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  1. Jane Maienschein (forthcoming). Part II-What's in a Name: Embryos, Clones, and Stem Cells. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):12-30.
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  2. Jane Maienschein (2014). A Surgeon's View of Transplantation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 46:104-106.
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  3. Jane Maienschein (2013). Understanding Embryos in a Changing and Complex World: A Case of Philosophers and Historians Engaging Society. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis:1-19.
    The case of embryo research provides insight into the challenges for historians and philosophers of science who want to engage social issues, and even more challenges in engaging society. Yet there are opportunities in doing so. History and philosophy of science research demonstrates that the public impression of embryos does not fit with our scientific understanding. In cases where there are competing understandings of the phenomena and public impacts, we have to negotiate social responses. Historians and philosophers of science can (...)
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  4. Jane Maienschein & Bertha Alvarez Manninen (2013). Joint Reply. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons. 259.
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  5. Jane Maienschein (2011). “Organization” as Setting Boundaries of Individual Development. Biological Theory 6 (1):73-79.
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  6. Jane Maienschein (2011). Why Do Stem Cells Create Such Public Controversy? Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):27-35.
    Biological development is about history, the history of an individual through time. Historically, the dominant epigenetic tradition has seen the developmental process as an unfolding of potential or in terms of the emergence of new organization that becomes an individual organism over time. The concept of development has included differentiation, growth, and morphogenesis; since the mid-nineteenth century, it has been seen in terms of cell division. Along the way have come explorations of such issues as the extent to which development (...)
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  7. Jane Maienschein (2010). Darwin's Sacred Cause: How a Hatred of Slavery Shaped Darwin's View on Human Evolution (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (1):157-158.
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  8. Jane Maienschein (2010). How We Live and Why We Die: The Secret Lives of Cells (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (2):317-319.
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  9. Jane Maienschein & Manfred D. Laubichler (2010). The Embryo Project: An Integrated Approach to History, Practices, and Social Contexts of Embryo Research. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):1 - 16.
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  10. Manfred Laubichler & Jane Maienschein (eds.) (2009). Form and Function in Developmental Evolution. Cambridge University Press.
    This book represents an effort to understand very old questions about biological form, function, and the relationships between them.
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  11. Jane Maienschein (2009). Rebels, Mavericks, and Heretics in Biology (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (3):470-471.
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  12. Jane Maienschein (2009). Controlling Life: From Jacques Loeb to Regenerative Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 42 (2):215 - 230.
    In his 1987 book "Controlling Life: Jacques Loeb and the Engineering Ideal in Biology", Philip Pauly presented his readers with the biologist Jacques Loeb and his role in developing an emphasis on control of life processes. Loeb's work on artificial parthenogenesis, for example, provided an example of bioengineering at work. This paper revisits Pauly's study of Loeb and explores the way current research in regenerative medicine reflects the same tradition. A history of regeneration research reveals patterns of thinking and research (...)
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  13. Jane Maienschein (2009). Regenerative Medicine in Historical Context. Medicine Studies 1 (1):33-40.
    The phrase “regenerative medicine” is used so often and for so many different things, with such enthusiasm or worry, and often with a sense that this is something radically new. This paper places studies of regeneration and applications in regenerative medicine into historical perspective. In fact, the first stem cell experiment was carried out in 1907, and many important lines of research have contributed since. This paper explores both what we can learn about the history and what we can learn (...)
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  14. Jane Maienschein (2008). Elizabeth Blackburn and the Story of Telomeres: Deciphering the Ends of DNA (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (4):655-658.
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  15. Jane Maienschein, Mary Sunderland, Rachel A. Ankeny & Jason Scott Robert (2008). The Ethos and Ethics of Translational Research. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):43 – 51.
    Calls for the “translation” of research from bench to bedside are increasingly demanding. What is translation, and why does it matter? We sketch the recent history of outcome-oriented translational research in the United States, with a particular focus on the Roadmap Initiative of the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD). Our main example of contemporary translational research is stem cell research, which has superseded genomics as the translational object of choice. We explore the nature of and obstacles to translational research (...)
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  16. Jason Scott Robert, Mary Sunderland, Rachel Ankeny & Jane Maienschein (2008). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “The Ethos and Ethics of Translational Research”. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):1-3.
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  17. Jane Maienschein (2007). Biotech: The Countercultural Origins of an Industry. BioScience 57 (4):373-374.
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  18. Jane Maienschein (2007). From Research to Technology. BioScience 57 (4):373-374.
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  19. Jane Maienschein (2007). What is an 'Embryo' and How Do We Know? In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  20. Jane Maienschein & Richard Creath (2007). Body Worlds as Education and Humanism. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):26 – 27.
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  21. Jason Scott Robert, Jane Maienschein & Manfred D. Laubichler (2006). Systems Bioethics and Stem Cell Biology. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):19-31.
    The complexities of modern science are not adequately reflected in many bioethical discussions. This is especially problematic in highly contested cases where there is significant pressure to generate clinical applications fast, as in stem cell research. In those cases a more integrated approach to bioethics, which we call systems bioethics, can provide a useful framework to address ethical and policy issues. Much as systems biology brings together different experimental and methodological approaches in an integrative way, systems bioethics integrates aspects of (...)
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  22. Jane Maienschein (2005). Book Review: Henry Gee, Jacob?S Ladder. The History of the Human Genome (New York: W. W. Norton, 2004), Xvi + 272 Pp., $25.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):159-161.
  23. Jane Maienschein (2004). Evolution, Embryology. Ludus Vitalis 12 (21):237-245.
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  24. Jane Maienschein (2004). Human Embryos and the Language of Scientific Research. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):6 – 7.
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  25. Garland Allen, Mark Barrow, Jane Maienschein & Everett Mendelsohn (2002). In Passing. Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):iv.
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  26. Jane Maienschein (2002). Stem Cell Research: A Target Article Collection Part II - What's in a Name: Embryos, Clones, and Stem Cells. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):12 – 19.
    In 2001, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the "Human Cloning Prohibition Act" and President Bush announced his decision to allow only limited research on existing stem cell lines but not on "embryos." In contrast, the U.K. has explicitly authorized "therapeutic cloning." Much more will be said about bioethical, legal, and social implications, but subtleties of the science and careful definitions of terms have received much less consideration. Legislators and reporters struggle to discuss "cloning," "pluripotency," "stem cells," and "embryos," and (...)
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  27. Garland Allen & Jane Maienschein (2001). Editors' Introduction. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):1-2.
  28. Jane Maienschein (2001). On Cloning: Advocating History of Biology in the Public Interest. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):423 - 432.
    Cloning -- the process of creating a cell, tissue line or even a complete organism from a single cell -- or the strands that led to the cloning of a mammal, Dolly, are not new. Yet the media coverage of Dolly's inception raised a range of reactions from fear or moral repulsion, to cautious optimism. The implications for controlling human reproduction were clearly in the forefront, though many issues about animals emerged as well. On topics of public interest such as (...)
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  29. Richard Creath & Jane Maienschein (eds.) (2000). Biology and Epistemology. Cambridge University Press.
    This set of original essays by some of the best names in philosophy of science explores a range of diverse issues in the intersection of biology and epistemology. It asks whether the study of life requires a special biological approach to knowledge and concludes that it does not. The studies, taken together, help to develop and deepen our understanding of how biology works and what counts as warranted knowledge and as legitimate approaches to the study of life. The first section (...)
     
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  30. David Magnus, Richard Creath & Jane Maienschein (2000). Biology & Epistemology. In Richard Creath & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Biology and Epistemology. Cambridge University Press.
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  31. Jane Maienschein (2000). Competing Epistemologies and Developmental Biology. In Richard Creath & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Biology and Epistemology. Cambridge University Press. 122--137.
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  32. Jane Maienschein (2000). ``Why Study History for Science?''. Biology and Philosophy 15 (3):339-348.
    David Hull has demonstrated a marvelous ability to annoy everyone who caresabout science (or should), by forcing us to confront deep truths about howscience works. Credit, priority, precularities, and process weave together tomake the very fabric of science. As Hull's studies reveal, the story is bothmessier and more irritating than those limited by a single disciplinaryperspective generally admit. By itself history is interesting enough, andphilosophy valuable enough. But taken together, they do so much in tellingus about science and by puncturing (...)
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  33. Viktor Hamburger, Garland E. Allen, Jane Maienschein & Hans Spemann (1999). Hans Spemann on Vitalism in Biology: Translation of a Portion of Spemann's "Autobiography". [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):231 - 243.
  34. Jane Maienschein (1999). Diversity in American Biology, 1900-1940. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 21 (1):35 - 52.
    This paper argues both that the decentralized and democratic context in the United States prior to World War II encouraged the development of diverse approaches, programs, and institutional supports for the biological sciences, and that the resulting pluralism is consistent with the complex and messy ways that science is used in a democratic society. This is not a claim that only U.S. science experiences such diversity, nor that the way science plays out in our American form of modified constitutional democracy, (...)
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  35. Jane Maienschein & Michael Ruse (eds.) (1999). Biology and the Foundation of Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    There has been much attention devoted in recent years to the question of whether our moral principles can be related to our biological nature. This collection of new essays focuses on the connection between biology, in particular evolutionary biology, and foundational questions in ethics. The book asks such questions as whether humans are innately selfish, and whether there are particular facets of human nature that bear directly on social practices. The volume is organised historically beginning with Aristotle and covering such (...)
     
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  36. Michael Ruse & Jane Maienschein (eds.) (1999). Biology and the Foundation of Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    There has been much attention devoted in recent years to the question of whether our moral principles can be related to our biological nature. This collection of new essays focuses on the connection between biology, in particular evolutionary biology, and foundational questions in ethics. The book asks such questions as whether humans are innately selfish, and whether there are particular facets of human nature that bear directly on social practices. The volume is organised historically beginning with Aristotle and covering such (...)
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  37. Mark V. Barrow Jr, Keith R. Benson, Paula Findlen, Deborah Fitzgerald, Joel B. Hagen, Joy Harvey, Sharon E. Kingsland, Jane Maienschein, Gregg Mitman & Lynn K. Nyhart (1996). The JHB Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 29:463-479.
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  38. Alistair Crombie & Jane Maienschein (1996). Styles of Scientific Thinking in the European Tradition. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (3):363.
     
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  39. Marjorie Grene, Sherrie L. Lyons, Mark V. Barrow Jr, Ronald Rainger, Susan Lindee, Jane Maienschein, Michael Fortun & Joel B. Hagen (1994). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 27 (1):161-175.
  40. Debra Lindsay & Jane Maienschein (1994). Saience in the Subarctic Trappers, Traders, and the Smithsonian Institution. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):355.
     
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  41. Jane Maienschein (1994). Cutting Edges Cut Both Ways. Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):1-24.
    Emphasis on cutting edge science is common today. This paper shows that the concept, which selects some science at any given time as epistemically preferable and therefore better, actually gained acceptance by the turn of this century in biology and began immediately to have consequences for what biological research was done. The result, that some research is cut out while other work is privileged, can have pernicious results. Some of what is designated as not cutting edge may, in a different (...)
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  42. Jane Maienschein (1994). 'It's a Long Way From "Amphioxus"' Anton Dohrn and Late Nineteenth Century Debates About Vertebrate Origins. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (3):465 - 478.
    Anton Dohrn rejected the popular Amphioxus-ascidian theory of vertebrate origin, which saw Amphioxus as the most primitive vertebrate and ascidians as vertebrate ancestors. Instead he argued for the segmented annelids as the more likely candidate. Attacked for being 'unscientific' by such popular morphologists as Carl Gegenbaur and Ernst Haeckel, Dohrn countered with similar accusations. Since the debate peaked as Dohrn was establishing his Stazione Zoologica in Naples at the end of the nineteenth century, it gained him valuable attention and may (...)
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  43. Jane Maienschein (1994). Pattern and Process in Early Studies of Arizona's San Francisco Peaks. BioScience 44 (7):479-485.
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  44. Vera Norwood & Jane Maienschein (1994). Made From This Earth: American Women and Nature. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (3):493.
     
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  45. Jane Maienschein (1993). Why Collaborate? Journal of the History of Biology 26 (2):167 - 183.
    The recent escalation of concern about scientific integrity has provoked a larger discussion of many questions about why we do science the way we do, as well as about how we should do it. One of these questions concerns collaboration: who should count as a collaborator? This, in turn, raises the question why collaborators collaborate, and whether and when they should. Here, history offers insights that can illuminate the current debate.
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  46. Lynn K. Nyhart, P. F. Stevens, Jane Maienschein & Mark V. Barrow Jr (1992). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 25 (3):497-504.
  47. Jane Maienschein (1991). Epistemic Styles in German and American Embryology. Science in Context 4 (2).
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  48. Jane Maienschein (1991). From Presentation to Representation in E. B. Wilson's the Cell. Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):227-254.
    Diagrams make it possible to present scientific facts in more abstract and generalized form. While some detail is lost, simplified and accessible knowledge is gained. E. B. Wilson's work in cytology provides a case study of changing uses of diagrams and accompanying abstraction. In his early work, Wilson presented his data in photographs, which he saw as coming closest to “fact.” As he gained confidence in his interpretations, and as he sought to provide a generalized textbook account of cell development, (...)
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  49. Jane Maienschein (1990). Cell Theory and Development. In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge. 357--373.
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  50. Shirley A. Roe, Sharon E. Kingsland, Jane Maienschein & Barbara G. Beddall (1989). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 22 (1):177-184.
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