108 found
Sort by:
  1. Jane Duran (forthcoming). Aesthetic Discrimination: Evaluation of Pieces by Style, Period, and Site. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jane Duran (forthcoming). Christianity and the Education of Women in Advance. Philosophy and Theology.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jane Duran (forthcoming). Mono Lake in Advance. International Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jane Duran (forthcoming). Naturalism and Mannerism in Indian Miniatures. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jane Duran (forthcoming). The Nagaraja: Symbol and Symbolism in Hindu Art and Iconography. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Earl Stewart & Jane Duran (forthcoming). Black Essentialism: The Art of Jazz Rap. Philosophy of Music Education Review.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jane Duran (2014). Anscombe and “Hume and Julius Caesar”. Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):668-674.
    This article analyzes Elizabeth Anscombe's short piece “Hume and Julius Caesar” from the standpoint of traditional foundationalist epistemic criteria, and concludes that while Anscombe may be right about finding a mistake in Hume, she has also failed to fill in her own arguments in the way that her overall aim requires. Special allusion is made to the work of J. L. Austin, especially insofar as that work has to do with reformulating sentences so that they appear to meet foundationalist criteria.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jane Duran (2014). Ellen Gates Starr and Julia Lathrop: Hull House and Philosophy. The Pluralist 9 (1):1-13.
    Much work has recently been done on Jane Addams, her writings, and the general atmosphere and thought associated with Hull House and other settlement places in American cities.1 But although we might think of Addams and her work as the center of the Hull House effort, many other women (and a few men) were involved in the efforts, and the strengths that they brought to bear on the activities in Chicago in the early part of the twentieth century need to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jane Duran (2013). Early English Empiricism and the Work of Catharine Trotter Cockburn. Metaphilosophy 44 (4):485-495.
    This article examines the work of the seventeenth-century thinker Catharine Trotter Cockburn with an eye toward explication of her trenchant empiricism, and the foundations upon which it rested. It is argued that part of the originality of Cockburn's work has to do with her consistent line of thought with regard to evidence from the senses and the process of abstract conceptualization; in this she differed strongly from some of her contemporaries. The work of Martha Brandt Bolton and Fidelis Morgan is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jane Duran (2013). NGOs and Growth. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (1):27-34.
    Feminist standpoint theory, as a tool for examining women’s lives in less developed nations, is scrutinized from the vantage of NGO-driven work and its changes in women’s routines. Work from Bangladesh and Mexico is cited, and commentary from workers in UN agencies and other non-governmental organizations is used.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jane Duran (2013). Plath and the Philosophical Novel. Philosophy and Literature 37 (1):228-238.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jane Duran (2013). Tudor History and Women's Theology. Philosophy and Theology 25 (1):63-78.
    Examining the writings of Katherine Parr both from the standpoint of metaphysical issues of her time and her status as a writer of the Tudor era, it is concluded that Queen Katherine had a developed humanist ontology, and one that coincided with a great deal of the new learning of the Henrician period, whether stridently Protestant or not. Analyses from James, Dubrow, and McConica are alluded to, and a comparison is made to some of the currents at work in English (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jane Duran (2012). Reintroduction of Species. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):137-145.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jane Duran (2011). Teresian Influence on the Work of Edith Stein. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (3):242 - 254.
    Edith Stein is honored today not only because of her sainthood but because of what is now seen as important and groundbreaking work in phenomenology done under especially arduous conditions. Thus it may be said with some accuracy that Stein is, among philosophers, in the comparatively rare category of being acknowledged both for her work and her exemplary life. Writing on Stein has standardly proceeded with an emphasis on the biographical factors that caused her to live and write as she (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jane Duran (2010). Edith Stein and the Body-Soul-Spirit at the Center of Holistic Formation. By Marian Maskulak. Heythrop Journal 51 (3):515-516.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jane Duran (2010). Margaret Fuller and Transcendental Feminism. The Pluralist 5 (1):65-72.
    Margaret Fuller's name today often appears when the Transcendentalists in general are mentioned-we may hear of her in the course of writing on Emerson, or Bronson Alcott-but not nearly enough work about Margaret herself, her thought, and her remarkable childhood has been done in recent times.1 Interestingly enough, her name surfaces in connection with some theorizing done about same-sex relationships, but the great import of Fuller's editing of "The Dial," a periodical of the time, her authoring of Woman in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jane Duran (2010). Slavery in Global Context. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):61-69.
    The work of Cox, Bales, Dingwaney, and others is cited in an effort to construct an argument about the special rights violations of contemporary slavery. It is contended that two forms, debt bondage and sexual slavery, are related and bear close examination.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. John Kaag, Beth Eddy, Tommy J. Curry, Jane Duran, Steffen Dix, Seyed Hassan Hosseini & Sami Pihlström (2010). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Vii). The Pluralist 5 (1).
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jane Duran (2009). Bronson Alcott: Transcendentalism in the Personal. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 45 (2):231-239.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jane Duran (2009). Education and Feminist Aesthetics: Gauguin and the Exotic. Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (4):pp. 88-95.
  21. Jane Duran (2009). Arendt and the Social: 'Reflections on Little Rock'. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (4):605-611.
  22. Jane Duran (2008). Global Bioethics and Feminist Epistemology. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):303-310.
    Lines of argument to support the notion that global bioethics can use work from feminist epistemology are set out, and much of the support for such contentions comes from specific cases of ethical issues in indigenous cultures. Theorists such as Kuhse, Arizpe, Egnor and Bumiller are cited, and it is concluded that local feminist epistemologies often conflict with standard ethical views, but that the failure to incorporate feminist thought undercuts hopes to establish a viable bioethics on an international scale.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Therese Boos Dykeman, Eve Browning, Judith Chelius Stark, Jane Duran, Marilyn Fischer, Lois Frankel, Edward Fullbrook, Jo Ellen Jacobs, Vicki Harper, Joy Laine, Kate Lindemann, Elizabeth Minnich, Andrea Nye, Margaret Simons, Audun Solli, Catherine Villanueva Gardner, Mary Ellen Waithe, Karen J. Warren & Henry West (2008). An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jane Duran (2007). Canine Minds, Human Minds. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):109-115.
    Sheldrake’s work on canine cognition is examined from more than one standpoint. His use of the terms “social field” and “morphic field” is delineated, and in addition recent work on ethology and cognition, done by Allen and Bekoff, is set out and contrasted with Sheldrake’s theorizing. The importance of the allusion to a number of comparatively unexamined concepts, including some borrowed from research on extrasensory perception, is analyzed and it is concluded that Sheldrake has yet to establish his case in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jane Duran (2007). Edith Stein, Ontology and Belief. Heythrop Journal 48 (5):707–712.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jane Duran (2007). The Philosophical Camus. Philosophical Forum 38 (4):365–371.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jane Duran (2007). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century,. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jane Duran (2007). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, And: Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher (Review). Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):200-204.
  29. Earl L. Stewart & Jane Duran (2007). Scott Joplin and the Quest for Identity. Journal of Aesthetic Education 41 (2):94-99.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jane Duran (2006). Eight Women Philosophers: Theory, Politics, and Feminism. University of Illinois Press.
    Overviews -- Hildegard of Bingen -- Anne Conway -- Mary Astell -- Mary Wollstonecraft -- Harriet Taylor Mill -- Edith Stein -- Simone Weil -- Simone de Beauvoir -- Conclusions.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jane Duran (2006). Yoruba Work and Art Categorization. Philosophia Africana 9 (1):35-40.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jane Duran (2005). AngloModern: Painting and Modernity in Britain and the United States (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (2):118-120.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jane Duran (2005). Bilingual Aesthetics: A New Sentimental Education (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (3):121-123.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jane Duran (2005). Canyons, Gulches, and Rocks. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):121-127.
    An argument is made for the special preservationist value of rock formations and other geological features, independent of their biotic status or aesthetic appeal. The work of Passmore, Hay and other contemporary ecological thinkers is cited.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jane Duran (2005). C. L. R. James, Social Identity, and the Black Rebellion. Philosophia Africana 8 (1):1-10.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jane Duran (2005). Realism, Positivism and Reference. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (2):401 - 407.
    Depending on the realist or instrumentalist twist that is given to positivism, interesting arguments can be made for both causal and classical theories of reference with regard to the use of scientific terms in the language of theory. But my claim is that the rigid foundationalism that supports the theoretical terms via the correspondence rules of the Received View undercuts the notion that it is possible to argue coherently for a causal theory of reference as allied to a positivistic view.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jane Duran (2004). A Postmodern Tonantzín. Journal of Aesthetic Education 38 (2):88-94.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jane Duran (2004). Hume on the Gentler Sex. Philosophia 31 (3-4):487-500.
  39. Jane Duran (2004). Sartre, Gender Theory and the Possibility of Transcendence. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (3):265-281.
    Several lines of analysis support the contention that Sartre’s theorizing can be used to bolster feminist concerns. Both philosophical and literary works are examined, and Notebooks for an Ethics, The Flies and The Respectful Prostitute are examined at some length. The commentary of Flynn, Bell and Pellauer is employed, and in general the argument relies on the notion that the construction of the for-itself, along with Sartre’s generalized portrayal of the Other, can be used for feminist purposes. Key Words: gender (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jane Duran (2004). Virginia Woolf, Time, and the Real. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):300-308.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jane Duran (2003). Aesthetics, Epistemics, and Feminist Theory. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (1):32-39.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jane Duran (2003). Feminist Epistemology and Social Epistemics. Social Epistemology 17 (1):45 – 54.
    Recent work in naturalised epistemology has focused almost exclusively on the intersection of cognitive psychology and theory of knowledge; work from sociolinguistics is just now beginning to gain ground. At the same time, feminist epistemologies have striven to articulate the precise paths of connectedness and relatedness that gynocentric theory standardly postulates as being characteristic of female ways of knowing. This paper attempts to articulate the intersection of sociolinguistically naturalised epistemology and feminist theory of knowledge. A model of gynocentrically centred justification (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jane Duran (2002). Two Arguments Against Foundationalism. Philosophia 29 (1-4):241-252.
    Bringing to bear two major lines of argument, I claim that foundationalism is vitiated by its reliance (in its various forms) on privileged access, and by its noninstantiability. The notion of privileged access is examined, and the status of propositions said to be evocative of privileged access addressed. Noninstantiability is viewed through the current project of naturalizing epistemology, and naturalized alternatives to the rigorous foundationalism of the normative epistemologists are brought forward.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Jane Duran (2002). Wittgenstein, Feminism and Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (3):321-336.
    An attempt is made to try to delineate the common ground of feminist concerns and the work of Wittgenstein by alluding to several areas of theory - among them are the orality-literacy distinction, the notion of the universal, and the realm of particulars. I cite portions of both the Tractatus and the Investigations, and utilize the work of commentators such as Anscombe, Fogelin and Genova. The broader argument is that Wittgenstein's turn away from a kind of logical atomism is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Paul Cortios Ritual, Jane Duran, Two Arguments Against Foundatationalism, David Kaspar, Sara Worley & Tjeerd B. Jongeling (2002). Philip Montague On Punishment 1 John Wright The Explanatory Role of Realism 35 Stephn Kershnar The Structure of Rights Forfeiture in the Context Of Culpable Wrongdoing 57 Paul M. Huges The Logic of Temptation 89. [REVIEW] Philosophia 29.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jane Duran (2001). A Holistically Deweyan Feminism. Metaphilosophy 32 (3):279-292.
    The argument that a holistic analysis of Dewey's work, drawing not only on the major portions subject to extensive commentary (such as Experience and Nature) but also on his aesthetics, provides fuel for feminist theorizing is sustained by advertence to the standard commentary and also to new work in aesthetic feminism itself. Sleeper, Rorty, Hickman and Russell are cited, and the recent resurgence of interest in developing the intersection between analytic aesthetics and feminist aesthetics is alluded to. It is concluded (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jane Duran (2001). Religious Epistemology: Naturalizing a Point of View. Heythrop Journal 42 (4):480–488.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jane Duran (2001). Worlds of Knowing: Global Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge.
    Jane Duran's Worlds of Knowing begins to fill an enormous gap in the literature of feminist epistemology: a wide-ranging, cross-cultural primer on worldviews and epistemologies of various cultures and their appropriations by indigenous feminist movements in those cultures. It is the much needed epistemological counterpart to work on cross-cultural feminist social and political philosophy. This project is absolutely breath-taking in scope, yet a manageable read for anyone with some background in feminist theory, history, or anthropology. Duran draws many comparisons and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jane Duran (2000). A Problem Taken From Bonjour's Coherentism. Idealistic Studies 30 (1):1-6.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jane Duran (2000). Mary Astell: A Pre-Humean Christian Empiricist and Feminist. In Cecile T. Tougas & Sara Ebenreck (eds.), Presenting Women Philosophers. Temple University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 108