Search results for 'Jane Hope' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jane Hope (1998). Introducing Buddha. Totem Books.score: 120.0
     
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  2. Paul Brazier (2008). Mary: Grace and Hope in Christ; the Text with Commentaries and Study Guide. By Donald Bolen and Gregory Cameron (Editors)Mary for Time and Eternity: Essays on Mary and Ecumenism. By William McLoughlin and Jill Pinnock (Editors)Mary: The Complete Resource. By Sarah Jane Boss (Editor). [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 49 (2):357–360.score: 36.0
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  3. Karen Baker-Fletcher (2007). Ecohopes : Enactments, Poetics, Liturgics. Ethics and Ecology : A priMary Challenge of the Dialogue of Civilizations / Mary Evelyn Tucker ; Religion and the Earth on the Ground : The Experience of Greenfaith in New Jersey / Fletcher Harper ; Cries of Creation, Ground for Hope : Faith, Justice, and the Earth Interfaith Worship Service / Jane Ellen Nickell and Lawrence Troster ; the Firm Ground for Hope : A Ritual for Planting Humans and Trees / Heather Murray Elkins, with Assistance From David Wood ; Musings From White Rock Lake : Poems. In Laurel Kearns & Catherine Keller (eds.), Ecospirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth. Fordham University Press.score: 36.0
  4. Jennifer Bajorek (2011). Jane Alexander's Anti-Anthropomorphic Photographs. Angelaki 16 (1):79 - 96.score: 21.0
    This essay sets out from a reading of two photomontage projects by South African artist Jane Alexander, ?Adventure Centre? (2000) and ?Survey: Cape of Good Hope? (2005?09), one of Alexander's ongoing ?survey? projects, and remarks on the overwhelming impulse on the part of critics and interpreters to anthropomorphize the figures appearing in the photomontage images. It goes on to explore the hypothesis that Alexander's work in fact resists or refuses these attempts at anthropomorphization, and that this resistance is (...)
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  5. James Campbell (2011). The Social Philosophy of Jane Addams. Maurice Hamington. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (3):352-356.score: 21.0
    This welcome volume offers a rich presentation of the ideas of Jane Addams (1860–1935), with emphases upon her contributions to the Pragmatic movement. It is divided into two parts. Chapters 1–4 “provide a historical and theoretical foundation for Addams’s social philosophy,” and chapters 5–9 “discuss how Addams applied her social theories to a variety of social issues” (p. 11) including pacifism, race and diversity, socialism, education broadly conceived, and religion. There is also an introduction, an afterword, and an extensive (...)
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  6. Andrew Chignell (2013). Rational Hope, Moral Order, and the Revolution of the Will. In Eric Watkins (ed.), Divine Order, Human Order, and the Order of Nature.score: 18.0
    In this paper I sketch out one of the most important conditions on rational hope, and argue that Kant embraced a version of it. I go on to suggest that we can use this analysis to solve a longstanding 'conundrum' in Kant's ethics and religion regarding the nature of the individual moral revolution. -/- .
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  7. Lisa Kretz (2013). Hope in Environmental Philosophy. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):925-944.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT. Ecological philosophy requires a significant orientation to the role of hope in both theory and practice. I trace the limited presence of hope in ecological philosophy, and outline reasons why environmental hopelessness is a threat. I articulate and problematize recent environmental publications on the topic of hope, the most important worry being that current literature fails to provide the necessary psychological grounding for hopeful action. I turn to the psychology of hope to provide direction for (...)
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  8. Judy D. Whipps (2004). Jane Addams's Social Thought as a Model for a Pragmatist-Feminist Communitarianism. Hypatia 19 (2):118-133.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that communitarian philosophy can be an important philosophic resource for feminist thinkers, particularly when considered in the light of Jane Addams's (1860-1935) feminist-pragmatism. Addams's communitarianism requires progressive change as well as a moral duty to seek out diverse voices. Contrary to some contemporary communitarians, Addams extends her concept of community to include interdependent global communities, such as the global community of women peace workers.
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  9. Allen Thompson (2010). Radical Hope for Living Well in a Warmer World. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1):43-55.score: 18.0
    Environmental changes can bear upon the environmental virtues, having effects not only on the conditions of their application but also altering the concepts themselves. I argue that impending radical changes in global climate will likely precipitate significant changes in the dominate world culture of consumerism and then consider how these changes could alter the moral landscape, particularly culturally thick conceptions of the environmental virtues. According to Jonathan Lear, as the last principal chief of the Crow Nation, Plenty Coups exhibited the (...)
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  10. Matthew Ratcliffe (2013). What is It to Lose Hope? Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):597-614.score: 18.0
    This paper addresses the phenomenology of hopelessness. I distinguish two broad kinds of predicament that are easily confused: ‘loss of hopes’ and ‘loss of hope’. I argue that not all hope can be characterised as an intentional state of the form ‘I hope that p’. It is possible to lose all hopes of that kind and yet retain another kind of hope. The hope that remains is not an intentional state or a non-intentional bodily feeling. (...)
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  11. Aaron Cooley (2007). Review: Of Westbrook, Democratic Hope: Pragmatism and the Politics of Truth. [REVIEW] Education and Culture 23 (2):pp. 76-79.score: 18.0
    The dormancy of American pragmatism is over. At least, this is what numerous articles and books have unequivocally stated in the decades since Richard Rorty gave up his belief in orthodox analytical epistemology and settled into his own brand of John Dewey's antifoundational epistemology. Even though Rorty's interpretation and manipulation of Dewey have been controversial, we are all the better for the revival of discourse around what pragmatism was, is, and will be. Robert Westbrook's Democratic Hope: Pragmatism and the (...)
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  12. Andrew E. Benjamin (1997). Present Hope: Philosophy, Architecture, Judaism. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Present Hope is a compelling exploration of how we think philosophically about the present. Andrew Benjamin considers examples in philosophy, architecture and poetry to illustrate crucial themes of loss, memory, tragedy, hope and modernity. The book uses the work of Walter Benjamin and Martin Heidegger to illustrate the ways the notion of hope was weaved into their philosophies. Andrew Benjamin maintains that hope is a vital part of the present, rather than an expression only of the (...)
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  13. Patrick Shade (2001). Habits of Hope: A Pragmatic Theory. Vanderbilt University Press.score: 18.0
    Patrick Shade makes a strong argument for the necessity of hope in a cynical world that too often rejects it as foolish. While most accounts of hope situate it in a theological context, Shade presents a theory rooted in the pragmatic thought of such American philosophers as C. S. Peirce, William James, and John Dewey.
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  14. Lynne M. Andersson, Robert A. Giacalone & Carole L. Jurkiewicz (2007). On the Relationship of Hope and Gratitude to Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):401 - 409.score: 18.0
    A longitudinal study of 308 white-collar U.S. employees revealed that feelings of hope and gratitude increase concern for corporate social responsibility (CSR). In particular, employees with stronger hope and gratitude were found to have a greater sense of responsibility toward employee and societal issues; interestingly, employee hope and gratitude did not affect sense of responsibility toward economic and safety/quality issues. These findings offer an extension of research by Giacalone, Paul, and Jurkiewicz (2005, Journal of Business Ethics, (...)
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  15. Charles R. Pigden (2012). A 'Sensible Knave'? Hume, Jane Austen and Mr Elliot. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):465-480.score: 18.0
    This paper deals with what I take to be one woman’s literary response to a philosophical problem. The woman is Jane Austen, the problem is the rationality of Hume’s ‘sensible knave’, and Austen’s response is to deepen the problem. Despite his enthusiasm for virtue, Hume reluctantly concedes in the EPM that injustice can be a rational strategy for ‘sensible knaves’, intelligent but selfish agents who feel no aversion towards thoughts of villainy or baseness. Austen agrees, but adds that ABSENT (...)
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  16. Markku Roinila (2012). Leibniz on Hope. In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. 161.score: 18.0
    G. W. Leibniz famously proclaimed that this is the best of all possible worlds. One of the properties of the best world is its increasing perfection. He gave a prominent role in his discussion of emotions to hope which is related to intellectual activity such as curiosity and courage which again is essential for the practice of science and promoting the common good. Leibniz regarded hope as a process where minute perceptions in the mind, that is, unconscious promises (...)
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  17. Inmaculada Cobos Fernández (2001). A Journey to Madness: Jane Bowles's Narrative and Schizophrenia. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (4):265-283.score: 18.0
    This work is a study of Jane Bowles's madness as revealed through several of her literary works and her life story. On a parallel plane, it is an epistemological exploration of the points of intersection between humanistic psychoanalysis and deconstructive literary criticism. Here we consider the schizoid traits in Two Serious Ladies (1943) and in “Camp Cataract” (1949), using the theories developed in this area by the psychiatrist R. D. Laing (1927–1989).
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  18. Mary Zournazi (2003). Hope: New Philosophies for Change. Routledge.score: 18.0
    How is hope to be found amid the ethical and political dilemmas of modern life? Writer and philosopher Mary Zournazi brought her questions to some of the most thoughtful intellectuals at work today. She discusses "joyful revolt" with Julia Kristeva, the idea of "the rest of the world" with Gayatri Spivak, the "art of living" with Michel Serres, the "carnival of the senses" with Michael Taussig, the relation of hope to passion and to politics with Chantal Mouffe and (...)
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  19. Janette McDonald & Andrea M. Stephenson (eds.) (2010). The Resilience of Hope. Rodopi.score: 18.0
    This book is perfect for anyone wondering where hope fits into our lives during these troubling times.
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  20. Alan Mittleman (2009). Hope in a Democratic Age: Philosophy, Religion, and Political Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    How and why should hope play a key role in a twenty-first century democratic politics? Alan Mittleman offers a philosophical exploration of the theme, contending that a modern construction of hope as an emotion is deficient. He revives the medieval understanding of hope as a virtue, reconstructing this in a contemporary philosophical idiom. In this framework, hope is less a spontaneous reaction than it is a choice against despair; a decision to live with confidence and expectation, (...)
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  21. Alan Van Wyk (2012). What Matters Now? Review of Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 8 (2):130-136.score: 18.0
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  22. Adam Kadlac (forthcoming). The Virtue of Hope. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.score: 18.0
    I argue that hope is a virtue insofar as it (1) leads to a more realistic view of the future than dispositions like optimism and pessimism, (2) promotes courage, and (3) encourages an important kind of solidarity with others. In light of this proposal, I consider the relationship between hope and our beliefs about what is good as well as the conditions under which hope may fail to be a virtue.
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  23. Jack Coulehan (2011). Deep Hope: A Song Without Words. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):143-160.score: 18.0
    Hope helps alleviate suffering. In the case of terminal illness, recent experience in palliative medicine has taught physicians that hope is durable and often thrives even in the face of imminent death. In this article, I examine the perspectives of philosophers, theologians, psychologists, clinicians, neuroscientists, and poets, and provide a series of observations, connections, and gestures about hope, particularly about what I call “deep hope.” I end with some proposals about how such hope can be (...)
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  24. Robert H. Schwartz & Frederick R. Post (2002). The Unexplored Potential of Hope to Level the Playing Field: A Multilevel Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (2):135 - 143.score: 18.0
    A multilevel view of social change is presented in which socially responsible organizations, society, and high-hope individuals interact in support of hopefulness – thereby leveling the playing field. Suggestions are made about future research and the roles of organizations and society in eliciting hope in organizational and societal cultures.
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  25. David Halpin (2001). The Nature of Hope and Its Significance for Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 49 (4):392 - 410.score: 18.0
    This paper offers an analysis of the nature of hope and explicates its significance for and relation to education. This entails distinguishing initially two kinds of hope - absolute and ultimate hope. While absolute hope is an orientation of the spirit which sets no conditions or limits on what is achievable and has no particular ends in view, ultimate hope is an 'aimed hope', that is to say a (...)
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  26. James Lindemann Nelson (2014). Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.score: 18.0
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on (...)
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  27. Craig Oster & Francesco Pagnini (2012). Resentment, Hate, and Hope in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal and progressive neurodegenerative disease. Despite much research having been conducted about psychological issues involved in living with ALS, anger and resentment have yet to be investigated. Moreover, the construct of “hope” has received little attention, so far. An online survey was created to investigate hate, resentment and hope issues in people with ALS, in relation to the willingness to adopt a strict nutrient dense diet if it were shown to increase longevity. (...)
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  28. Jayne M. Waterworth (2003). A Philosophical Analysis of Hope. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 18.0
    Despite the familiarity of hope in human experience, it is a phenomenon infrequently considered from a philosophical point of view. This book charts the centrality of hope in thought and action from first, second and third person perspectives. From everyday situations to extreme circumstances of trail and endings in life, the contours of hope are given a phenomenological description and subjected to conceptual analysis. This consistently secular account of hope sheds a different light on questions of (...)
     
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  29. Simon Woods, Lynn E. Hagger & Pauline McCormack (2012). Therapeutic Misconception: Hope, Trust and Misconception in Paediatric Research. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis (1):1-19.score: 16.0
    Although the therapeutic misconception (TM) has been well described over a period of approximately 20 years, there has been disagreement about its implications for informed consent to research. In this paper we review some of the history and debate over the ethical implications of TM but also bring a new perspective to those debates. Drawing upon our experience of working in the context of translational research for rare childhood diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we consider the ethical and legal (...)
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  30. Bernard N. Schumacher (2003). A Philosophy of Hope: Josef Pieper and the Contemporary Debate on Hope. Fordham University Press.score: 15.0
    A leading Catholic philosopher, he won a wide audience through such books as The Four Cardinal Virtues and About Love.This book is one of few extended studies ...
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  31. Rebecca Kathleen Huskey (2010). Paul Ricoeur on Hope: Expecting the Good. Peter Lang.score: 15.0
    In order to examine fully the nature of human beings, Paul Ricoeur crossed disciplinary boundaries in his work, moving from phenomenology to social and ...
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  32. Erich Fromm (1968/2010). The Revolution of Hope. New York, Harper & Row.score: 15.0
    Publisher's Foreword As the present book is reissued, The American Mental Health Foundation celebrates its 86th anniversary. Organized in 1924, AMHF is ...
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  33. David T. Ozar (2008). Forgiving and Hoping. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:163-172.score: 15.0
    The word “forgiveness” and its verbal form, “forgiving,” may appear to have one and the same meaning whenever it is used. But the first thesis of this essay is that several distinct kinds of human activity are denominated by this word, and their differences are philosophically important. The second thesis of this essay is that some of the human activities denominated by this word have a close connection with hope, more specifically with hoping-in-a-person. The third thesis of this essay (...)
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  34. David Katerndahl (forthcoming). Bifurcating Effects of Hope and Support in Short- and Long-Term Health Outcomes Among Primary Care Patients Without Mental Illness. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice:n/a-n/a.score: 15.0
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  35. Darren Webb (2013). Pedagogies of Hope. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):397-414.score: 15.0
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  36. Jeffrey Bloechl, David L. Smith & Daniel J. Martino (eds.) (2004). The Phenomenology of Hope: The Twenty-First Annual Symposium of the Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center: Lectures. Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center, Duquesne University-Gumberg Library.score: 15.0
     
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  37. Ernst Bloch (1986). The Principle of Hope. Mit Press.score: 15.0
     
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  38. Patricia Bruininks & Bertram F. Malle (2006). Distinguishing Hope From Optimism and Related Affective States. Motivation and Emotion 29 (4):324--352.score: 15.0
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  39. Steven A. Carr (1990). Celebrate Life: Hope for a Culture Preoccupied with Death. Wolgemuth & Hyatt.score: 15.0
     
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  40. Michael Gelven (2001). Judging Hope: A Reach to the True and the False. St. Augustine's Press.score: 15.0
     
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  41. Joseph J. Godfrey (1987). A Philosophy of Human Hope. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 15.0
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  42. Janet Horrigan & Ed Wiltse (eds.) (2010). Hope Against Hope: Philosophies, Cultures and Politics of Possibility and Doubt. Rodopi.score: 15.0
     
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  43. Ijuka Kabumba (2001). On Hope, and Other Essays. Nyonyi Pub. Co. Ltd..score: 15.0
     
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  44. William F. Lynch (1974). Images of Hope. Notre Dame [Ind.]University of Notre Dame Press.score: 15.0
     
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  45. William F. Lynch (1965). Images of Hope. Baltimore, Helicon.score: 15.0
     
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  46. Ovey N. Mohammed (ed.) (1999). Giving an Account of Our Hope: Religious Foundations for Hope Facing a New Millenium. Campion College.score: 15.0
     
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  47. Jürgen Moltmann (2012). Ethics of Hope. Fortress Press.score: 15.0
    Part 1. Eschatology and ethics. Introduction -- Apocalyptic eschatology -- Christological eschatology -- Separatist eschatology -- Transformative eschatology -- Part 2. An ethics of life. A culture of life -- Medical ethics -- Part 3. Earth ethics. In the space of the earth, what is the earth? -- The time of the earth -- Ecology -- Earth ethics -- Part 4. Ethics of just peace. Criteria for forming a judgment -- Divine and human righteousness and justice -- Dragon slaying and (...)
     
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  48. James L. Muyskens (1979). The Sufficiency of Hope: The Conceptual Foundations of Religion. Temple University Press.score: 15.0
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  49. David G. Myers (1980). The Inflated Self: Human Illusions and the Biblical Call to Hope. Seabury Press.score: 15.0
     
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  50. Jens C. Thimm, Arne Holte, Tim Brennen & Catharina E. A. Wang (2013). Hope and Expectancies for Future Events in Depression. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
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