12 found
Sort by:
  1. Bernadette M. Fitzgibbon, Jamie Ward & Peter G. Enticott (2014). The Neural Underpinnings of Vicarious Experience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  2. Michael J. Banissy & Jamie Ward (2013). Mechanisms of Self-Other Representations and Vicarious Experiences of Touch in Mirror-Touch Synesthesia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  3. Jamie Pritchard, Nicolas Rothen, Daniel Coolbear & Jamie Ward (2013). Enhanced Associative Memory for Colour (but Not Shape or Location) in Synaesthesia. Cognition 127 (2):230-234.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Nicolas Rothen, Elias Tsakanikos, Beat Meier & Jamie Ward (2013). Coloured Letters and Numbers (CLaN): A Reliable Factor-Analysis Based Synaesthesia Questionnaire. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):1047-1060.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jamie Ward, Vera Burckhardt & Henning Holle (2013). Contagious Scratching: Shared Feelings but Not Shared Body Locations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  6. Jamie Ward, Peter Hovard, Alicia Jones & Nicolas Rothen (2013). Enhanced Recognition Memory in Grapheme-Color Synaesthesia for Different Categories of Visual Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Memory has been shown to be enhanced in grapheme-colour synaesthesia, and this enhancement extends to certain visual stimuli (that don’t induce synaesthesia) as well as stimuli comprised of graphemes (which do). Previous studies have used a variety of testing procedures to assess memory in synaesthesia (e.g. free recall, recognition, associative learning) making it hard to know the extent to which memory benefits are attributable to the stimulus properties themselves, the testing method, participant strategies, or some combination of these factors. In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Henning Holle, Christian Obermeier, Maren Schmidt-Kassow, Angela D. Friederici, Jamie Ward & Thomas C. Gunter (2012). Gesture Facilitates the Syntactic Analysis of Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Recent research suggests that the brain routinely binds together information from gesture and speech. However, most of this research focused on the integration of representational gestures with the semantic content of speech. Much less is known about how other aspects of gesture, such as emphasis, influence the interpretation of the syntactic relations in a spoken message. Here, we investigated whether beat gestures alter which syntactic structure is assigned to ambiguous spoken German sentences. The P600 component of the Event Related Brain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Henning Holle, Michael Banissy, Thomas Wright, Natalie Bowling & Jamie Ward (2011). “That's Not a Real Body”: Identifying Stimulus Qualities That Modulate Synaesthetic Experiences of Touch. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):720-726.
  9. Jamie Ward & Peter Meijer (2010). Visual Experiences in the Blind Induced by an Auditory Sensory Substitution Device. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):492-500.
    In this report, the phenomenology of two blind users of a sensory substitution device – “The vOICe” – that converts visual images to auditory signals is described. The users both report detailed visual phenomenology that developed within months of immersive use and has continued to evolve over a period of years. This visual phenomenology, although triggered through use of The vOICe, is likely to depend not only on online visualization of the auditory signal but also on the users’ previous (albeit (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Noam Sagiv, Julia Simner, James Collins, Brian Butterworth & Jamie Ward (2006). What is the Relationship Between Synaesthesia and Visuo-Spatial Number Forms? Cognition 101 (1):114-28.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Noam Sagiv & Jamie Ward (2006). Cross-Modal Interactions: Lessons From Synesthesia. In Susana Martinez-Conde, S. L. Macknik, L. M. Martinez, J-M Alonso & P. U. Tse (eds.), Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier Science. 155--259.
    Synesthesia is a condition in which stimulation in one modality also gives rise to a perceptual experience in a second modality. In two recent studies we found that the condition is more common than previously reported; up to 5% of the population may experience at least one type of synesthesia. Although the condition has been traditionally viewed as an anomaly (e.g., breakdown in modularity), it seems that at least some of the mechanisms underlying synesthesia do reflect universal cross-modal mechanisms. We (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jamie Ward & Julia Simner (2003). Lexical-Gustatory Synaesthesia: Linguistic and Conceptual Factors. Cognition 89 (3):237-261.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation