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Profile: James O. Young (University of Victoria)
  1. James O. Young (2014). Critique of Pure Music. Oup Oxford.
    James O. Young seeks to explain why we value music so highly. He draws on the latest psychological research to argue that music is expressive of emotion by resembling human expressive behaviour. The representation of emotion in music gives it the capacity to provide psychological insight--and it is this which explains a good deal of its value.
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  2. James O. Young (2014). Mag Uidhir, Christy, Ed. Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press, Viii + 310 Pp., $75.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):218-220.
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  3. James O. Young (2014). The Poverty of Musical Ontology. Journal of Music and Meaning 13:1-19.
    Aaron Ridley posed the question of whether results in the ontology of musical works would have implications for judgements about the interpretation, meaning or aesthetic value of musical works and performances. His arguments for the conclusion that the ontology of musical works have no aesthetic consequences are unsuccessful, but he is right in thinking (in opposition to Andrew Kania and others) that ontological judgements have no aesthetic consequences. The key to demonstrating this conclusion is the recognition that ontological judgments are (...)
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  4. James O. Young (2013). Music and the Representation of Emotion. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (2):332-348.
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  5. James O. Young (2012). Resemblance, Convention, and Musical Expressiveness. The Monist 95 (4):587-605.
    Peter Kivy and Stephen Davies developed an influential and convincing account of what features of music cause listeners to hear it as expressive of emotion. Their view (the resemblance theory) holds that music is expressive of some emotion when it resembles human expressive behaviour. Some features of music, they believe, are expressive of emotion because of conventional associations. In recent years, Kivy has rejected the resemblance theory without adopting an alternative. This essay argues that Kivy has been unwise to abandon (...)
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  6. James Young (2011). The Ontology of Musical Works: A Philosophical Pseudo-Problem. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):284-297.
    A bewildering array of accounts of the ontology of musical works is available. Philosophers have held that works of music are sets of performances, abstract, eternal sound-event types, initiated types, compositional action types, compositional action tokens, ideas in a composer’s mind and continuants that perdure. This paper maintains that questions in the ontology of music are, in Rudolf Carnap’s sense of the term, pseudo-problems. That is, there is no alethic basis for choosing between rival musical ontologies. While we have (...)
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  7. James O. Young (2011). Roger Scruton , Understanding Music: Philosophy and Interpretation . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 31 (1):67-79.
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  8. James O. Young (2010). Art and the Educated Audience. Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (3):29-42.
    When writing about art, aestheticians tend to focus on the work of art and on the artist who produces it. When they refer to audiences, they typically speak only of the effect that the artwork has on its audience. Aestheticians pay little, if any, attention to the important active role that an audience plays in the workings of a healthy art world. My goal in this essay is to do something to end the neglect of the audience. I will focus (...)
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  9. James O. Young (2010). Jeanette Bicknell, Why Music Moves Us Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 29 (5):316-317.
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  10. James O. Young (2010). Review of Noël Carroll, Art in Three Dimensions. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (12).
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  11. Conrad G. Brunk & James O. Young (2009). 'The Skin Off Our Backs' Appropriation of Religion. In James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.), The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley. 93.
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  12. Ivan Gaskell, A. W. Eaton, James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (2009). Do Subaltern Artifacts Belong in Art Museums? In James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.), The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley.
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  13. James O. Young (2009). Jeanette Bicknell, Why Music Moves Us. Philosophy in Review 29 (5):316.
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  14. James O. Young (2009). Relativism, Standards and Aesthetic Judgements. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (2):221 – 231.
    This paper explores the various available forms of relativism concerning aesthetic judgement and contrasts them with aesthetic absolutism. Two important distinctions are drawn. The first is between subjectivism (which relativizes judgements to an individual's sentiments or feelings) and the relativization of aesthetic judgements to intersubjective standards. The other is between relativism about aesthetic properties and relativism about the truth-values of aesthetic judgements. Several plausible forms of relativism about aesthetic properties are on offer, but relativism about the truth-values of aesthetic judgements (...)
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  15. James O. Young (2009). Truth, Correspondence and Deflationism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):563-575.
    The central claim of this essay is that many deflationary theories of truth are variants of the correspondence theory of truth. Essential to the correspondence theory of truth is the proposal that objective features of the world are the truthmakers of statements. Many advocates of deflationary theories (including F. P. Ramsay, P. F. Strawson and Paul Horwich) remain committed to this proposal. Although T-sentences (statements of the form “ s is true iff p ”) are presented by advocates of deflationary (...)
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  16. James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.) (2009). The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley.
    Through a combination of empirical research and philosophical analysis in essays by leading experts in the social sciences, this book undertakes a comprehensive and systematic investigation of the moral and aesthetic questions that arise ...
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  17. James O. Young & Susan Haley (2009). 'Nothing Comes From Nowhere': Reflections on Cultural Appropriation as the Representation of Other Cultures. In James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.), The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley. 268.
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  18. James O. Young (2008). Cultural Appropriation and the Arts. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  19. James O. Young, The Coherence Theory of Truth. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  20. James O. Young (2007). Cultures and Cultural Property. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):111–124.
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  21. James O. Young (2006). Art, Authenticity and Appropriation. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (3):455-476.
    It is often suggested that artists from one culture (outsiders) cannot successfully employ styles, stories, motifs and other artistic content developed in the context of another culture. I call this suggestion the aesthetic handicap thesis and argue against it. Cultural appropriation can result in works of high aesthetic value.
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  22. James O. Young (2006). Dominic McIver Lopes, Sight and Sensibility: Evaluating Pictures Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (4):270-272.
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  23. James O. Young (2006). Jenefer Robinson, Deeper Than Reason: Emotion and its Role in Literature, Music, and Art Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (5):374-376.
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  24. James O. Young (ed.) (2005). Aesthetics. Routledge.
    This four volume set brings together both classic and contemporary writings to provide a comprehensive collection of the most important essays on the subject. All of the various artistic genres are addressed, with sections on film, dance and architecture as well as music, literature and the visual arts. With a new introduction by the editor to guide the reader through the volumes, this major new work will provide student and researcher alike with key writings on aesthetics in one convenient, unique (...)
     
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  25. James O. Young (2005). Profound Offense and Cultural Appropriation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (2):135–146.
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  26. James O. Young (2005). The ‘Great Divide’ in Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):175-184.
    Several prominent philosophers of music, including Lydia Goehr and Peter Kivy, maintain that the experience of music changed drastically in about 1800. According to the great divide hypothesis, prior to 1800 audiences often scarcely attended to music. At other times, music was appreciated as part of social, civic, or religious ceremonies. After the great divide, audiences began to appreciate music as an exclusive object of aesthetic experience. The great divide hypothesis is false. The musicological record reveals that prior to the (...)
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  27. James O. Young (2004). Berys Gaut and Paisley Livingston, Eds., The Creation of Art: New Essays in Philosophical Aesthetics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (2):107-109.
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  28. James P. Young (2004). Democracy's Discontents. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):281-282.
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  29. John J. Hamre, James G. Young & Mark Shurtleff (2003). From Smallpox to SARS: Is the Past Prologue? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (s4):13-20.
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  30. James O. Young (2003). Singer, Irving. Feeling and Imagination: The Vibrant Flux of Our Existence. Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):180-181.
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  31. James O. Young (2002). Semantic Challenges to Realism: Dummett and Putnam Mark Quentin Gardiner Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2000, X + 267 Pp., $85.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (02):405-.
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  32. James O. Young (2002). Semantic Challenges to Realism. Dialogue 41 (2):405-406.
     
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  33. James O. Young (2002). The Slingshot Argument and the Correspondence Theory of Truth. Acta Analytica 17 (2):121-132.
    The correspondence theory of truth holds that each true sentence corresponds to a discrete fact. Donald Davidson and others have argued (using an argument that has come to be known as the slingshot) that this theory is mistaken, since all true sentences correspond to the same “Great Fact.” The argument is designed to show that by substituting logically equivalent sentences and coreferring terms for each other in the context of sentences of the form ‘P corresponds to the fact that P’ (...)
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  34. James O. Young (2001). Art and Knowledge. Routledge.
    Art and Knowledge argues that the experience of art is so rewarding because it can be an important source of knowledge about ourselves and our relation to each other and to the world. He argues that all the arts, including music, are importantly representational. This kind of representation is fundamentally different from that found in the sciences, but it can provide insights as important and profound as that available from the sciences. Art and Knowledge is an exceptionally clear and interesting, (...)
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  35. James O. Young (2001). Authenticity in Performance. In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
     
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  36. James O. Young (2001). Global Anti-Realism: A Metaphilosophical Inquiry Andrew Joseph Cortens Boulder, CO: Westview, 2000, X + 174 Pp., $59.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 40 (04):814-.
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  37. James O. Young & Carl Matheson (2000). The Metaphysics of Jazz. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):125-133.
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  38. James O. Young (1999). Art, Knowledge, and Exemplification. British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (2):126-137.
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  39. James O. Young (1999). The Cognitive Value of Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (1):41-54.
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  40. Marita Sturken & James E. Young (1998). Monuments. In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. 3--272.
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  41. James E. Young (1998). The Holocaust as Vicarious Past: Art Spiegelman's "Maus" and the Afterimages of History. Critical Inquiry 24 (3):666.
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  42. James E. Young (1997). Toward a Received History of the Holocaust. History and Theory 36 (4):21–43.
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  43. James O. Young (1997). Aesthetic Antirealism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (1):119-134.
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  44. James O. Young (1997). Defining Art Responsibly. British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (1):57-65.
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  45. James O. Young (1997). Relativism and the Evaluation of Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 31 (1).
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  46. James P. Young (1997). Recasting Conservatism. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):105-106.
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  47. James O. Young (1996). Inquiry in the Arts and Sciences. Philosophy 71 (276):255 - 273.
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  48. James O. Young (1996). Relativism and Anti-Realism. Ratio 9 (1):68-77.
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  49. James O. Young (1995). Artworks and Artworlds. British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (4):330-337.
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