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Profile: Jane Geaney (University of Richmond)
  1. Jane Geaney (2010). Grounding "Language" in the Senses: What the Eyes and Ears Reveal About Ming 名 (Names) in Early Chinese Texts. Philosophy East and West 60 (2):pp. 251-293.
    For understanding early Chinese "theories of language" and views about the relation of speech to a nonalphabetic script, a thorough analysis of early Chinese metalinguistic terminology is necessary. This article analyzes the function of ming & (name) in early Chinese texts as a first step in that direction. It argues against the regular treatment of this term in early Chinese texts as the equivalent of "word." It examines ming in light of early Chinese ideas about sense perception, the mythology about (...)
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  2. Jane Geaney (2004). Guarding Moral Boundaries: Shame in Early Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 54 (2):113-142.
    : In response to allegations that China is a "shame culture," scholars of Confucian ethics have made use of new studies in psychology, anthropology, and philosophy that present shame in a more favorable light. These studies contend that shame involves internalization of social moral codes. By adapting these new internal models of shame, Confucian ethicists have attempted to rehabilitate the emphasis on shame in early Confucianism, but in doing so they have inadvertently highlighted the striking absence in early Confucian texts (...)
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  3. Jane Geaney (2000). Chinese Cosmology and Recent Studies in Confucian Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):449 - 470.
    Scholars of early Chinese philosophy frequently point to the nontranscendent, organismic conception of the cosmos in early China as the source of China's unique perspective and distinctive values. One would expect recent works in Confucian ethics to capitalize on this idea. Reviewing recent works in Confucian ethics by P. J. Ivanhoe, David Nivison, R. P. Peerenboom, Henry Rosemont, and Tu Wei-Ming, the author analyzes these new studies in terms of the extent to which their representation of Confucian ethics reflects and (...)
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  4. Jane Geaney (1999). A Critique of A.C. Graham's Reconstruction of the "Neo-Mohist Canons&Quot;. Journal of the American Oriental Society 19 (1):1-11.
    A. C. Graham's Later Mohist Logic, Ethics, and Sciences (1978) is the only Western-language translation of the obscure and textually corrupt chapters of the Mozi that purportedly constitute the foundations of ancient Chinese logic. Graham's presentation and interpretation of this difficult material has been largely accepted by scholars. This article questions the soundness of Graham's reconstruction of these chapters (the so-called "Neo-Mohist Canons"). Upon close examination, problems are revealed in both the structure and the content of the framework Graham uses (...)
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  5. Jane Geaney (1999). Associate Professor of Religion. Journal of the American Oriental Society 19 (1):1-11.
    A. C. Graham's Later Mohist Logic, Ethics, and Sciences (1978) is the only Western-language translation of the obscure and textually corrupt chapters of the Mozi that purportedly constitute the foundations of ancient Chinese logic. Graham's presentation and interpretation of this difficult material has been largely accepted by scholars. This article questions the soundness of Graham's reconstruction of these chapters (the so-called "Neo-Mohist Canons"). Upon close examination, problems are revealed in both the structure and the content of the framework Graham uses (...)
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