. Young (1981). The Politics of Imperfection. International Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):108-108.
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  11.  25
    James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.) (2009). The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley.
    Through a combination of empirical research and philosophical analysis in essays by leading experts in the social sciences, this book undertakes a comprehensive and systematic investigation of the moral and aesthetic questions that arise ...
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  12.  12
    James O. Young (2015). The Ancient and Modern System of the Arts. British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):1-17.
    Paul Oskar Kristeller famously argued that the modern ‘ system of the arts ’ did not emerge until the mid-eighteenth century, in the work of Charles Batteux. On this view, the modern conception of the fine arts had no parallel in the ancient world, the middle-ages or the modern period prior to Batteux. This paper argues that Kristeller was wrong. The ancient conception of the imitative arts completely overlaps with Batteux’s fine arts : poetry, painting, music, sculpture, and dance. Writers (...)
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  13.  95
    James O. Young (2009). Relativism, Standards and Aesthetic Judgements. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (2):221 – 231.
    This paper explores the various available forms of relativism concerning aesthetic judgement and contrasts them with aesthetic absolutism. Two important distinctions are drawn. The first is between subjectivism (which relativizes judgements to an individual's sentiments or feelings) and the relativization of aesthetic judgements to intersubjective standards. The other is between relativism about aesthetic properties and relativism about the truth-values of aesthetic judgements. Several plausible forms of relativism about aesthetic properties are on offer, but relativism about the truth-values of aesthetic judgements (...)
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  14.  62
    James O. Young (2001). Art and Knowledge. Routledge.
    Art and Knowledge argues that the experience of art is so rewarding because it can be an important source of knowledge about ourselves and our relation to each other and to the world. He argues that all the arts, including music, are importantly representational. This kind of representation is fundamentally different from that found in the sciences, but it can provide insights as important and profound as that available from the sciences. Art and Knowledge is an exceptionally clear and interesting, (...)
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  15.  76
    James Young (2011). The Ontology of Musical Works: A Philosophical Pseudo-Problem. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):284-297.
    A bewildering array of accounts of the ontology of musical works is available. Philosophers have held that works of music are sets of performances, abstract, eternal sound-event types, initiated types, compositional action types, compositional action tokens, ideas in a composer’s mind and continuants that perdure. This paper maintains that questions in the ontology of music are, in Rudolf Carnap’s sense of the term, pseudo-problems. That is, there is no alethic basis for choosing between rival musical ontologies. While we have no (...)
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  16. James O. Young, The Coherence Theory of Truth. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  17.  13
    James A. Young (1940). Richard Crashaw. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):523-524.
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  18.  6
    James O. Young (2002). Semantic Challenges to Realism. Dialogue 41 (2):405-406.
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  19.  87
    James O. Young (1999). The Cognitive Value of Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (1):41-54.
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  20.  72
    James E. Young (1997). Toward a Received History of the Holocaust. History and Theory 36 (4):21–43.
    In this article, I examine both the problem of so-called postmodern history as it relates to the Holocaust and suggest the ways that Saul Friedlander's recent work successfully mediates between the somewhat overly polemicized positions of "relativist" and "positivist" history. In this context, I find that in his search for an adequately self-reflexive historical narrative for the Holocaust, Hayden White's proposed notion of "middle-voicedness" may recommend itself more as a process for eyewitness writers than as a style for historians after (...)
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  21.  16
    James E. Young (1992). The Counter-Monument: Memory Against Itself in Germany Today. Critical Inquiry 18 (2):267-296.
    One of the contemporary results of Germany’s memorial conundrum is the rise of its “counter-monuments”: brazen, painfully self-conscious memorial spaces conceived to challenge the very premises of their being. On the former site of Hamburg’s greatest synagogue, at Bornplatz, Margrit Kahl has assembled an intricate mosaic tracing the complex lines of the synagogue’s roof construction: a palimpsest for a building and community that no longer exist. Norbert Radermacher bathes a guilty landscape in Berlin’s Neukölln neighborhood with the inscribed light of (...)
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  22.  39
    James O. Young (1989). Destroying Works of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):367-373.
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  23.  19
    James O. Young (1997). Aesthetic Antirealism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (1):119-134.
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  24.  9
    James P. Young (1989). Public Life and Late Capitalism. International Studies in Philosophy 21 (3):124-125.
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  25.  62
    James O. Young (1999). Art, Knowledge, and Exemplification. British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (2):126-137.
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  26.  57
    James O. Young (2010). Art and the Educated Audience. Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (3):29-42.
    When writing about art, aestheticians tend to focus on the work of art and on the artist who produces it. When they refer to audiences, they typically speak only of the effect that the artwork has on its audience. Aestheticians pay little, if any, attention to the important active role that an audience plays in the workings of a healthy art world. My goal in this essay is to do something to end the neglect of the audience. I will focus (...)
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  27. James-O. Young (1987). Global Anti-Realism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47:641-647.
    DUMMETT HAS BEEN CONCERNED WITH SHOWING HOW ONE MIGHT GIVE\nAN ANTI-REALIST ACCOUNT OF RESTRICTED CLASSES OF SENTENCES.\nTHIS PAPER ARGUES THAT IT IS POSSIBLE TO GIVE AN\nANTI-REALIST ACCOUNT OF ALL CLASSES OF SENTENCES. THAT IS,\nIN THE CASE OF NO CLASSES OF SENTENCES DOES TRUTH TRANSCEND\nWHAT CAN BE WARRANTED. THE KEY TO GLOBAL ANTI-REALISM IS\nREPLACING DUMMETT'S EMPIRICISM WITH A COHERENTIST ACCOUNT\nOF WARRANT. THE AUTHOR POINTS OUT THAT COLIN McGINN'S\nARGUMENT AGAINST GLOBAL ANTI-REALISM FAILS.
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  28.  40
    James O. Young (1994). Should White Men Play the Blues? Journal of Value Inquiry 28 (3):415-424.
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  29.  28
    James O. Young (2012). Resemblance, Convention, and Musical Expressiveness. The Monist 95 (4):587-605.
    Peter Kivy and Stephen Davies developed an influential and convincing account of what features of music cause listeners to hear it as expressive of emotion. Their view (the resemblance theory) holds that music is expressive of some emotion when it resembles human expressive behaviour. Some features of music, they believe, are expressive of emotion because of conventional associations. In recent years, Kivy has rejected the resemblance theory without adopting an alternative. This essay argues that Kivy has been unwise to abandon (...)
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  30.  18
    James O. Young & Susan Haley (2009). 'Nothing Comes From Nowhere': Reflections on Cultural Appropriation as the Representation of Other Cultures. In James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.), The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley 268.
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  31.  6
    James P. Young (1992). The Evolution of Rights in Liberal Theory. International Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):136-137.
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  32.  56
    James O. Young (1995). Artworks and Artworlds. British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (4):330-337.
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  33.  14
    James O. Young (1992). Still More in Defense of Colorization. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (3):245-248.
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  34. James P. Young (2001). Henry Adams the Historian as Political Theorist. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  35.  6
    James O. Young (1997). Relativism and the Evaluation of Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 31 (1).
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  36.  23
    James P. Young (1975). Marx and Mill. International Studies in Philosophy 7:258-259.
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  37.  12
    James P. Young (1992). Philosophy, “The Federalist,” and the Constitution. International Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):150-150.
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  38. James O. Young (2013). Music and the Representation of Emotion. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (2):332-348.
     
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  39.  6
    James P. Young (1997). Recasting Conservatism. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):105-106.
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  40.  42
    James O. Young (2006). Art, Authenticity and Appropriation. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (3):455-476.
    It is often suggested that artists from one culture (outsiders) cannot successfully employ styles, stories, motifs and other artistic content developed in the context of another culture. I call this suggestion the aesthetic handicap thesis and argue against it. Cultural appropriation can result in works of high aesthetic value.
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  41.  5
    James P. Young (1986). Natural Right Theories. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (3):104-105.
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  42.  12
    James O. Young (1995). Questioning Foundations: Truth, Subjectivity, and Culture. History of European Ideas 21 (5):718-719.
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  43.  11
    James O. Young (1986). The Immorality of Applied Ethics. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):37-43.
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  44.  33
    James O. Young (1995). Between Rock and a Harp Place. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1):78-81.
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  45.  35
    James O. Young (1991). Key, Temperament and Musical Expression. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (3):235-242.
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  46.  9
    James P. Young (1988). Hannah Arendt. International Studies in Philosophy 20 (3):125-126.
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  47.  29
    James O. Young (1987). Global Anti-Realism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (4):641-647.
  48.  4
    James P. Young (2004). Democracy's Discontents. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):281-282.
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  49.  29
    James O. Young (2005). The ‘Great Divide’ in Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):175-184.
    Several prominent philosophers of music, including Lydia Goehr and Peter Kivy, maintain that the experience of music changed drastically in about 1800. According to the great divide hypothesis, prior to 1800 audiences often scarcely attended to music. At other times, music was appreciated as part of social, civic, or religious ceremonies. After the great divide, audiences began to appreciate music as an exclusive object of aesthetic experience. The great divide hypothesis is false. The musicological record reveals that prior to the (...)
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  50.  10
    James O. Young (2003). Singer, Irving. Feeling and Imagination: The Vibrant Flux of Our Existence. Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):180-181.
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