Search results for 'Jane Gaines' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jane Gaines (ed.) (1989/1992). Classical Hollywood Narrative: The Paradigm Wars. Duke University Press.score: 240.0
    Significantly expanded from a special issue ofSouth Atlantic Quarterly(Spring 1989), these essays confront the extent to which formalism has continued to ...
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  2. Jane Gaines (1995). Feminist Heterosexuality and Its Politically Incorrect Pleasures. Critical Inquiry 21 (2):382.score: 240.0
  3. Ignacio Jané (2006). What is Tarski's Common Concept of Consequence? Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (1):1-42.score: 30.0
    In 1936 Tarski sketched a rigorous definition of the concept of logical consequence which, he claimed, agreed quite well with common usage-or, as he also said, with the common concept of consequence. Commentators of Tarski's paper have usually been elusive as to what this common concept is. However, being clear on this issue is important to decide whether Tarski's definition failed (as Etchemendy has contended) or succeeded (as most commentators maintain). I argue that the common concept of consequence that Tarski (...)
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  4. Ignacio Jané & Gabriel Uzquiano (2004). Well- and Non-Well-Founded Fregean Extensions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (5):437-465.score: 30.0
    George Boolos has described an interpretation of a fragment of ZFC in a consistent second-order theory whose only axiom is a modification of Frege's inconsistent Axiom V. We build on Boolos's interpretation and study the models of a variety of such theories obtained by amending Axiom V in the spirit of a limitation of size principle. After providing a complete structural description of all well-founded models, we turn to the non-well-founded ones. We show how to build models in which foundation (...)
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  5. Ignacio Jané (2005). Review of C. Badesa, The Birth of Model Theory: Löwenheim's Theorem in the Frame of the Theory of Relatives. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 13 (1):91-106.score: 30.0
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  6. Hans Joas, Jeremy Gaines & Paul Keast (1998). The Creativity of Action. Sociological Theory 16 (3):282.score: 30.0
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  7. Ignagio Jane (2001). Reflections on Skolem's Relativity of Set-Theoretical Concepts. Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):129-153.score: 30.0
    In this paper an attempt is made to present Skolem's argument, for the relativity of some set-theoretical notions as a sensible one. Skolem's critique of set theory is seen as part of a larger argument to the effect that no conclusive evidence has been given for the existence of uncountable sets. Some replies to Skolem are discussed and are shown not to affect Skolem's position, since they all presuppose the existence of uncountable sets. The paper ends with an assessment of (...)
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  8. K. Jane (1994). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (2).score: 30.0
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  9. Ignacio Jané (1995). The Role of the Absolute Infinite in Cantor's Conception of Set. Erkenntnis 42 (3):375 - 402.score: 20.0
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  10. Ignasi Jané (2010). Idealist and Realist Elements in Cantor's Approach to Set Theory. Philosophia Mathematica 18 (2):193-226.score: 20.0
    There is an apparent tension between the open-ended aspect of the ordinal sequence and the assumption that the set-theoretical universe is fully determinate. This tension is already present in Cantor, who stressed the incompletable character of the transfinite number sequence in Grundlagen and avowed the definiteness of the totality of sets and numbers in subsequent philosophical publications and in correspondence. The tension is particularly discernible in his late distinction between sets and inconsistent multiplicities. I discuss Cantor’s contrasting views, and I (...)
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  11. S. Chow Wing, P. Wu Jane & K. K. Chan Allan (2009). The Effects of Environmental Factors on the Behavior of Chinese Managers in the Information Age in China. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4).score: 20.0
    This paper examines the effects of environmental factors on the ethical behavior of managers using computers at work in Mainland China. In this study, environmental factors refer to senior management, peer groups, company policies, professional practices, and legal considerations. Ethical behaviors include attitudes to disclosure, protection of privacy, conflict of interest, personal conduct, social responsibility, and integrity. A questionnaire survey was used for data collection, and 125 mainland Chinese managers participated in the study. The results show that peer groups, professional (...)
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  12. Ignacio Jané (2003). Remarks on Second-Order Consequence. Theoria 18 (2):179-187.score: 20.0
    Tarski’s definition of logical consequence can take different forms when implemented in second order languages, depending on what counts as a model. In the canonical, or standard, version, a model is just an ordinary structure and the (monadic) second-order variables are meant to range over all subsets of its domain. We discuss the dependence of canonical second-order consequence on set theory and raise doubts on the assumption that canonical consequence is a definite relation.
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  13. Ignacio Jane (1997). Theoremhood and Logical Consequence. Theoria 12 (1):139-160.score: 20.0
    In this paper, Tarskis notion of Logical Consequence is viewed as a special case of the more general notion of being a theorem of an axiomatic theory. As was recognized by Tarski, the material adequacy of his definition depends on having the distinction between logical and non logical constants right, but we find Tarskis analysis persuasive even if we dont agree on what constants are logical. This accords with the view put forward in this paper that Tarski indeed captures the (...)
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  14. I. Jane & G. Uzquiano (2004). Well-and Non-Well-Founded Fregean Extensions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (5):437--465.score: 20.0
    George Boolos has described an interpretation of a fragment of ZFC in a consistent second-order theory whose only axiom is a modification of Frege's inconsistent Axiom V. We build on Boolos's interpretation and study the models of a variety of such theories obtained by amending Axiom V in the spirit of a limitation of size principle. After providing a complete structural description of all well-founded models, we turn to the non-well-founded ones. We show how to build models in which foundation (...)
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  15. Brian R. Gaines (2009). Designing Visual Languages for Description Logics. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 18 (2):217-250.score: 20.0
    Semantic networks were developed in cognitive science and artificial intelligence studies as graphical knowledge representation and inference tools emulating human thought processes. Formal analysis of the representation and inference capabilities of the networks modeled them as subsets of standard first-order logic (FOL), restricted in the operations allowed in order to ensure the tractability that seemed to characterize human reasoning capabilities. The graphical network representations were modeled as providing a visual language for the logic. Sub-sets of FOL targeted on knowledge representation (...)
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  16. Ignacio Jané (1988). Lógica Y Ontología. Theoria 4 (1):81-106.score: 20.0
    In this paper we discuss the way logical consequence depends on what sets there are. We try to find out what set-theoretical assumptions have to be made to determine a logic, i.e., to give a definite answer to whether any given argument is correct. Consideration of second order logic -which is left highly indetermined by the usual set-theoretical axioms- prompts us to suggest a slightly different but natural nation of logical consequence, which reduces second order logic indeterminacy without interfering with (...)
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  17. Judy D. Whipps (2004). Jane Addams's Social Thought as a Model for a Pragmatist-Feminist Communitarianism. Hypatia 19 (2):118-133.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that communitarian philosophy can be an important philosophic resource for feminist thinkers, particularly when considered in the light of Jane Addams's (1860-1935) feminist-pragmatism. Addams's communitarianism requires progressive change as well as a moral duty to seek out diverse voices. Contrary to some contemporary communitarians, Addams extends her concept of community to include interdependent global communities, such as the global community of women peace workers.
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  18. Charles R. Pigden (2012). A 'Sensible Knave'? Hume, Jane Austen and Mr Elliot. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):465-480.score: 18.0
    This paper deals with what I take to be one woman’s literary response to a philosophical problem. The woman is Jane Austen, the problem is the rationality of Hume’s ‘sensible knave’, and Austen’s response is to deepen the problem. Despite his enthusiasm for virtue, Hume reluctantly concedes in the EPM that injustice can be a rational strategy for ‘sensible knaves’, intelligent but selfish agents who feel no aversion towards thoughts of villainy or baseness. Austen agrees, but adds that ABSENT (...)
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  19. Inmaculada Cobos Fernández (2001). A Journey to Madness: Jane Bowles's Narrative and Schizophrenia. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (4):265-283.score: 18.0
    This work is a study of Jane Bowles's madness as revealed through several of her literary works and her life story. On a parallel plane, it is an epistemological exploration of the points of intersection between humanistic psychoanalysis and deconstructive literary criticism. Here we consider the schizoid traits in Two Serious Ladies (1943) and in “Camp Cataract” (1949), using the theories developed in this area by the psychiatrist R. D. Laing (1927–1989).
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  20. Alan Van Wyk (2012). What Matters Now? Review of Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 8 (2):130-136.score: 18.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-US; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} Review of Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things.
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  21. James Lindemann Nelson (2014). Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.score: 18.0
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on (...)
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  22. Michael McKenna, Ultimacy and Sweet Jane.score: 12.0
    Some people, they like to go out dancing And other peoples, they have to work And there’s even some evil mothers Well they’re gonna tell you that everything is just dirt You know, that women, never really faint And that villains always blink their eyes And that, children are the only ones who really blush And that, life is just to die. And, everyone who had a heart, They wouldn’t turn around and break it And that everyone who played a (...)
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  23. Leonard J. Waks & Jane Roland Martin (2007). Encounter: The Educational Metamorphoses of Jane Roland Martin. Education and Culture 23 (1):73-83.score: 12.0
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  24. Peter Gratton, Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Levi Bryant & Paul Ennis (2010). Interviews: Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant and Paul Ennis. Speculations 1 (1):84-134.score: 12.0
    The context for these interviews was a seminar [Peter Gratton] conducted on speculative realism in the Spring 2010. There has been great interest in speculative realism and one reason Gratton surmise[s] is not just the arguments offered, though [Gratton doesn't] want to take away from them; each of these scholars are vivid writers and great pedagogues, many of whom are in constant contact with their readers via their weblogs. Thus these interviews provided an opportunity to forward student questions about their (...)
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  25. Beth Eddy (2010). Struggle or Mutual Aid: Jane Addams, Petr Kropotkin, and the Progressive Encounter with Social Darwinism. The Pluralist 5 (1):21-43.score: 12.0
    The year is 1901. Two minor celebrities from opposite corners of the globe share an evening meal in Chicago. Both are politically left-leaning, both are evolutionists of a sort, both are concerned with the plight of the poor in the face of the escalation of the Industrial Revolution. The Russian man has been giving a series of lectures to the people of Chicago; he is staying at the American woman's settlement house-Hull House. They are Jane Addams, Chicago's activist social (...)
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  26. E. M. Dadlez (2008). Form Affects Content: Reading Jane Austen. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 315-329.score: 12.0
    What does it mean to hold that the significant aspects of a literary passage cannot be captured in a paraphrase? Does a change in the description of an act "risk producing a different act" from the one described? Using Jane Austen as an example, we'll consider whether her use of metaphor and symbol really amounts to calling someone a prick, whether her narrative voice changes what it is that is expressed, and whether comedy can hold just as much (...)
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  27. Paul Kidder (2008). The Urbanist Ethics of Jane Jacobs. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):253 – 266.score: 12.0
    This article examines ethical themes in the works of the celebrated writer on urban affairs, Jane Jacobs. Jacobs' early works on cities develop an implicit, 'ecological' conception of the human good, one that connects it closely with economic and political goals while emphasizing the intrinsic good of the community formed in pursuit of those goals. Later works develop an explicit ethics, arguing that governing and trading require two different schemes of values and virtues. While Jacobs intended this ethics to (...)
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  28. Jennifer Bajorek (2011). Jane Alexander's Anti-Anthropomorphic Photographs. Angelaki 16 (1):79 - 96.score: 12.0
    This essay sets out from a reading of two photomontage projects by South African artist Jane Alexander, ?Adventure Centre? (2000) and ?Survey: Cape of Good Hope? (2005?09), one of Alexander's ongoing ?survey? projects, and remarks on the overwhelming impulse on the part of critics and interpreters to anthropomorphize the figures appearing in the photomontage images. It goes on to explore the hypothesis that Alexander's work in fact resists or refuses these attempts at anthropomorphization, and that this resistance is connected (...)
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  29. Mathew A. Foust (2008). Perplexities of Filiality: Confucius and Jane Addams on the Private/Public Distinction. Asian Philosophy 18 (2):149 – 166.score: 12.0
    This article compares the ways in which the classic Western philosophical division between the private and public spheres is challenged by an apparently disparate pair of thinkers—Confucius and Jane Addams. It is argued that insofar as the public and private distinction is that between the sphere of the family and that outside of the family, Confucius and Addams offer ways of rethinking that distinction. While Confucius endorses a porous relation between these realms, Addams advocates a relation that fosters reconstructive (...)
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  30. Charlene Haddock Seigfried (1999). Socializing Democracy: Jane Addams and John Dewey. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (2):207-230.score: 12.0
    The author argues that the contributions of Jane Addams and the women of theHull House Settlement to pragmatist theory, particularly as formulated by JohnDewey, are largely responsible for its emancipatory emphasis. By recoveringAddams's own pragmatist theory, a version of pragmatist feminism is developedthat speaks to such contemporary feminist issues as the manner of inclusionin society of diverse persons, marginalized by gender, ethnicity, race, andsexual orientation; the strengths and limitations of standpoint theory; and theneed for feminist ethics to embrace the (...)
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  31. Elizabeth F. Loftus, Who Abused Jane Doe?score: 12.0
    Case histories make contributions to science and practice, but they can also be highly misleading. We illustrate with our reexamination of the case of Jane Doe; she was videotaped twice, once when she was six years old and then eleven years later when she was seventeen. During the first interview she reported sexual abuse by her mother. During the second interview she apparently forgot and then remembered the sexual abuse. Jane's case has been hailed by some as the (...)
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  32. John Pettegrew (2012). The Religion of Democracy in Wartime: Jane Addams, Pragmatism, and the Appeal of Horizontal Mysticism. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 33 (3):224-244.score: 12.0
    The doctrine of Democracy, like any other of the living faiths of men, is so essentially mystical that it continually demands new formulation. In a 1914 report to the General Federation of Women’s Clubs, Jane Addams remembered how Chicago’s clubs came together two decades earlier around social issues that had been in the air for some time but which took on sudden immediacy amidst the women’s new collective “feeling and thought” and, with that key happening, called the groups to (...)
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  33. Maurice Hamington (ed.) (2010). Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 12.0
    "A collection of articles that address Jane Addams (1860-1935) in terms of her contribution to feminist philosophy and theory through her work on culture, art, ...
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  34. Justen Infinito (2003). Jane Elliot Meets Foucault: The Formation of Ethical Identities in the Classroom. Journal of Moral Education 32 (1):67-76.score: 12.0
    This article looks at the popular, yet controversial, pedagogical exercise originated by Jane Elliot in the early 1970s. The "Blue-Eyed, Brown-Eyed" activity is analysed as a possible tool of moral education utilising Michel Foucault's theories of ethical self-formation and care of the self . By first explicating Foucault's ethics, the author reveals how the exercise, as practised in the post-secondary classroom, can be considered part of the "technologies of the self" advocated by Foucault that are integral to the process (...)
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  35. Judy Dee Whipps (2004). Jane Addams's Social Thought as a Model for a Pragmatist-Feminist Communitarianism. Hypatia 19 (2):118 - 133.score: 12.0
    This paper argues that communitarian philosophy can be an important philosophic resource for feminist thinkers, particularly when considered in the light of Jane Addams's (1860-1935) feminist-pragmatism. Addams's communitarianism requires progressive change as well as a moral duty to seek out diverse voices. Contrary to some contemporary communitarians, Addams extends her concept of community to include interdependent global communities, such as the global community of women peace workers.
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  36. James Campbell (2011). The Social Philosophy of Jane Addams. Maurice Hamington. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (3):352-356.score: 12.0
    This welcome volume offers a rich presentation of the ideas of Jane Addams (1860–1935), with emphases upon her contributions to the Pragmatic movement. It is divided into two parts. Chapters 1–4 “provide a historical and theoretical foundation for Addams’s social philosophy,” and chapters 5–9 “discuss how Addams applied her social theories to a variety of social issues” (p. 11) including pacifism, race and diversity, socialism, education broadly conceived, and religion. There is also an introduction, an afterword, and an extensive (...)
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  37. A. Upfal (2005). Jane Austen's Lifelong Health Problems and Final Illness: New Evidence Points to a Fatal Hodgkin's Disease and Excludes the Widely Accepted Addison's. Medical Humanities 31 (1):3-11.score: 12.0
    Next SectionJane Austen is typically described as having excellent health until the age of 40 and the onset of a mysterious and fatal illness, initially identified by Sir Zachary Cope in 1964 as Addison’s disease. Her biographers, deceived both by Cassandra Austen’s destruction of letters containing medical detail, and the cheerful high spirits of the existing letters, have seriously underestimated the extent to which illness affected Austen’s life. A medical history reveals that she was particularly susceptible to infection, and suffered (...)
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  38. M. Regina Leffers (1993). Pragmatists Jane Addams and John Dewey Inform the Ethic of Care. Hypatia 8 (2):64 - 77.score: 12.0
    Both Jane Addams and John Dewey see human beings as ultimately creative in nature and as radically connected to each other. In this paper I look to these ideas to provide a theoretical model that is able to explain why we are able to extend our care to others outside of our intimate circle of family and friends, and to show us how we can purposefully move to the next higher level of moral reasoning.
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  39. Matthew Lockard (2013). Implication and Reasoning in Mental State Attribution: Comments on Jane Heal's Theory of Co-Cognition. Philosophical Psychology (5):1-16.score: 12.0
    Implication and reasoning in mental state attribution: Comments on Jane Heal's theory of co-cognition. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2012.730040.
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  40. Louise W. Knight (2010). Love on Halsted Street : A Contemplation on Jane Addams. In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press. 181.score: 12.0
  41. Wendy Sarvasy (2010). Engendering Democracy by Socializing It : Jane Addams's Contribution to Feminist Political Theorizing. In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press. 293.score: 12.0
  42. Charlene Haddock Seigfried (2013). The Social Self in Jane Addams's Prefaces and Introductions. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 49 (2):127-156.score: 12.0
    Despite her busy life as a social activist, Jane Addams still managed to write ten books and over a hundred articles.2 These often had their origins in the many lectures she gave as the primary spokesperson for the Hull House settlement and indefatigable public speaker for social reform. When she organized these lectures for publication, often adding new material or rearranging old content, her prefaces and introductions allowed her to explain to the reader her intentions in doing so and (...)
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  43. K. G. White (2009). Jane Austen and Addison's Disease: An Unconvincing Diagnosis. Medical Humanities 35 (2):98-100.score: 12.0
    Jane Austen’s letters describe a two-year deterioration into bed-ridden exhaustion, with unusual colouring, bilious attacks and rheumatic pains. In 1964, Zachary Cope postulated tubercular Addison’s to explain her symptoms and her relatively pain-free illness. Literary scholars later countered this posthumous diagnosis on grounds that are not well substantiated, while medical authors supported his conclusion. Important symptoms reported by contemporary Addison’s patients—mental confusion, generalised pain and suffering, weight loss and anorexia—are absent from Jane Austen’s letters. Thus, by listening to (...)
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  44. Maria Walsh (2004). Lost in Space, on Jane and Louise Wilson , with Essays by Jeremy Millar and Claire Doherty. Film-Philosophy 8 (2).score: 12.0
    _Jane and Louise Wilson_ With Essays by Jeremy Millar and Claire Doherty London: Ellipsis, 2000 ISBN 1-84166-027-2 84 pp., inc. 120 b/w photograph.
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  45. Jane Austen (1994). Jane Austen:Austen Soc 19 Vols. Routledge.score: 12.0
    First published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  46. Victoria Bissell Brown (2010). Sex and the City: Jane Addams Confronts Prostitution. In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 12.0
  47. Judith M. Green (2010). Social Democracy, Cosmopolitan Hospitality, and Intercivilizational Peace : Lessons From Jane Addams. In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 12.0
  48. Stephen Nathan Haymes (2006). American Educational Studies Association, 2005 George Kneller Lecture: Second Generation Memory and the Phenomenological Structure of Intergenerational Remembrance in Ernest Gaines's Fictional Life-World. Educational Studies 40 (3):226-245.score: 12.0
    (2006). American Educational Studies Association, 2005 George Kneller Lecture: Second Generation Memory and the Phenomenological Structure of Intergenerational Remembrance in Ernest Gaines's Fictional Life-World. Educational Studies: Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 226-245.
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  49. Shannon Jackson (2010). Toward a Queer Social Welfare Studies : Unsettling Jane Addams. In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press. 159.score: 12.0
  50. Katherine Joslin (2010). Reading Jane Addams in the Twenty-First Century. In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press. 31--53.score: 12.0
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