Search results for 'Jan Goldman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Lunstroth & Jan Goldman (2007). Ethical Intelligence From Neuroscience: Is It Possible? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):18 – 20.score: 240.0
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  2. Jan Goldman (ed.) (2009). Ethics of Spying: A Reader for the Intelligence Professional. Scarecrow Press.score: 240.0
    Ethics of Spying: A Reader for the Intelligence Professional, Volume 2 seeks to define an intelligence professional while utilizing various theoretical and practical perspectives.
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  3. Gerhard Schurz, Markus Werning & Alvin I. Goldman (eds.) (2009). Reliable Knowledge and Social Epistemology: Essays on the Philosophy of Alvin Goldman and Replies by Goldman. Rodopi.score: 210.0
    The volume contains the written versions of all papers given at the workshop, divided into five chapters and followed by Alvin Goldman¿s replies in the sixth ...
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  4. Harry S. Silverstein & Holly S. Goldman (1976). Goldman's 'Level-2' Act Descriptions and Utilitarian Generalization. Philosophical Studies 30 (1):45 - 55.score: 180.0
  5. A. Goldman (1991). Goldman on Interpreting Art and Literature+ Reply to Stecker. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (3):246-247.score: 180.0
     
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  6. A. Goldman (2006/2008). Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    People are minded creatures; we have thoughts, feelings and emotions. More intriguingly, we grasp our own mental states, and conduct the business of ascribing them to ourselves and others without instruction in formal psychology. How do we do this? And what are the dimensions of our grasp of the mental realm? In this book, Alvin I. Goldman explores these questions with the tools of philosophy, developmental psychology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience. He refines an approach called simulation theory, which (...)
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  7. Alan H. Goldman (2009). Reasons From Within: Desires and Values. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Alan H. Goldman argues for the internalist or subjectivist view of practical reasons on the grounds that it is simpler, more unified, and more comprehensible ...
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  8. Alvin I. Goldman (1999). Knowledge in a Social World. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Knowledge in a Social World offers a philosophy for the information age. Alvin Goldman explores new frontiers by creating a thoroughgoing social epistemology, moving beyond the traditional focus on solitary knowers. Against the tides of postmodernism and social constructionism Goldman defends the integrity of truth and shows how to promote it by well-designed forms of social interaction. From science to education, from law to democracy, he shows why and how public institutions should seek knowledge-enhancing practices. The result is (...)
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  9. Alvin I. Goldman (2002). Pathways to Knowledge: Private and Public. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    How can we know? How can we attain justified belief? These traditional questions in epistemology have inspired philosophers for centuries. Now, in this exceptional work, Alvin Goldman, distinguished scholar and leader in the fields of epistemology and mind, approaches such inquiries as legitimate methods or "pathways" to knowledge. He examines the notion of private and public knowledge, arguing for the epistemic legitimacy of private and introspective methods of gaining knowledge, yet acknowledging the equal importance of social and public mechanisms (...)
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  10. Alan H. Goldman (2001). Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don't. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Rules proliferate; some are kept with a bureaucratic stringency bordering on the absurd, while others are manipulated and ignored in ways that injure our sense of justice. Under what conditions should we make exceptions to rules, and when should they be followed despite particular circumstances? The two dominant models in the current literature on rules are the particularist account and that which sees the application of rules as normative. Taking a position that falls between these two extremes, Alan Goldman (...)
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  11. Alvin I. Goldman (1993). Philosophical Applications of Cognitive Science. Westview Press.score: 60.0
    One of the most fruitful interdisciplinary boundaries in contemporary scholarship is that between philosophy and cognitive science. Now that solid empirical results about the activities of the human mind are available, it is no longer necessary for philosophers to practice armchair psychology.In this short, accessible, and entertaining book, Alvin Goldman presents a masterly survey of recent work in cognitive science that has particular relevance to philosophy. Besides providing a valuable review of the most suggestive work in cognitive and social (...)
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  12. Alvin I. Goldman (2013). Joint Ventures: Mindreading, Mirroring, and Embodied Cognition. Oup Usa.score: 60.0
    This collection of essays by Alvin Goldman explores an array of topics in the philosophy of cognitive science, ranging from embodied cognition to the metaphysics of actions and events.
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  13. Alan H. Goldman (1995). Aesthetic Value. Westview Press.score: 60.0
    At the heart of aesthetics lie fundamental questions about value in art and the objectivity of aesthetic valuation. A theory of aesthetic value must explain how the properties of artworks contribute to the values derived from contemplating and appreciating works of art. When someone passes judgment on a work of art, just what is it that is happening, and how can such judgments be criticized and defended?In this concise survey, intended for advanced undergraduate students of aesthetics, Alan Goldman focuses (...)
     
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  14. Alvin Goldman (1976). Discrimination and Perceptual Knowledge. Journal of Philosophy 73 (November):771-791.score: 30.0
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  15. A. Goldman (1989). Interpretation Psychologized. Mind and Language 4 (3):161-85.score: 30.0
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  16. A. Goldman (1993). The Psychology of Folk Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):15-28.score: 30.0
    The central mission of cognitive science is to reveal the real nature of the mind, however familiar or foreign that nature may be to naive preconceptions. The existence of naive conceptions is also important, however. Prescientific thought and language contain concepts of the mental, and these concepts deserve attention from cognitive science. Just as scientific psychology studies folk physics (McCloskey 1983, Hayes 1985), viz., the common understanding (or misunderstanding) of physical phenomena, so it must study folk psychology, the common understanding (...)
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  17. Alvin Goldman (1993). Consciousness, Folk Psychology, and Cognitive Science. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (4):364-382.score: 30.0
    This paper supports the basic integrity of the folk psychological conception of consciousness and its importance in cognitive theorizing. Section 1 critically examines some proposed definitions of consciousness, and argues that the folk- psychological notion of phenomenal consciousness is not captured by various functional-relational definitions. Section 2 rebuts the arguments of several writers who challenge the very existence of phenomenal consciousness, or the coherence or tenability of the folk-psychological notion of awareness. Section 3 defends a significant role for phenomenal consciousness (...)
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  18. A. Goldman (1992). In Defense of the Simulation Theory. Mind and Language 7 (1-2):104-119.score: 30.0
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  19. A. Goldman (2004). Epistemology and the Evidential Status of Introspective Reports I. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (7-8):1-16.score: 30.0
  20. Alan H. Goldman (1976). Appearing as Irreducible in Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (December):147-164.score: 30.0
  21. Fabien Perrin, Caroline Schnakers, Manuel Schabus, Christian Degueldre, Serge Goldman, Serge Brédart, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville, Maurice Lamy, Gustave Moonen, André Luxen, Pierre Maquet & Steven Laureys (2006). Brain Response to One's Own Name in Vegetative State, Minimally Conscious State, and Locked-in Syndrome. Archives of Neurology 63 (4):562-569.score: 30.0
  22. A. Goldman (1997). Science, Publicity, and Consciousness. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):525-45.score: 30.0
    A traditional view is that scientific evidence can be produced only by intersubjective methods that can be used by different investigators and will produce agreement. This intersubjectivity, or publicity, constraint ostensibly excludes introspection. But contemporary cognitive scientists regularly rely on their subjects' introspective reports in many areas, especially in the study of consciousness. So there is a tension between actual scientific practice and the publicity requirement. Which should give way? This paper argues against the publicity requirement and against a fallback (...)
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  23. A. Goldman (2000). Can Science Know When You're Conscious? Epistemological Foundations of Consciousness Research. Journal Of Consciousness Studies 7:3-22.score: 30.0
  24. Alvin Goldman (1977). Perceptual Objects. Synthese 35 (3):257 - 284.score: 30.0
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  25. Alvin Goldman (1987). Cognitive Science and Metaphysics. Journal of Philosophy 84 (October):537-544.score: 30.0
  26. Alvin Goldman (ed.) (1993). Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: MIT Press.score: 30.0
    This collection of readings shows how cognitive science can influence most of the primary branches of philosophy, as well as how philosophy critically examines...
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  27. A. Goldman (1996). Simulation and Interpersonal Utility. In L. May, Michael Friedman & A. Clark (eds.), Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. MIT Press. 709-726.score: 30.0
  28. Alan H. Goldman (2004). Epistemological Foundations: Can Experiences Justify Beliefs? American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (4):273-285.score: 30.0
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  29. Alan H. Goldman (1975). Criteriological Arguments in Perception. Mind 84 (January):102-105.score: 30.0
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  30. Deborah Giaschi, James E. Jan, Bruce Bjornson, Simon Au Young, Matthew Tata, Christopher J. Lyons, William V. Good & Peter K. H. Wong (2003). Conscious Visual Abilities in a Patient with Early Bilateral Occipital Damage. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology 45 (11):772-781.score: 30.0
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  31. A. Goldman (1969). The Compatibility of Mechanism and Purpose. Philosophical Review 78 (October):468-82.score: 30.0
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  32. Alan H. Goldman (1981). Epistemology and the Psychology of Perception. American Philosophical Quarterly 18 (January):43-51.score: 30.0
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  33. A. Goldman (1968). Actions, Predictions, and Books of Life. American Philosophical Quarterly 5 (July):135-151.score: 30.0
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  34. A. Goldman (1986). Constraints on Representation. In Myles Brand & Robert M. Harnish (eds.), The Representation of Knowledge and Belief. University of Arizona Press. 287--313.score: 30.0
     
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  35. A. Goldman (2000). Folk Psychology and Mental Concepts. Protosociology 14:4-25.score: 30.0
     
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  36. A. Goldman (2002). Simulation Theory and Mental Concepts. In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.score: 30.0
     
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  37. A. Goldman (2002). The Mentalizing Folk. Protosociology 16:7-34.score: 30.0
     
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  38. Paul R. Thagard (1989). Connectionism and Epistemology: Goldman on Winner-Take-All Networks. Philosophia 19 (2-3):189-196.score: 24.0
    This paper examines Alvin Goldman's discussion of acceptance and uncertainty in chapter 15 of his book, Epistemology and Cognition. Goldman discusses how acceptance and rejection of beliefs might be understood in terms of "winner-take-all" connectionist networks. The paper answers some of the questions he raises in his epistemic evaluation of connectionist programs. The major tool for doing this is a connectionist model of explanatory coherence judgments (Thagard, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1989). Finally, there is a discussion of problems (...)
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  39. Christoph Jäger (2009). Why to Believe Weakly in Weak Knowledge: Goldman on Knowledge as Mere True Belief. Grazer Philosophische Studien 79 (1):19-40.score: 24.0
    In a series of influential papers and in his groundbreaking book Knowledge in a Social World Alvin Goldman argues that sometimes “know” just means “believe truly” (Goldman 1999; 2001; 2002b; Goldman & Olsson 2009). I argue that Goldman's (and Olsson's) case for “weak knowledge”, as well as a similar argument put forth by John Hawthorne, are unsuccessful. However, I also believe that Goldman does put his finger on an interesting and important phenomenon. He alerts us (...)
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  40. Uku Tooming (2013). Without Pretense: A Critique of Goldman's Model of Simulation. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-15.score: 24.0
    In this paper I criticize Alvin Goldman's simulation theory of mindreading which involves the claim that the basic method of folk psychologically predicting behaviour is to form pretend beliefs and desires that reproduce the transitions between the mental states of others, in that way enabling to predict what the others are going to do. I argue that when it comes to simulating propositional attitudes it isn't clear whether pretend beliefs need to be invoked in order to explain relevant experimental (...)
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  41. Jérôme Melançon (2013). Jan Patočka's Sacrifice: Philosophy as Dissent. Continental Philosophy Review 46 (4):577-602.score: 24.0
    This article attempts to bring together the life, situation, and philosophical work of the Czech phenomenologist Jan Patočka in order to present his conception of philosophy and sacrifice and to understand his action of dissent and his own sacrifice as spokesman for Charter 77 in light of these concepts. Patočka philosophized despite being barred from teaching under the German occupation and under the communist regime, even after he was forced to retire and banned from publication. He also refused the official (...)
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  42. Jack C. Lyons (forthcoming). Goldman on Evidence and Reliability. In H. Kornblith & B. McLaughlin (eds.), Goldman and His Critics. Blackwell.score: 21.0
    Goldman, though still a reliabilist, has made some recent concessions to evidentialist epistemologies. I agree that reliabilism is most plausible when it incorporates certain evidentialist elements, but I try to minimize the evidentialist component. I argue that fewer beliefs require evidence than Goldman thinks, that Goldman should construe evidential fit in process reliabilist terms, rather than the way he does, and that this process reliabilist understanding of evidence illuminates such important epistemological concepts as propositional justification, ex ante (...)
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  43. William Child (2002). Reply to Alvin I. Goldman. In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. Amsterdam: J Benjamins. 45--21.score: 21.0
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  44. Jan Zygmunt (1981). The Logical Investigations of Jan Kalicki. History and Philosophy of Logic 2 (1-2):41-53.score: 21.0
    This paper describes the work of the Polish logician Jan Kalicki (1922?1953). After a biographical introduction, his work on logical matrices and equational logic is appraised. A bibliography of his papers and reviews is also included.
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  45. Leslie A. Howe (2000). On Goldman. Wadsworth.score: 21.0
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  46. Albert Newen & Tobias Schlicht (2009). Understanding Other Minds: A Criticism of Goldman's Simulation Theory and an Outline of the Person Model Theory. Grazer Philosophische Studien 79 (1):209-242.score: 18.0
    What exactly do we do when we try to make sense of other people e.g. by ascribing mental states like beliefs and desires to them? After a short criticism of Theory-Theory, Interaction Theory and the Narrative Theory of understanding others as well as an extended criticism of the Simulation Theory in Goldman's recent version (2006), we suggest an alternative approach: the Person Model Theory . Person models are the basis for our ability to register and evaluate persons having mental (...)
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  47. Oliver R. Scholz (2009). Experts: What They Are and How We Recognize Them—a Discussion of Alvin Goldman's Views. Grazer Philosophische Studien 79 (1):187-205.score: 18.0
    What are experts? Are there only experts in a subjective sense or are there also experts in an objective sense? And how, if at all, may non-experts recognize experts in an objective sense? In this paper, I approach these important questions by discussing Alvin I. Goldman's thoughts about how to define objective epistemic authority and about how non-experts are able to identify experts. I argue that a multiple epistemic desiderata approach is superior to Goldman's purely veritistic approach.
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  48. Pierre Le Morvan (2005). Goldman on Knowledge as True Belief. Erkenntnis 62 (2):145-155.score: 18.0
    Alvin Goldman contends that, in addition to the familiar sense or use of the term “knowledge” according to which knowledge is at least true justified belief, there is a weaker yet strict sense or use of the term “knowledge” according to which knowledge amounts to nothing more than information-possession or mere true belief. In this paper, I argue that Goldman has failed to show that there is such a weaker sense, and that, even if he had shown this, (...)
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  49. Josef Perner & Johannes L. Brandl (2009). Simulation à la Goldman: Pretend and Collapse. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 144 (3):435 - 446.score: 18.0
    Theories of mind draw on processes that represent mental states and their computational connections; simulation, in addition, draws on processes that replicate (Heal 1986 ) a sequence of mental states. Moreover, mental simulation can be triggered by input from imagination instead of real perceptions. To avoid confusion between mental states concerning reality and those created in simulation, imagined contents must be quarantined. Goldman bypasses this problem by giving pretend states a special role to play in simulation (Goldman 2006 (...)
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  50. Selim Berker (forthcoming). Reply to Goldman: Cutting Up the One to Save the Five in Epistemology. Episteme.score: 18.0
    I argue that Alvin Goldman has failed to save process reliabilism from my critique in earlier work of consequentialist or teleological epistemic theories. First, Goldman misconstrues the nature of my challenge: two of the cases he discusses I never claimed to be counterexamples to process reliabilism. Second, Goldman’s reply to the type of case I actually claimed to be a counterexample to process reliabilism is unsuccessful. He proposes a variety of responses, but all of them either feature (...)
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