Search results for 'Jane Barrett' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  85
    Jane Barrett (2006). Ethics in Clinical Research. Icr Pub..
    Chapter One: Introduction “The ethical basis of all [medical] research is that information gained from one patient's experience should, where feasible, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. William Barrett, Bryan Magee & British Broadcasting Corporation (1977). Heidegger and Modern Existentialism Bryan Magee Talked to William Barrett. British Broadcasting Corporation.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Guppy & Mary Jane (1863). Mary Jane; or, Spiritualism Chemically Explained [by - Guppy].
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Louise Barrett (2011). Beyond the Brain: How Body and Environment Shape Animal and Human Minds. Princeton University Press.
    When a chimpanzee stockpiles rocks as weapons or when a frog sends out mating calls, we might easily assume these animals know their own motivations--that they use the same psychological mechanisms that we do. But as Beyond the Brain indicates, this is a dangerous assumption because animals have different evolutionary trajectories, ecological niches, and physical attributes. How do these differences influence animal thinking and behavior? Removing our human-centered spectacles, Louise Barrett investigates the mind and brain and offers an alternative (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  5.  16
    Jeffrey Alan Barrett (1999). The Quantum Mechanics of Minds and Worlds. Oxford University Press.
    Jeffrey Barrett presents the most comprehensive study yet of a problem that has puzzled physicists and philosophers since the 1930s.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   29 citations  
  6. Justin L. Barrett & Ian M. Church (2013). Should CSR Give Atheists Epistemic Assurance? On Beer-Goggles, BFFs, and Skepticism Regarding Religious Beliefs. The Monist 96 (3):311-324.
    Recent work in cognitive science of religion (CSR) is beginning to converge on a very interesting thesis—that, given the ordinary features of human minds operating in typical human environments, we are naturally disposed to believe in the existence of gods, among other religious ideas (e.g., seeAtran [2002], Barrett [2004; 2012], Bering [2011], Boyer [2001], Guthrie [1993], McCauley [2011], Pyysiäinen [2004; 2009]). In this paper, we explore whether such a discovery ultimately helps or hurts the atheist position—whether, for example, it (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. William Barrett (1990). Irrational Man: A Study in Existential Philosophy. Anchor Books, Doubleday.
    Widely recognized as the finest definition of existentialist Philosophy, this book introduced existentialism to America in 1958. Barrett discusses the views of 19th and 20th century existentialists Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre and interprets the impact of their thinking on literature, art, and philosophy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  8.  22
    Jeffrey A. Barrett (forthcoming). The Evolution, Appropriation, and Composition of Rules. Synthese:1-14.
    This paper concerns how rule-following behavior might evolve in the context of a variety of Skyrms–Lewis signaling game (Lewis, Convention, 1969; Skyrms, Signals evolution, learning, & information 2010), how such rules might subsequently evolve to be used in new contexts, and how such appropriation allows for the composition of evolved rules. We will also consider how the composition of simpler rules to form more complex rules may be significantly more efficient than evolving the complex rules directly. And we will review (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  30
    Nathaniel Barrett (2011). Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott (Eds): Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (6):659-668.
    Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott (eds): Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9258-2 Authors Nathaniel Barrett, Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion 1711 Massachusetts Ave NW #308 Washington DC 20036 USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  5
    Pamela Barrett (2012). Democracy and Equality. The Australian Humanist 108 (108):15.
    Barrett, Pamela Believers or atheists, generous or tight, Hero or coward, black, yellow or white, Female or male, fully grown or a child, Those of vast wealth or the desperately poor, At the end we're all equal. We are all shown the door..
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Pamela Barrett (2013). Written on My Behalf. The Australian Humanist 110 (110):6.
    Barrett, Pamela My name is Lucky and I am, because I'm a dog..
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  3
    Helen Marjorie Barrett (1940). Boethius: Some Aspects of His Times and Work. New York, Russell & Russell.
    Originally published in 1940, this book contains a succinct introduction to Boethius, the influential medieval philosopher who was writing during the final days of the Western Roman Empire. Barrett keeps the general reader in mind as she explains Boethius' philosophy and his role in keeping Greek thinking available to his fellow Romans even as they were being conquered by the Ostrogoths. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in ancient thought and in Late Antique philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Clark H. Barrett & Robert Kurzban (2006). Modularity in Cognition: Framing the Debate. Psychological Review 113 (3):628-647.
    Modularity has been the subject of intense debate in the cognitive sciences for more than 2 decades. In some cases, misunderstandings have impeded conceptual progress. Here the authors identify arguments about modularity that either have been abandoned or were never held by proponents of modular views of the mind. The authors review arguments that purport to undermine modularity, with particular attention on cognitive architecture, development, genetics, and evolution. The authors propose that modularity, cleanly defined, provides a useful framework for directing (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   40 citations  
  14.  56
    Robert J. Williams & J. Douglas Barrett (2000). Corporate Philanthropy, Criminal Activity, and Firm Reputation: Is There a Link? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 26 (4):341 - 350.
    This study examined the influence of corporate giving programs on the link between certain categories of corporate crime and corporate reputation. Specifically, firms that violate EPA and OSHA regulations should, to some extent, experience a decline in their reputations, while firms that contribute to charitable causes should see their reputations enhanced. The results of this study support both of these contentions. Further, the results suggest that corporate giving significantly moderates the link between the number of EPA and OSHA violations committed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   38 citations  
  15.  30
    Jeffrey A. Barrett (2007). Dynamic Partitioning and the Conventionality of Kinds. Philosophy of Science 74 (4):527-546.
    Lewis sender‐receiver games illustrate how a meaningful term language might evolve from initially meaningless random signals (Lewis 1969; Skyrms 2006). Here we consider how a meaningful language with a primitive grammar might evolve in a somewhat more subtle sort of game. The evolution of such a language involves the co‐evolution of partitions of the physical world into what may seem, at least from the perspective of someone using the language, to correspond to canonical natural kinds. While the evolved language may (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  16.  64
    H. Clark Barrett (2005). Enzymatic Computation and Cognitive Modularity. Mind and Language 20 (3):259-87.
    Currently, there is widespread skepticism that higher cognitive processes, given their apparent flexibility and globality, could be carried out by specialized computational devices, or modules. This skepticism is largely due to Fodor’s influential definition of modularity. From the rather flexible catalogue of possible modular features that Fodor originally proposed has emerged a widely held notion of modules as rigid, informationally encapsulated devices that accept highly local inputs and whose opera- tions are insensitive to context. It is a mistake, however, to (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  17.  40
    Clark H. Barrett (2005). Enzymatic Computation and Cognitive Modularity. Mind and Language 20 (3):259-287.
    Currently, there is widespread skepticism that higher cognitive processes, given their apparent flexibility and globality, could be carried out by specialized computational devices, or modules. This skepticism is largely due to Fodor’s influential definition of modularity. From the rather flexible catalogue of possible modular features that Fodor originally proposed has emerged a widely held notion of modules as rigid, informationally encapsulated devices that accept highly local inputs and whose opera- tions are insensitive to context. It is a mistake, however, to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  18.  46
    Edouard Machery & H. Clark Barrett (2006). Debunking Adapting Minds. Philosophy of Science 73 (2):232-246.
    David Buller’s recent book, _Adapting Minds_, is a philosophical critique of the field of evolutionary psychology. Buller argues that evolutionary psychology is utterly bankrupt from both a theoretical and an empirical point of view. Although _Adapting Minds _has been well received in both the academic press and the popular media, we argue that Buller’s critique of evolutionary psychology fails.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  19.  87
    Jeffrey Barrett, Everett's Relative-State Formulation of Quantum Mechanics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Everett's relative-state formulation of quantum mechanics is an attempt to solve the measurement problem by dropping the collapse dynamics from the standard von Neumann-Dirac theory of quantum mechanics. The main problem with Everett's theory is that it is not at all clear how it is supposed to work. In particular, while it is clear that he wanted to explain why we get determinate measurement results in the context of his theory, it is unclear how he intended to do this. There (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  20. Jeffrey A. Barrett (1995). The Single-Mind and Many-Minds Versions of Quantum Mechanics. Erkenntnis 42 (1):89-105.
    There is a long tradition of trying to find a satisfactory interpretation of Everett's relative-state formulation of quantum mechanics. Albert and Loewer recently described two new ways of reading Everett: one we will call the single-mind theory and the other the many-minds theory. I will briefly describe these theories and present some of their merits and problems. Since both are no-collapse theories, a significant merit is that they can take advantage of certain properties of the linear dynamics, which Everett apparently (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  21. Jeffrey A. Barrett (2003). Are Our Best Physical Theories (Probably and/or Approximately) True? Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1206-1218.
    There is good reason to suppose that our best physical theories are false: In addition to its own internal problems, the standard formulation of quantum mechanics is logically incompatible with special relativity. I will also argue that we have no concrete idea what it means to claim that these theories are approximately true.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  22.  33
    Robert W. Armstrong, Robert J. Williams & J. Douglas Barrett (2004). The Impact of Banality, Risky Shift and Escalating Commitment on Ethical Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (4):365-370.
    This paper posits that organizational variables are the factors that lead to the moral decline of companies like Enron and Worldcom. The individuals involved created environments within the organizations that precipitated a spiral of unethical decision-making. It is proposed that at the executive level, it is the organizational factors associated with power and decision-making that have the critical influence on moral and ethical behavior. The study has used variables that were deemed to be surrogate measures of the ethical violations (OSHA (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  23.  76
    Ignacio Jané (2006). What is Tarski's Common Concept of Consequence? Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (1):1-42.
    In 1936 Tarski sketched a rigorous definition of the concept of logical consequence which, he claimed, agreed quite well with common usage-or, as he also said, with the common concept of consequence. Commentators of Tarski's paper have usually been elusive as to what this common concept is. However, being clear on this issue is important to decide whether Tarski's definition failed (as Etchemendy has contended) or succeeded (as most commentators maintain). I argue that the common concept of consequence that Tarski (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  24.  57
    Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.) (2005). Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press.
    Presenting state-of-the-art work on the conscious and unconscious processes involved in emotion, this integrative volume brings together leading psychologists, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  25. Martin Barrett & Elliott Sober (1994). The Second Law of Probability Dynamics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (4):941-953.
    When the probability of causes, and the probability of effects, given causes, are each randomly assigned, entropy ‘usually’ increases.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26.  38
    Jeffrey Alan Barrett (2008). Approximate Truth and Descriptive Nesting. Erkenntnis 68 (2):213 - 224.
    There is good reason to suppose that our best physical theories, quantum mechanics and special relativity, are false if taken together and literally. If they are in fact false, then how should they count as providing knowledge of the physical world? One might imagine that, while strictly false, our best physical theories are nevertheless in some sense probably approximately true. This paper presents a notion of local probable approximate truth in terms of descriptive nesting relations between current and subsequent theories. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  27. Jeffrey A. Barrett (2005). Relativistic Quantum Mechanics Through Frame-Dependent Constructions. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):802-813.
    This paper is concerned with the possibility and nature of relativistic hidden-variable formulations of quantum mechanics. Both ad hoc teleological constructions of spacetime maps and frame-dependent constructions of spacetime maps are considered. While frame-dependent constructions are clearly preferable, they provide neither mechanical nor causal explanations for local quantum events. Rather, the hiddenvariable dynamics used in such constructions is just a rule that helps to characterize the set of all possible spacetime maps. But while having neither mechanical nor causal explanations of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  28. David Z. Albert & Jeffrey A. Barrett (1995). On What It Takes to Be a World. Topoi 14 (1):35-37.
    A many-worlds interpretation is of quantum mechanics tells us that the linear equations of motion are the true and complete laws for the time-evolution of every physical system and that the usual quantum-mechanical states provide complete descriptions of all possible physical situations. Such an interpretation, however, denies the standard way of understanding quantum-mechanical states. When the pointer on a measuring device is in a superposition of pointing many different directions, for example, we are to understand this as many pointers, each (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  29. Jeffrey A. Barrett (2005). The Preferred-Basis Problem and the Quantum Mechanics of Everything. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (2):199-220.
    argued that there are two options for what he called a realistic solution to the quantum measurement problem: (1) select a preferred set of observables for which definite values are assumed to exist, or (2) attempt to assign definite values to all observables simultaneously (1810–1). While conventional wisdom has it that the second option is ruled out by the Kochen-Specker theorem, Vink nevertheless advocated it. Making every physical quantity determinate in quantum mechanics carries with it significant conceptual costs, but it (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  30. Jeffrey A. Barrett (2006). A Quantum-Mechanical Argument for Mind–Body Dualism. Erkenntnis 65 (1):97 - 115.
    I argue that a strong mind–body dualism is required of any formulation of quantum mechanics that satisfies a relatively weak set of explanatory constraints. Dropping one or more of these constraints may allow one to avoid the commitment to a mind–body dualism but may also require a commitment to a physical–physical dualism that is at least as objectionable. Ultimately, it is the preferred basis problem that pushes both collapse and no-collapse theories in the direction of a strong dualism in resolving (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31.  99
    H. Clark Barrett (2001). On the Functional Origins of Essentialism. [Journal (Paginated)] (in Press) 2 (1):1-30.
    This essay examines the proposal that psychological essentialism results from a history of natural selection acting on human representation and inference systems. It has been argued that the features that distinguish essentialist representational systems are especially well suited for representing natural kinds. If the evolved function of essentialism is to exploit the rich inductive potential of such kinds, then it must be subserved by cognitive mechanisms that carry out at least three distinct functions: identifying these kinds in the environment, constructing (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  32.  42
    Jeffrey A. Barrett (1996). Empirical Adequacy and the Availability of Reliable Records in Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 63 (1):49-64.
    In order to judge whether a theory is empirically adequate one must have epistemic access to reliable records of past measurement results that can be compared against the predictions of the theory. Some formulations of quantum mechanics fail to satisfy this condition. The standard theory without the collapse postulate is an example. Bell's reading of Everett's relative-state formulation is another. Furthermore, there are formulations of quantum mechanics that only satisfy this condition for a special class of observers, formulations whose empirical (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  33. Jeffrey A. Barrett (2001). The Strange World of Quantum Mechanics Daniel F. Styer. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):393-396.
  34.  61
    Ignacio Jané & Gabriel Uzquiano (2004). Well- and Non-Well-Founded Fregean Extensions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (5):437-465.
    George Boolos has described an interpretation of a fragment of ZFC in a consistent second-order theory whose only axiom is a modification of Frege's inconsistent Axiom V. We build on Boolos's interpretation and study the models of a variety of such theories obtained by amending Axiom V in the spirit of a limitation of size principle. After providing a complete structural description of all well-founded models, we turn to the non-well-founded ones. We show how to build models in which foundation (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35.  74
    Jeffrey A. Barrett (1994). The Suggestive Properties of Quantum Mechanics Without the Collapse Postulate. Erkenntnis 41 (2):233 - 252.
    Everett proposed resolving the quantum measurement problem by dropping the nonlinear collapse dynamics from quantum mechanics and taking what is left as a complete physical theory. If one takes such a proposal seriously, then the question becomes how much of the predictive and explanatory power of the standard theory can one recover without the collapse postulate and without adding anything else. Quantum mechanics without the collapse postulate has several suggestive properties, which we will consider in some detail. While these properties (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  36.  49
    Jeffrey A. Barrett (2000). The Persistence of Memory: Surreal Trajectories in Bohm's Theory. Philosophy of Science 67 (4):680-703.
    In this paper I describe the history of the surreal trajectories problem and argue that in fact it is not a problem for Bohm's theory. More specifically, I argue that one can take the particle trajectories predicted by Bohm's theory to be the actual trajectories that particles follow and that there is no reason to suppose that good particle detectors are somehow fooled in the context of the surreal trajectories experiments. Rather than showing that Bohm's theory predicts the wrong particle (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  37.  18
    Wayne Aitken & Jeffrey A. Barrett (2004). Computer Implication and the Curry Paradox. Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (6):631-637.
    There are theoretical limitations to what can be implemented by a computer program. In this paper we are concerned with a limitation on the strength of computer implemented deduction. We use a version of the Curry paradox to arrive at this limitation.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  38.  75
    J. Barrett (1995). Causal Relevance and Nonreductive Physicalism. Erkenntnis 42 (3):339-62.
    It has been argued that nonreductive physicalism leads to epiphenominalism about mental properties: the view that mental events cannot cause behavioral effects by virtue of their mental properties. Recently, attempts have been made to develop accounts of causal relevance for irreducible properties to show that mental properties need not be epiphenomenal. In this paper, I primarily discuss the account of Frank Jackson and Philip Pettit. I show how it can be developed to meet several obvious objections and to capture our (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  39.  36
    Wayne Aitken & Jeffrey A. Barrett (2007). Stability and Paradox in Algorithmic Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (1):61 - 95.
    There is significant interest in type-free systems that allow flexible self-application. Such systems are of interest in property theory, natural language semantics, the theory of truth, theoretical computer science, the theory of classes, and category theory. While there are a variety of proposed type-free systems, there is a particularly natural type-free system that we believe is prototypical: the logic of recursive algorithms. Algorithmic logic is the study of basic statements concerning algorithms and the algorithmic rules of inference between such statements. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40.  96
    William Barrett (1939). On the Existence of an External World. Journal of Philosophy 36 (13):346-354.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  80
    Ignagio Jane (2001). Reflections on Skolem's Relativity of Set-Theoretical Concepts. Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):129-153.
    In this paper an attempt is made to present Skolem's argument, for the relativity of some set-theoretical notions as a sensible one. Skolem's critique of set theory is seen as part of a larger argument to the effect that no conclusive evidence has been given for the existence of uncountable sets. Some replies to Skolem are discussed and are shown not to affect Skolem's position, since they all presuppose the existence of uncountable sets. The paper ends with an assessment of (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  29
    Seth Duncan & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2007). The Role of the Amygdala in Visual Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):190-192.
  43.  59
    Jeffrey A. Barrett (1995). The Distribution Postulate in Bohm's Theory. Topoi 14 (1):45-54.
    On Bohm''s formulation of quantum mechanics particles always have determinate positions and follow continuous trajectories. Bohm''s theory, however, requires a postulate that says that particles are initially distributed in a special way: particles are randomly distributed so that the probability of their positions being represented by a point in any regionR in configuration space is equal to the square of the wave-function integrated overR. If the distribution postulate were false, then the theory would generally fail to make the right statistical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44.  70
    Ignacio Jané (1995). The Role of the Absolute Infinite in Cantor's Conception of Set. Erkenntnis 42 (3):375 - 402.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  45. H. Clark Barrett, Modularity and Design Reincarnation.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46.  16
    Elliott Sober & Martin Barrett (1992). Conjunctive Forks and Temporally Asymmetric Inference. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (1):1 – 23.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  47.  40
    Jonathan Barrett (1991). Really Taking Darwin and the Naturalistic Fallacy Seriously: An Objection to Rottschaefer and Martinsen. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (4):433-437.
    Out of a concern to respect the naturalistic fallacy, Ruse (1986) argues for the possibility of causal, but not justificatory, explanations of morality in terms of evolutionary processes. In a discussion of Ruse's work, Rottschaefer and Martinsen (1990) claim that he erroneously limits the explanatory scope of evolutionary concepts, because he fails to see that one can have objective moral properties without committing either of two forms of the naturalistic fallacy, if one holds that moral properties supervene on non-moral properties. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48.  73
    Ignacio Jané (2005). Review of C. Badesa, The Birth of Model Theory: Löwenheim's Theorem in the Frame of the Theory of Relatives. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 13 (1):91-106.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  14
    Richard R. Sharp & J. Carl Barrett (1999). The Environmental Genome Project and Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (2):175-188.
  50.  76
    Matthew Barrett & Peter Godfrey-smith (2002). Group Selection, Pluralism, and the Evolution of Altruism. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):685–691.
1 — 50 / 1000