Search results for 'Jane Adamson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  14
    Jane Adamson, Richard Freadman & David Parker (eds.) (1998). Renegotiating Ethics in Literature, Philosophy, and Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Is it possible for postmodernism to offer viable, coherent accounts of ethics? Or are our social and intellectual worlds too fragmented for any broad consensus about the moral life? These issues have emerged as some of the most contentious in literary and philosophical studies. In Renegotiating Ethics in Literature, Philosophy, and Theory a distinguished international gathering of philosophers and literary scholars address the reconceptualisations involved in this 'turn towards ethics'. An important feature of this has been a renewed interest in (...)
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  2. Jane Adamson (1989). Hardy and Idiosyncrasy.'. The Critical Review 29:3-24.
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  3.  3
    Melitta Weiss Adamson (2010). Hildegard Elisabeth Keller, ed., Jakob Ruf: Leben, Werk und Studien, 1: Mit der Arbeit seiner Hände: Leben und Werk des Zürcher Stadtchirurgen und Theatermachers Jakob Ruf , with Linus Hunkeler, Andrea Kauer, and Stefan Schöbi, 2nd ed.; 2: Jakob Ruf, Werke bis 1544: Kritische Gesamtausgabe, part 1; 3: Jakob Ruf, Werke 1545–1549: Kritische Gesamtausgabe, part 2; 4: Jakob Ruf, Werke 1550–1558: Kritische Gesamtausgabe, part 3; 5: Die Anfänge der Menschwerdung: Perspektiven zur Medien-, Medizin- und Theatergeschichte des 16. Jahrhunderts. Zurich: Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 2008. 1: pp. 320 plus CD in back cover pocket; color figures and 108 black-and-white figures. 2: pp. 780. 3: pp. 708. 4: pp. 1020. 5: pp. 724 plus CD in back cover pocket; many black-and-white facsimiles. First ed. of vol. 1 published in 2006 by Chronos, Zurich, and reviewed in Speculum 83 , 206–7, by Melitta Weiss Adamson. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (3):694-696.
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  4. Guppy & Mary Jane (1863). Mary Jane; or, Spiritualism Chemically Explained [by - Guppy].
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  5. William Stanley Jevons & Robert Adamson (1890). Pure Logic, and Other Minor Works, Ed. By R. Adamson and H.A. Jevons.
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  6.  2
    Roger Ariew, John Cottingham, Tom Sorrell, Richard J. Blackwell, Robert de Lucca, David Boucher, Bruce Haddock, Warren Breckman, Elena Castellani & Jules L. Coleman (1999). Appearance in This List Neither Guarantees nor Precludes a Future Review of the Book. Adamson, Jane, Freadman, Richard and Parker, David (Eds.), Renegotiating Ethics in Literature, Philosophy, and Theory, Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press, 1999, Pp. 294,£ 35.00,£ 12.95. Annas, Julia, Platonic Ethics Old and New, Ithaca, New York, USA, Cornell Univer. [REVIEW] Mind 108:430.
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  7.  14
    Peter Adamson (2007). Al-Kindī. Oxford University Press.
    Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. He lived in Iraq and studied in Baghdad, where he became attached to the caliphal court. In due course he would become an important figure at court: a tutor to the caliph's son, and a central figure in the translation movement of the ninth century, which rendered much of Greek philosophy, science, and medicine into Arabic. Al-Kindi's wide-ranging intellectual interests included not only philosophy but also music, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. Through (...)
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  8.  17
    Peter Adamson, Al-Kindi. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. He lived in Iraq and studied in Baghdad, where he became attached to the caliphal court. In due course he would become an important figure at court: a tutor to the caliph's son, and a central figure in the translation movement of the ninth century, which rendered much of Greek philosophy, science, and medicine into Arabic. Al-Kindi's wide-ranging intellectual interests included not only philosophy but also music, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. Through (...)
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  9.  10
    Peter Adamson (2006). Al-Kind=I. OUP Usa.
    The first book in the Great Medieval Thinkers series to focus on an Islamic philosopher. It offers a brief, accessible introduction to the thought of the philosopher al -Kindi . His works, though brief, are of great historical importance. Al-Kindi was the first philosopher of the Islamic world. Peter Adamson will survey what is known of al-Kindi's life, examine his thought on a wide range of topics, and consider the relationship of al-Kindi's work to his Greek sources.
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  10. Peter Adamson (2016). Classical Philosophy: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, Volume 1. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Classical Philosophy is the first of a series of books in which Peter Adamson aims ultimately to present a complete history of philosophy, more thoroughly but also more enjoyably than ever before. In short, lively chapters, based on the popular History of Philosophy podcast, he offers an accessible, humorous, and detailed look at the emergence of philosophy with the Presocratics, the probing questions of Socrates, and the first full flowering of philosophy with the dialogues of Plato and the treatises (...)
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  11.  12
    Peter Adamson (2014). Classical Philosophy: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, Volume 1. OUP Oxford.
    In 43 lively chapters Peter Adamson tells the story of philosophy from its beginnings to Plato and Aristotle. Most histories jump from one famous name to another, but Adamson shows that the people and ideas in between, usually overlooked, are fascinating and significant. Based on his popular podcasts, this is serious history with a light touch.
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  12.  26
    Robert Adamson (1854/1993). On the Philosophy of Kant. Routledge/Thoemmes Press.
    There has recently been a considerable amount of research into the influence of 18th century British philosophy--particularly into the thinking of David Hume on Continental philosophy and Kant. The aim of this collection is to provide some of the key texts which illustrate the impact of Kant's thought together with two important 20th century monographs on aspects of Kant's early reception and his influence on philosophical thought. Contents: Immanuel Kant in England 1793-1838 [1931] Rene Wellek 328 pp The Early Reception (...)
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  13. Peter Adamson (2015). Philosophy in the Hellenistic and Roman Worlds: A History of Philosophy Wthout Any Gaps, Volume 2. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Peter Adamson offers an accessible, humorous tour through a period of eight hundred years when some of the most influential of all schools of thought were formed. He introduces us to Cynics and Skeptics, Epicureans and Stoics, emperors and slaves, and traces the development of early Christian philosophy and of ancient science. A major theme of the book is in fact the competition between pagan and Christian philosophy in this period, and the Jewish tradition appears in the shape of (...)
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  14. Peter Adamson (2015). Philosophy in the Islamic World: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press Uk.
    In the history of philosophy, few topics are so relevant to today's cultural and political landscape as philosophy in the Islamic world. Yet, this remains one of the lesser-known philosophical traditions. In this Very Short Introduction, Peter Adamson explores the history of philosophy among Muslims, Jews, and Christians living in Islamic lands, from its historical background to thinkers in the twentieth century.Introducing the main philosophical themes of the Islamic world, Adamson integrates ideas from the Islamic and Abrahamic faiths (...)
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  15. Peter Adamson (2016). Philosophy in the Islamic World: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps, Volume 3. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Peter Adamson presents the first full history of philosophy in the Islamic world for a broad readership. He traces its development from early Islam to the 20th century, ranging from Spain to South Asia, featuring Jewish and Christian thinkers as well as Muslim. Major figures like Avicenna, Averroes, and Maimonides are covered in great detail, but the book also looks at less familiar thinkers, including women philosophers. Attention is also given to the philosophical relevance of Islamic theology and mysticism--the (...)
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  16. John William Adamson (ed.) (2011). The Educational Writings of John Locke. Cambridge University Press.
    John Locke is widely regarded as one of the most influential of the Enlightenment philosophers. This volume, edited by J. W. Adamson and published as a second edition in 1922, contains two of John Locke's essays concerning education; Some Thoughts Concerning Education and Of the Conduct of the Understanding. Some Thoughts Concerning Education expands on Locke's pioneering theory of mind by explaining how to educate a child using three complementary methods: the development of a healthy body; the formation of (...)
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  17.  56
    R. Adamson, S. F., James Seth & H. Barker (1898). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 7 (25):112-127.
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  18.  74
    Ignacio Jané (2006). What is Tarski's Common Concept of Consequence? Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (1):1-42.
    In 1936 Tarski sketched a rigorous definition of the concept of logical consequence which, he claimed, agreed quite well with common usage-or, as he also said, with the common concept of consequence. Commentators of Tarski's paper have usually been elusive as to what this common concept is. However, being clear on this issue is important to decide whether Tarski's definition failed (as Etchemendy has contended) or succeeded (as most commentators maintain). I argue that the common concept of consequence that Tarski (...)
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  19.  43
    Ignasi Jané (2010). Idealist and Realist Elements in Cantor's Approach to Set Theory. Philosophia Mathematica 18 (2):193-226.
    There is an apparent tension between the open-ended aspect of the ordinal sequence and the assumption that the set-theoretical universe is fully determinate. This tension is already present in Cantor, who stressed the incompletable character of the transfinite number sequence in Grundlagen and avowed the definiteness of the totality of sets and numbers in subsequent philosophical publications and in correspondence. The tension is particularly discernible in his late distinction between sets and inconsistent multiplicities. I discuss Cantor’s contrasting views, and I (...)
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  20.  23
    I. Jane (2010). Idealist and Realist Elements in Cantor's Approach to Set Theory. Philosophia Mathematica 18 (2):193-226.
    There is an apparent tension between the open-ended aspect of the ordinal sequence and the assumption that the set-theoretical universe is fully determinate. This tension is already present in Cantor, who stressed the incompletable character of the transfinite number sequence in Grundlagen and avowed the definiteness of the totality of sets and numbers in subsequent philosophical publications and in correspondence. The tension is particularly discernible in his late distinction between sets and inconsistent multiplicities. I discuss Cantor’s contrasting views, and I (...)
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  21.  59
    Ignacio Jané & Gabriel Uzquiano (2004). Well- and Non-Well-Founded Fregean Extensions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (5):437-465.
    George Boolos has described an interpretation of a fragment of ZFC in a consistent second-order theory whose only axiom is a modification of Frege's inconsistent Axiom V. We build on Boolos's interpretation and study the models of a variety of such theories obtained by amending Axiom V in the spirit of a limitation of size principle. After providing a complete structural description of all well-founded models, we turn to the non-well-founded ones. We show how to build models in which foundation (...)
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  22.  61
    Ignacio Jané (1993). A Critical Appraisal of Second-Order Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 14 (1):67-86.
    Because of its capacity to characterize mathematical concepts and structures?a capacity which first-order languages clearly lack?second-order languages recommend themselves as a convenient framework for much of mathematics, including set theory. This paper is about the credentials of second-order logic:the reasons for it to be considered logic, its relations with set theory, and especially the efficacy with which it performs its role of the underlying logic of set theory.
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  23. Peter Adamson (2003). Review: Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (446):363-366.
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  24. Peter Adamson (2003). Al-Kindi and the Mu‘Tazila: Divine Attributes, Creation and Freedom. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (1):45-77.
    The paper discusses al-Kindi's response to doctrines held by contemporary theologians of the Mu‘tazilite school: divine attributes, creation, and freedom. In the first section it is argued that, despite his broadly negative theology, al-Kindi recognizes a special kind of “essential” positive attribute belonging to God. The second section argues that al-Kindi agreed with the Mu‘tazila in holding that something may not yet exist but still be an object of God's knowledge and power (as the Mu‘tazila put it, that “non-being” is (...)
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  25.  96
    Peter Adamson (2002). Before Essence and Existence: Al-Kindi's Conception of Being. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):297-312.
    This paper studies the first metaphysical theory in Arabic philosophy, that of al-Kindi, as found in "On First Philosophy" and other of his works. Placing these works against the background of translations produced in al-Kindi's circle (the "Theology of Aristotle," which is the Arabic version of Plotinus, and the "Liber de Causis," the Arabic version of Proclus' "Elements of Theology"), it argues that al-Kindi has two conceptions of being: "simple" being, which excludes predication and derives from Neoplatonism, and "complex" being, (...)
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  26.  76
    Ignagio Jane (2001). Reflections on Skolem's Relativity of Set-Theoretical Concepts. Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):129-153.
    In this paper an attempt is made to present Skolem's argument, for the relativity of some set-theoretical notions as a sensible one. Skolem's critique of set theory is seen as part of a larger argument to the effect that no conclusive evidence has been given for the existence of uncountable sets. Some replies to Skolem are discussed and are shown not to affect Skolem's position, since they all presuppose the existence of uncountable sets. The paper ends with an assessment of (...)
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  27.  68
    Ignacio Jané (1995). The Role of the Absolute Infinite in Cantor's Conception of Set. Erkenntnis 42 (3):375 - 402.
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  28.  43
    Peter Adamson (2006). Vision, Light and Color in Al-Kindi, Ptolemy and the Ancient Commentators. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):207-236.
    Al-Kindi was influenced by two Greek traditions in his attempts to explain vision, light and color. Most obviously, his works on optics are indebted to Euclid and, perhaps indirectly, to Ptolemy. But he also knew some works from the Aristotelian tradition that touch on the nature of color and vision. Al-Kindi explicitly rejects the Aristotelian account of vision in his De Aspectibus, and adopts a theory according to which we see by means of a visual ray emitted from the eye. (...)
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  29.  36
    Ignacio Jane (1997). Theoremhood and Logical Consequence. Theoria 12 (1):139-160.
    In this paper, Tarskis notion of Logical Consequence is viewed as a special case of the more general notion of being a theorem of an axiomatic theory. As was recognized by Tarski, the material adequacy of his definition depends on having the distinction between logical and non logical constants right, but we find Tarskis analysis persuasive even if we dont agree on what constants are logical. This accords with the view put forward in this paper that Tarski indeed captures the (...)
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  30.  43
    Ignacio Jané (2003). Remarks on Second-Order Consequence. Theoria 18 (2):179-187.
    Tarski’s definition of logical consequence can take different forms when implemented in second order languages, depending on what counts as a model. In the canonical, or standard, version, a model is just an ordinary structure and the (monadic) second-order variables are meant to range over all subsets of its domain. We discuss the dependence of canonical second-order consequence on set theory and raise doubts on the assumption that canonical consequence is a definite relation.
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  31.  65
    Peter Adamson (2006). The Arabic Sea Battle: Al-Fārābī on the Problem of Future Contingents. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 88 (2):163-188.
    Ancient commentators like Ammonius and Boethius tried to solve Aristotle's “sea battle argument” in On Interpretation 9 by saying that statements about future contingents are “indefinitely” true or false. They were followed by al-Fārābī in his commentary on On Interpretation. The article sets out two possible interpretations of what “indefinitely” means here, and shows that al-Fārābī actually has both conceptions: one applied in his interpretation of Aristotle, and another that he is forced into by the problem of divine foreknowledge. It (...)
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  32.  72
    Ignacio Jané (2005). Review of C. Badesa, The Birth of Model Theory: Löwenheim's Theorem in the Frame of the Theory of Relatives. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 13 (1):91-106.
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  33.  36
    Peter Adamson & Richard C. Taylor (eds.) (2005). The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy written in Arabic and in the Islamic world represents one of the great traditions of Western philosophy. Inspired by Greek philosophical works and the indigenous ideas of Islamic theology, Arabic philosophers from the ninth century onwards put forward ideas of great philosophical and historical importance. This collection of essays, by some of the leading scholars in Arabic philosophy, provides an introduction to the field by way of chapters devoted to individual thinkers (such as al-Farabi, Avicenna and Averroes) or groups, (...)
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  34.  75
    Peter Adamson, The Theology of Aristotle. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  35.  51
    Peter Adamson (2001). Aristotelianism and the Soul in the Arabic Plotinus. Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (2):211-232.
  36.  49
    R. Adamson (1889). Riehl on "Philosophical Criticism". Mind 14 (53):66-96.
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  37.  67
    Walter L. Adamson (1983). Andrew Feenberg, Lukács, Marx and the Sources of Critical Theory (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (2):264.
  38. Peter Adamson (2002). The Arabic Plotinus: A Philosophical Study of the Theology of Aristotle. Duckworth.
  39.  55
    Peter Adamson (2005). On Knowledge of Particulars. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (3):273–294.
    Avicenna's notorious claim that God knows particulars only 'in a universal way' is argued to have its roots in Aristotelian epistemology, and especially in the "Posterior Analytics". According to Avicenna and Aristotle as understood by Avicenna, there is in fact no such thing as 'knowledge' of particulars, at least not as such. Rather, a particular can only be known by subsuming it under a universal. Thus Avicenna turns out to be committed to a much more surprising epistemological thesis: even humans (...)
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  40.  44
    Peter Adamson (2012). Neoplatonism. [REVIEW] Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 57 (4):380-399.
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  41.  47
    R. Adamson (1883). Mr. H. Sidgwick on the Critical Philosophy. Mind 8 (30):251-255.
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  42.  17
    Alan Adamson & Robin Giles (1979). A Game-Based Formal System for Ł∞. Studia Logica 38 (1):49-73.
    A formal system for , based on a game-theoretic analysis of the ukasiewicz prepositional connectives, is defined and proved to be complete. An Herbrand theorem for the predicate calculus (a variant of some work of Mostowski) and some corollaries relating to its axiomatizability are proved. The predicate calculus with equality is also considered.
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  43.  44
    Peter Adamson (2008). Plotinus' Cosmology. A Study of Ennead II.1 (40). Text, Translation and Commentary. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2):219-223.
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  44.  29
    Peter Adamson (2012). Neoplatonism. [REVIEW] Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 57 (4):380-399.
  45.  19
    Ignacio Jané (1988). Lógica Y Ontología. Theoria 4 (1):81-106.
    In this paper we discuss the way logical consequence depends on what sets there are. We try to find out what set-theoretical assumptions have to be made to determine a logic, i.e., to give a definite answer to whether any given argument is correct. Consideration of second order logic -which is left highly indetermined by the usual set-theoretical axioms- prompts us to suggest a slightly different but natural nation of logical consequence, which reduces second order logic indeterminacy without interfering with (...)
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  46.  22
    Peter Adamson & Peter E. Pormann (2009). Aristotle's Categories and the Soul : An Annotated Translation of Al-Kindī's That There Are Separate Substances. In Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth & John M. Dillon (eds.), The Afterlife of the Platonic Soul: Reflections of Platonic Psychology in the Monotheistic Religions. Brill
  47.  22
    Robert Adamson (1883). Kant's View of Mathematical Premisses and Reasonings. Mind 8 (31):421 - 425.
  48.  21
    Tim Adamson (2005). Measure for Measure: The Reliance of Human Knowledge on the Things of the World. Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):175-194.
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  49.  20
    S. Chow Wing, P. Wu Jane & K. K. Chan Allan (2009). The Effects of Environmental Factors on the Behavior of Chinese Managers in the Information Age in China. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4).
    This paper examines the effects of environmental factors on the ethical behavior of managers using computers at work in Mainland China. In this study, environmental factors refer to senior management, peer groups, company policies, professional practices, and legal considerations. Ethical behaviors include attitudes to disclosure, protection of privacy, conflict of interest, personal conduct, social responsibility, and integrity. A questionnaire survey was used for data collection, and 125 mainland Chinese managers participated in the study. The results show that peer groups, professional (...)
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  50.  20
    Robert Adamson (1876). Schopenhauer's Philosophy. Mind 1 (4):491-509.
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