Search results for 'Jane Barton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jane Barton (2001). F. Maiullari: L'interpretazione anamorfica dell' Edipo Re. Una nuova lettura della tragedia sofoclea . Pp. xix + 482, figs. Pisa and Rome: Instituti editoriali e poligrafici internazionali, 1999. Paper. ISBN: 88-8147-158-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (01):156-.score: 240.0
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  2. Catherine E. Barton (2000). Richard M. Lerner Catherine E. Barton. In Walter J. Perrig & Alexander Grob (eds.), Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer. Erlbaum. 420.score: 180.0
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  3. Charles Barton (2000). Getting Even Again. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):129-142.score: 60.0
    In his review of Getting Even: Revenge as a Form of Justice (Open Court: Chicago. 1999). Michael Davis challenges the view put forward in the book that revenge is personal retributive punishment. Davis also claims that “the purpose Barton seeks to achieve under the banner of ‘victims rights’ has no more to do with punishment than with revenge.” In my response, I argue that Davis’s views and conclusions are based partly on a misreading of Getting Even, and partly on (...)
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  4. Robert A. Barton (2001). The Coordinated Structure of Mosaic Brain Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):281-282.score: 60.0
    The opposition set up between co-ordinated and mosaic brain evolution distracts from the fact that the two go hand-in-hand. Here and elsewhere (Barton & Harvey 2000), I show that the patterns of co- ordinated evolutionary change among brain structures fit a mosaic evolution model. The concept of overarching developmental constraints is unnecessary and is not supported by the data.
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  5. Ignacio Jané (1995). The Role of the Absolute Infinite in Cantor's Conception of Set. Erkenntnis 42 (3):375 - 402.score: 30.0
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  6. Ignacio Jané (2006). What is Tarski's Common Concept of Consequence? Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (1):1-42.score: 30.0
    In 1936 Tarski sketched a rigorous definition of the concept of logical consequence which, he claimed, agreed quite well with common usage-or, as he also said, with the common concept of consequence. Commentators of Tarski's paper have usually been elusive as to what this common concept is. However, being clear on this issue is important to decide whether Tarski's definition failed (as Etchemendy has contended) or succeeded (as most commentators maintain). I argue that the common concept of consequence that Tarski (...)
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  7. Roy W. Perrett & Charles Barton (1999). Personal Identity, Reductionism, and the Necessity of Origins. Erkenntnis 51 (2-3):277-94.score: 30.0
    A thought that we all entertain at some time or other is that the course of our lives might have been very different from the way they in fact have been, with the consequence that we might have been rather different sorts of persons than we actually are. A less common, but prima facie intelligible thought is that we might never have existed at all, though someone rather like us did. Arguably, any plausible theory of personal identity should be able (...)
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  8. Ignacio Jané (1993). A Critical Appraisal of Second-Order Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 14 (1):67-86.score: 30.0
    Because of its capacity to characterize mathematical concepts and structures?a capacity which first-order languages clearly lack?second-order languages recommend themselves as a convenient framework for much of mathematics, including set theory. This paper is about the credentials of second-order logic:the reasons for it to be considered logic, its relations with set theory, and especially the efficacy with which it performs its role of the underlying logic of set theory.
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  9. Ignasi Jané (2010). Idealist and Realist Elements in Cantor's Approach to Set Theory. Philosophia Mathematica 18 (2):193-226.score: 30.0
    There is an apparent tension between the open-ended aspect of the ordinal sequence and the assumption that the set-theoretical universe is fully determinate. This tension is already present in Cantor, who stressed the incompletable character of the transfinite number sequence in Grundlagen and avowed the definiteness of the totality of sets and numbers in subsequent philosophical publications and in correspondence. The tension is particularly discernible in his late distinction between sets and inconsistent multiplicities. I discuss Cantor’s contrasting views, and I (...)
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  10. Charles K. B. Barton (2003). Restorative Justice: The Empowerment Model. Hawkins Press.score: 30.0
    There will also be two sample role plays in the book and additionally there will be four complete role plays available on our website, closer to publication ...
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  11. Ignacio Jané & Gabriel Uzquiano (2004). Well- and Non-Well-Founded Fregean Extensions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (5):437-465.score: 30.0
    George Boolos has described an interpretation of a fragment of ZFC in a consistent second-order theory whose only axiom is a modification of Frege's inconsistent Axiom V. We build on Boolos's interpretation and study the models of a variety of such theories obtained by amending Axiom V in the spirit of a limitation of size principle. After providing a complete structural description of all well-founded models, we turn to the non-well-founded ones. We show how to build models in which foundation (...)
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  12. I. Jane (2010). Idealist and Realist Elements in Cantor's Approach to Set Theory. Philosophia Mathematica 18 (2):193-226.score: 30.0
    There is an apparent tension between the open-ended aspect of the ordinal sequence and the assumption that the set-theoretical universe is fully determinate. This tension is already present in Cantor, who stressed the incompletable character of the transfinite number sequence in Grundlagen and avowed the definiteness of the totality of sets and numbers in subsequent philosophical publications and in correspondence. The tension is particularly discernible in his late distinction between sets and inconsistent multiplicities. I discuss Cantor’s contrasting views, and I (...)
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  13. Kristen R. Monroe, Michael C. Barton & Ute Klingemann (1990). Altruism and the Theory of Rational Action: Rescuers of Jews in Nazi Europe. Ethics 101 (1):103-122.score: 30.0
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  14. Ignacio Jané (2005). Review of C. Badesa, The Birth of Model Theory: Löwenheim's Theorem in the Frame of the Theory of Relatives. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 13 (1):91-106.score: 30.0
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  15. David Barton (1999). The "Theaetetus" on How We Think. Phronesis 44 (3):163 - 180.score: 30.0
    I argue that Plato's purpose in the discussion of false belief in the "Theaetetus" is to entertain and then to reject the idea that thinking is a kind of mental grasping. The interpretation allows us to make good sense of Plato's discussion of 'other-judging' (189c-190e), of his remarks about mathematical error (195d-196c), and most importantly, of the initial statement of the puzzle about falsity (188a-c). That puzzle shows that if we insist on conceiving of the relation between thought and its (...)
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  16. S. Chow Wing, P. Wu Jane & K. K. Chan Allan (2009). The Effects of Environmental Factors on the Behavior of Chinese Managers in the Information Age in China. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4).score: 30.0
    This paper examines the effects of environmental factors on the ethical behavior of managers using computers at work in Mainland China. In this study, environmental factors refer to senior management, peer groups, company policies, professional practices, and legal considerations. Ethical behaviors include attitudes to disclosure, protection of privacy, conflict of interest, personal conduct, social responsibility, and integrity. A questionnaire survey was used for data collection, and 125 mainland Chinese managers participated in the study. The results show that peer groups, professional (...)
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  17. Ignagio Jane (2001). Reflections on Skolem's Relativity of Set-Theoretical Concepts. Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):129-153.score: 30.0
    In this paper an attempt is made to present Skolem's argument, for the relativity of some set-theoretical notions as a sensible one. Skolem's critique of set theory is seen as part of a larger argument to the effect that no conclusive evidence has been given for the existence of uncountable sets. Some replies to Skolem are discussed and are shown not to affect Skolem's position, since they all presuppose the existence of uncountable sets. The paper ends with an assessment of (...)
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  18. Lane E. Volpe & Robert A. Barton (2009). Attachment and Sexual Strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):43-44.score: 30.0
    Sexual behaviour and mate choice are key intervening variables between attachment and life histories. We propose a set of predictions relating attachment, reproductive strategies, and mate choice criteria.
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  19. Thomas D. Barton (1999). Law and Science in the Enlightenment and Beyond. Social Epistemology 13 (2):99 – 112.score: 30.0
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  20. Kevin Barton, Jonathan Fugelsang & Daniel Smilek (2009). Inhibiting Beliefs Demands Attention. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (3):250 – 267.score: 30.0
    Research across a variety of domains has found that people fail to evaluate statistical information in an atheoretical manner. Rather, people tend to evaluate statistical information in light of their pre-existing beliefs and experiences. The locus of these biases continues to be hotly debated. In two experiments we evaluate the degree to which reasoning when relevant beliefs are readily accessible (i.e., when reasoning with Belief-Laden content) versus when relevant beliefs are not available (i.e., when reasoning with Non-Belief-Laden content) differentially demands (...)
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  21. Mary Ann Barton (1992). Japanese American Relocation: Who is Responsible? Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (2):142-157.score: 30.0
  22. Robert A. Barton (2006). Neuroscientists Need to Be Evolutionarily Challenged. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):13-14.score: 30.0
    Evolutionary theory and methods are central to understanding the design of organisms, including their brains. This book does much to demonstrate the value of evolutionary neuroscience. Further work is needed to clarify the ways that neural systems evolved in general (specifically, the interaction between mosaic and coordinated evolution of brain components), and phylogenetic methods should be given a more prominent role in the analysis of comparative data.
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  23. Ignacio Jané (2003). Remarks on Second-Order Consequence. Theoria 18 (2):179-187.score: 30.0
    Tarski’s definition of logical consequence can take different forms when implemented in second order languages, depending on what counts as a model. In the canonical, or standard, version, a model is just an ordinary structure and the (monadic) second-order variables are meant to range over all subsets of its domain. We discuss the dependence of canonical second-order consequence on set theory and raise doubts on the assumption that canonical consequence is a definite relation.
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  24. Ignacio Jane (1997). Theoremhood and Logical Consequence. Theoria 12 (1):139-160.score: 30.0
    In this paper, Tarskis notion of Logical Consequence is viewed as a special case of the more general notion of being a theorem of an axiomatic theory. As was recognized by Tarski, the material adequacy of his definition depends on having the distinction between logical and non logical constants right, but we find Tarskis analysis persuasive even if we dont agree on what constants are logical. This accords with the view put forward in this paper that Tarski indeed captures the (...)
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  25. Kevin Barton, Jonathan Fugelsang & Daniel Smilek (2011). Inhibiting Beliefs Demands Attention. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (3):250-267.score: 30.0
    Research across a variety of domains has found that people fail to evaluate statistical information in an atheoretical manner. Rather, people tend to evaluate statistical information in light of their pre-existing beliefs and experiences. The locus of these biases continues to be hotly debated. In two experiments we evaluate the degree to which reasoning when relevant beliefs are readily accessible (i.e., when reasoning with Belief-Laden content) versus when relevant beliefs are not available (i.e., when reasoning with Non-Belief-Laden content) differentially demands (...)
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  26. Robert A. Barton (1997). Neural Constructivism: How Mammals Make Modules. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):556-557.score: 30.0
    Although the developmental arguments in the Quartz & Sejnowski (Q&S) target article may have intrinsic merit, they do not warrant the authors' conclusion that innate modular architectures are absent or minimal, and that neocortical evolution is simply a progression toward more flexible representational structures. Modular architectures can develop and evolve in tandem with sub-cortical specialisation. I present comparative evidence for the co-evolution of specific thalamic and cortical visual pathways.
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  27. Ignacio Jané (1988). Lógica Y Ontología. Theoria 4 (1):81-106.score: 30.0
    In this paper we discuss the way logical consequence depends on what sets there are. We try to find out what set-theoretical assumptions have to be made to determine a logic, i.e., to give a definite answer to whether any given argument is correct. Consideration of second order logic -which is left highly indetermined by the usual set-theoretical axioms- prompts us to suggest a slightly different but natural nation of logical consequence, which reduces second order logic indeterminacy without interfering with (...)
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  28. Adrien Barton, Shabnam Mousavi & Jeffrey R. Stevens (2007). A Statistical Taxonomy and Another “Chance” for Natural Frequencies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):255-256.score: 30.0
    The conclusions of Barbey & Sloman (B&S) crucially depend on evidence for different representations of statistical information. Unfortunately, a muddled distinction made among these representations calls into question the authors' conclusions. We clarify some notions of statistical representations which are often confused in the literature. These clarifications, combined with new empirical evidence, do not support a dual-process model of judgment.
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  29. George A. Barton (1906). Book Review:The Prophet of Nazareth. Nathaniel Schmidt. [REVIEW] Ethics 17 (1):110-.score: 30.0
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  30. L. Fisher-Jeffes, C. Barton & F. Finlay (2007). Clinicians' Knowledge of Informed Consent. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):181-184.score: 30.0
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  31. Miles Barton (1987). Animal Rights. Gloucester Press.score: 30.0
  32. John Barton (1998). Ethics and the Old Testament. Trinity Press International.score: 30.0
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  33. Joseph Edwin Barton (1948). Purpose and Admiration. London, Christophers.score: 30.0
     
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  34. William Ernest Barton (1966). The Moral Challenge of Communism: Some Ethical Aspects of Marxist-Leninist Society. London, Friends Home Service Committee.score: 30.0
     
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  35. Miles Barton (1989). Why Do People Harm Animals? Gloucester Press.score: 30.0
     
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  36. K. Jane (1994). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (2).score: 30.0
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  37. Judy D. Whipps (2004). Jane Addams's Social Thought as a Model for a Pragmatist-Feminist Communitarianism. Hypatia 19 (2):118-133.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that communitarian philosophy can be an important philosophic resource for feminist thinkers, particularly when considered in the light of Jane Addams's (1860-1935) feminist-pragmatism. Addams's communitarianism requires progressive change as well as a moral duty to seek out diverse voices. Contrary to some contemporary communitarians, Addams extends her concept of community to include interdependent global communities, such as the global community of women peace workers.
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  38. Charles R. Pigden (2012). A 'Sensible Knave'? Hume, Jane Austen and Mr Elliot. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):465-480.score: 24.0
    This paper deals with what I take to be one woman’s literary response to a philosophical problem. The woman is Jane Austen, the problem is the rationality of Hume’s ‘sensible knave’, and Austen’s response is to deepen the problem. Despite his enthusiasm for virtue, Hume reluctantly concedes in the EPM that injustice can be a rational strategy for ‘sensible knaves’, intelligent but selfish agents who feel no aversion towards thoughts of villainy or baseness. Austen agrees, but adds that ABSENT (...)
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  39. Inmaculada Cobos Fernández (2001). A Journey to Madness: Jane Bowles's Narrative and Schizophrenia. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (4):265-283.score: 24.0
    This work is a study of Jane Bowles's madness as revealed through several of her literary works and her life story. On a parallel plane, it is an epistemological exploration of the points of intersection between humanistic psychoanalysis and deconstructive literary criticism. Here we consider the schizoid traits in Two Serious Ladies (1943) and in “Camp Cataract” (1949), using the theories developed in this area by the psychiatrist R. D. Laing (1927–1989).
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  40. Alan Van Wyk (2012). What Matters Now? Review of Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 8 (2):130-136.score: 24.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-US; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} Review of Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things.
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  41. James Lindemann Nelson (2014). Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.score: 24.0
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on (...)
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  42. Michael McKenna, Ultimacy and Sweet Jane.score: 18.0
    Some people, they like to go out dancing And other peoples, they have to work And there’s even some evil mothers Well they’re gonna tell you that everything is just dirt You know, that women, never really faint And that villains always blink their eyes And that, children are the only ones who really blush And that, life is just to die. And, everyone who had a heart, They wouldn’t turn around and break it And that everyone who played a (...)
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  43. Leonard J. Waks & Jane Roland Martin (2007). Encounter: The Educational Metamorphoses of Jane Roland Martin. Education and Culture 23 (1):73-83.score: 18.0
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  44. Peter Gratton, Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Levi Bryant & Paul Ennis (2010). Interviews: Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant and Paul Ennis. Speculations 1 (1):84-134.score: 18.0
    The context for these interviews was a seminar [Peter Gratton] conducted on speculative realism in the Spring 2010. There has been great interest in speculative realism and one reason Gratton surmise[s] is not just the arguments offered, though [Gratton doesn't] want to take away from them; each of these scholars are vivid writers and great pedagogues, many of whom are in constant contact with their readers via their weblogs. Thus these interviews provided an opportunity to forward student questions about their (...)
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  45. E. M. Dadlez (2008). Form Affects Content: Reading Jane Austen. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 315-329.score: 18.0
    What does it mean to hold that the significant aspects of a literary passage cannot be captured in a paraphrase? Does a change in the description of an act "risk producing a different act" from the one described? Using Jane Austen as an example, we'll consider whether her use of metaphor and symbol really amounts to calling someone a prick, whether her narrative voice changes what it is that is expressed, and whether comedy can hold just as much (...)
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  46. Jennifer Bajorek (2011). Jane Alexander's Anti-Anthropomorphic Photographs. Angelaki 16 (1):79 - 96.score: 18.0
    This essay sets out from a reading of two photomontage projects by South African artist Jane Alexander, ?Adventure Centre? (2000) and ?Survey: Cape of Good Hope? (2005?09), one of Alexander's ongoing ?survey? projects, and remarks on the overwhelming impulse on the part of critics and interpreters to anthropomorphize the figures appearing in the photomontage images. It goes on to explore the hypothesis that Alexander's work in fact resists or refuses these attempts at anthropomorphization, and that this resistance is connected (...)
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  47. Beth Eddy (2010). Struggle or Mutual Aid: Jane Addams, Petr Kropotkin, and the Progressive Encounter with Social Darwinism. The Pluralist 5 (1):21-43.score: 18.0
    The year is 1901. Two minor celebrities from opposite corners of the globe share an evening meal in Chicago. Both are politically left-leaning, both are evolutionists of a sort, both are concerned with the plight of the poor in the face of the escalation of the Industrial Revolution. The Russian man has been giving a series of lectures to the people of Chicago; he is staying at the American woman's settlement house-Hull House. They are Jane Addams, Chicago's activist social (...)
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  48. Paul Kidder (2008). The Urbanist Ethics of Jane Jacobs. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):253 – 266.score: 18.0
    This article examines ethical themes in the works of the celebrated writer on urban affairs, Jane Jacobs. Jacobs' early works on cities develop an implicit, 'ecological' conception of the human good, one that connects it closely with economic and political goals while emphasizing the intrinsic good of the community formed in pursuit of those goals. Later works develop an explicit ethics, arguing that governing and trading require two different schemes of values and virtues. While Jacobs intended this ethics to (...)
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  49. Mathew A. Foust (2008). Perplexities of Filiality: Confucius and Jane Addams on the Private/Public Distinction. Asian Philosophy 18 (2):149 – 166.score: 18.0
    This article compares the ways in which the classic Western philosophical division between the private and public spheres is challenged by an apparently disparate pair of thinkers—Confucius and Jane Addams. It is argued that insofar as the public and private distinction is that between the sphere of the family and that outside of the family, Confucius and Addams offer ways of rethinking that distinction. While Confucius endorses a porous relation between these realms, Addams advocates a relation that fosters reconstructive (...)
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