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Jane Duran [124]Jane Miller Duran [1]
  1. Jane Duran (1994). The Reinterpreting Reader: An Analysis of Discourse and the Feminine. Philosophy and Social Criticism 20 (3):89-101.
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  2.  53
    Jane Duran (1995). The Possibility of a Feminist Epistemology. Philosophy and Social Criticism 21 (4):127-140.
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  3.  4
    Jane Duran (2015). The Problem of Polygamy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (2):191-198.
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  4. Jane Duran (1995). Toward a Feminist Epistemology. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Drawing on recent advances in analytic epistemology, feminist scholarship, and philosophy of science, Jane Duran's Toward a Feminist Epistemology is the first book that spells out in the detail required by a supportable epistemology what a feminist theory of knowledge would entail.
     
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  5.  17
    Jane Duran (2013). Early English Empiricism and the Work of Catharine Trotter Cockburn. Metaphilosophy 44 (4):485-495.
    This article examines the work of the seventeenth-century thinker Catharine Trotter Cockburn with an eye toward explication of her trenchant empiricism, and the foundations upon which it rested. It is argued that part of the originality of Cockburn's work has to do with her consistent line of thought with regard to evidence from the senses and the process of abstract conceptualization; in this she differed strongly from some of her contemporaries. The work of Martha Brandt Bolton and Fidelis Morgan is (...)
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  6. Therese Boos Dykeman, Eve Browning, Judith Chelius Stark, Jane Duran, Marilyn Fischer, Lois Frankel, Edward Fullbrook, Jo Ellen Jacobs, Vicki Harper, Joy Laine, Kate Lindemann, Elizabeth Minnich, Andrea Nye, Margaret Simons, Audun Solli, Catherine Villanueva Gardner, Mary Ellen Waithe, Karen J. Warren & Henry West (eds.) (2008). An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This is a unique, groundbreaking study in the history of philosophy, combining leading men and women philosophers across 2600 years of Western philosophy, covering key foundational topics, (...)
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  7.  24
    Jane Duran (1998). Ajanta and Ellora. Philosophical Inquiry 20 (3-4):64-70.
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  8.  2
    Jane Duran (2015). Christine de Pisan and the Development of a Philosophical View. Philosophy and Theology 27 (2):337-349.
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  9.  2
    Jane Duran (2015). Lydia Maria Child: Abolitionism and the New England Spirit. The Pluralist 10 (3):261-273.
    lydia maria child was one of the best-known women intellectuals of the nineteenth century on the American scene, and yet her name is not often heard today.1 Although it might seem gratuitous to attempt to label a thinker—and, in some cases, not only unnecessary, but demeaning—there is ample reason to think that Child can be called a transcendentalist, as well as an early abolitionist and feminist. In any case, the independent and very forward-looking work of this woman thinker of her (...)
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  10.  55
    Jane Duran (1996). The Stupa in Indian Art: Symbols and the Symbolic. British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (1):66-74.
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  11.  53
    Jane Duran (2002). Two Arguments Against Foundationalism. Philosophia 29 (1-4):241-252.
    Bringing to bear two major lines of argument, I claim that foundationalism is vitiated by its reliance (in its various forms) on privileged access, and by its noninstantiability. The notion of privileged access is examined, and the status of propositions said to be evocative of privileged access addressed. Noninstantiability is viewed through the current project of naturalizing epistemology, and naturalized alternatives to the rigorous foundationalism of the normative epistemologists are brought forward.
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  12. Jane Duran (2000). Mary Astell: A Pre-Humean Christian Empiricist and Feminist. In Cecile T. Tougas & Sara Ebenreck (eds.), Presenting Women Philosophers. Temple University Press
  13.  1
    Jane Duran (2016). Libertarianism and the Sex Trade Argument. Think 15 (42):139-150.
    The work of MacKinnon, Pheterson and others is cited to examine what are commonly described as libertarian arguments for the decriminalization of sex work. Original Marxist lines of analysis are also examined, and it is concluded that the dangers of sex work outweigh the notion that there is no compelling state interest in suppressing it.
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  14.  10
    Jane Duran (2006). Eight Women Philosophers: Theory, Politics, and Feminism. University of Illinois Press.
    Overviews -- Hildegard of Bingen -- Anne Conway -- Mary Astell -- Mary Wollstonecraft -- Harriet Taylor Mill -- Edith Stein -- Simone Weil -- Simone de Beauvoir -- Conclusions.
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  15.  34
    Jane Duran (1989). Anne Viscountess Conway: A Seventeenth Century Rationalist. Hypatia 4 (1):64 - 79.
    The work of Spinoza, Descartes and Leibniz is cited in an attempt to develop, both expositorily and critically, the philosophy of Anne Viscountess Conway. Broadly, it is contended that Conway's metaphysics, epistemology and account of the passions not only bear intriguing comparison with the work of the other well-known rationalists, but supersede them in some ways, particularly insofar as the notions of substance and ontological hierarchy are concerned. Citing the commentary of Loptson and Carolyn Merchant, and alluding to other (...)
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  16.  15
    Jane Duran (1991). Folk Terms and Agency. Philosophica 47 (1):111-124.
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  17.  18
    Jane Duran (2014). Ellen Gates Starr and Julia Lathrop: Hull House and Philosophy. The Pluralist 9 (1):1-13.
    Much work has recently been done on Jane Addams, her writings, and the general atmosphere and thought associated with Hull House and other settlement places in American cities.1 But although we might think of Addams and her work as the center of the Hull House effort, many other women (and a few men) were involved in the efforts, and the strengths that they brought to bear on the activities in Chicago in the early part of the twentieth century need to (...)
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  18.  22
    Jane Duran (2000). Rape as a Form of Torture. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):191-196.
    Using material taken from contemporary feminist theory and also from work on human rights, it is argued that rape is a form of torture, and that it operates on powerful levels, both literally and metaphorically. Part of the argument is that rape has achieved the status it has as political force for exploitation because of strong beliefs about cultural reproduction and about the roles that women play in cultural reproduction.
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  19.  13
    Jane Duran (2000). A Problem Taken From Bonjour's Coherentism. Idealistic Studies 30 (1):1-6.
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  20.  52
    Jane Duran (1993). Escher and Parmigianino: A Study in Paradox. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (3):239-245.
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  21.  53
    Jane Duran (1987). Collingwood and Intentionality. British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (1):32-38.
  22.  50
    Jane Duran (1997). Syntax, Imagery and Naturalization. Philosophia 25 (1-4):373-387.
  23.  16
    Jane Duran (1984). Descriptive Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 15 (3-4):185-195.
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  24.  8
    Jane Duran (2013). Tudor History and Women's Theology. Philosophy and Theology 25 (1):63-78.
    Examining the writings of Katherine Parr both from the standpoint of metaphysical issues of her time and her status as a writer of the Tudor era, it is concluded that Queen Katherine had a developed humanist ontology, and one that coincided with a great deal of the new learning of the Henrician period, whether stridently Protestant or not. Analyses from James, Dubrow, and McConica are alluded to, and a comparison is made to some of the currents at work in English (...)
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  25.  5
    Jane Duran (1988). Notes Et Discussions: Reductionism and the Naturalization of Epistemology. Dialectica 42 (4):295-306.
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  26.  18
    Jane Duran (1993). The Intersection of Pragmatism and Feminism. Hypatia 8 (2):159 - 171.
    I cite areas of pragmatism and feminism that have an intersection with or an appeal to the other, including the notions of the universal and/or normative, and foundationalist lines in general. I deal with three areas from each perspective and develop the notion of their intersection. Finally, the paper discusses the importance of a pragmatic view for women's lives and the importance of psychoanalytic theory for finding another area where pragmatism and feminism mesh.
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  27.  10
    Jane Duran (1988). "I'm Sorry, Dave, I'm Afraid I Can't Do That": Non-Nomolical Uses for Beliefs. Philosophica 41.
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  28.  45
    Jane Duran (2003). Feminist Epistemology and Social Epistemics. Social Epistemology 17 (1):45 – 54.
    Recent work in naturalised epistemology has focused almost exclusively on the intersection of cognitive psychology and theory of knowledge; work from sociolinguistics is just now beginning to gain ground. At the same time, feminist epistemologies have striven to articulate the precise paths of connectedness and relatedness that gynocentric theory standardly postulates as being characteristic of female ways of knowing. This paper attempts to articulate the intersection of sociolinguistically naturalised epistemology and feminist theory of knowledge. A model of gynocentrically centred justification (...)
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  29.  9
    Jane Duran (1992). Defeasible and Proud of It. Philosophical Inquiry 14 (3-4):34-47.
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  30. Jane Duran (1998). Philosophies of Science/Feminist Theories. Westview Press.
    This book presents the current feminist critique of science and the philosophy of science in such a way that students of philosophy of science, philosophers, feminist theorists, and scientists will find the material accessible and intellectually rigorous.Contemporary feminist debate, as well as the debate brought on by the radical critics of science, assumes—incorrectly—that certain movements in philosophy of science and science-driven theory are understood in their dynamics as well as in their details. All too often, labels such as “Kuhnian” or (...)
     
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  31.  9
    Jane Duran (1994). The Attack on Methodological Solipsism. Philosophica 53:81-90.
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  32.  8
    Jane Duran (1986). A Contextualist Modification of Cornman. Philosophia 16 (3-4):377-388.
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  33.  29
    Jane Duran (2010). Margaret Fuller and Transcendental Feminism. The Pluralist 5 (1):65-72.
    Margaret Fuller's name today often appears when the Transcendentalists in general are mentioned-we may hear of her in the course of writing on Emerson, or Bronson Alcott-but not nearly enough work about Margaret herself, her thought, and her remarkable childhood has been done in recent times.1 Interestingly enough, her name surfaces in connection with some theorizing done about same-sex relationships, but the great import of Fuller's editing of "The Dial," a periodical of the time, her authoring of Woman (...)
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  34.  23
    Jane Duran (2011). Teresian Influence on the Work of Edith Stein. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (3):242 - 254.
    Edith Stein is honored today not only because of her sainthood but because of what is now seen as important and groundbreaking work in phenomenology done under especially arduous conditions. Thus it may be said with some accuracy that Stein is, among philosophers, in the comparatively rare category of being acknowledged both for her work and her exemplary life. Writing on Stein has standardly proceeded with an emphasis on the biographical factors that caused her to live and write as she (...)
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  35.  8
    Jane Duran (2005). AngloModern: Painting and Modernity in Britain and the United States (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (2):118-120.
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  36.  34
    Jane Duran (2004). Virginia Woolf, Time, and the Real. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):300-308.
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  37.  6
    Jane Duran (2012). Reintroduction of Species. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):137-145.
    The questions surrounding the reintroduction of species, both avian and mammal, to areas in which they were originally found are examined with citation to the literature involving actual attempts at reintroduction, and lines of argument brought to bear on the discussion by ethicists and ecologists. It is concluded that the dangers surrounding most reintroductions are, if anything, understated, but that deep ecology or preservationist views still support such efforts, if undertaken in sound ways.
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  38.  33
    Jane Duran (2007). The Philosophical Camus. Philosophical Forum 38 (4):365–371.
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  39.  8
    Jane Duran (1999). The Moral Status of the Joshua Tree. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (1):113-120.
    The notion that plants, as well as animals, have a moral status is examined both in general, and with respect to the status of particularly rare plants that may be deemed to be lacking in general instrumentality, such as the Joshua tree. The work of Passmore, Singer and Santos is adduced, and several lines of argument revolving around preservation, sentiency and attractiveness to humans are constructed.
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  40.  16
    Jane Duran (1986). Intentionality and Epistemology. The Monist 69 (4):620-626.
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  41.  24
    Jane Duran (2007). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, And: Anne Conway: A Woman Philosopher (Review). Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):200-204.
  42.  4
    Jane Duran (2014). Mono Lake. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):267-276.
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  43.  7
    Jane Duran (1992). Assisted Performance. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):19-23.
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  44.  15
    Jane Duran (1988). Causal Reference and Epistemic Justification. Philosophy of Science 55 (2):272-279.
    The current project of "naturalizing" epistemology has left epistemologists with a plethora of theories alleged to fall under that rubric. Recent epistemic justification theorists have seemed to want to focus on theories of epistemic justification that are more contextualized (naturalized) and less normatively global than those of the past. This paper has two central arguments: (i) that if justification is seen from a naturalized standpoint, more attention to the actual process of epistemic justification might be in order (and, hence, that (...)
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  45.  28
    Jane Duran (2009). Education and Feminist Aesthetics: Gauguin and the Exotic. Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (4):pp. 88-95.
  46.  13
    Jane Duran (1994). Social Epistemology and Goffmanian Theory. Journal of Philosophical Research 19:185-192.
    The notion that epistemoIogy can be naturalized by advertence to areas of the sociaI sciences other than psychoIogy---by employment of sociolinguistics, for exampIe---is supported by three lines of argument. The first asks us to note that sociolinguistics provides information that wouId heIp us delineate the constraints of the process of epistemic justification as engaged in by a speaker/listener. The second asks us to take into account the socioIogy of Ianguage w ork of Erving Goffman, who has written extensiveIy on “face-saving” (...)
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  47.  25
    Jane Duran (2004). Hume on the Gentler Sex. Philosophia 31 (3-4):487-500.
  48.  15
    Jane Duran (2003). Aesthetics, Epistemics, and Feminist Theory. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (1):32-39.
  49.  17
    Jane Duran (1987). Russell on Names. Philosophy Research Archives 13:463-470.
    In this paper I describe a shift in Russell’s views on names from the time of “The Philosophy of Logical Atomism” to An Inquiry into Meaning and Truth. It is the burden of the paper that the shift arose because Russell saw an ontological and epistemological problem created by his previous account of names, and because he then tried to correct it, while simultaneously endeavoring to establish an account consistent with science. Two lines of argument are employed to support this (...)
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  50.  11
    Jane Duran & Ruth Doell (1993). Naturalized Epistemology, Connectionism and Biology. Dialectica 47 (4):327-336.
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