Search results for 'Jane Pearce' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Ricca Edmondson & Jane Pearce (2007). The Practice of Health Care: Wisdom as a Model. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):233-244.
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  2.  27
    Ricca Edmondson, Jane Pearce & Markus H. Woerner (2009). Wisdom in Clinical Reasoning and Medical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (3):231-247.
    Exploring informal components of clinical reasoning, we argue that they need to be understood via the analysis of professional wisdom. Wise decisions are needed where action or insight is vital, but neither everyday nor expert knowledge provides solutions. Wisdom combines experiential, intellectual, ethical, emotional and practical capacities; we contend that it is also more strongly social than is usually appreciated. But many accounts of reasoning specifically rule out such features as irrational. Seeking to illuminate how wisdom operates, we therefore build (...)
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  3.  14
    Genevieve Pollock & Joseph Pearce (2010). Interview by Genevieve Pollock of ZENIT, with Newman Scholar Joseph Pearce. The Chesterton Review 36 (3-4):269-270.
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  4.  26
    David Pearce, Interview with Nick Bostrom and David Pearce.
    ANDRÉS LOMEÑA: Transhumanism, or human enhancement, suggests the use of new technologies to improve mental and physical abilities, discarding some aspects as stupidity, suffering and so forth. You have been described as technoutopian by critics who write on “Future hypes”. In my opinion, there is something pretty much worse than optimism: radical technopessimism, managed by Paul Virilio, deceased Baudrillard and other thinkers. Why is there a strong strain between the optimistic and pessimistic overview?
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  5. Guppy & Mary Jane (1863). Mary Jane; or, Spiritualism Chemically Explained [by - Guppy].
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  6.  20
    Stratford Caldecott (2002). Recent Biographies: Tolkien: Man and Myth (A Literary Life), by Joseph Pearce; Tolkien: A Celebration, by Joseph Pearce; Tolkien: A Biography, by Michael White; J. R. R. Tolkien: The Man Who Created The Lord of the Rings, by Michael Coren; J. R. R. Tolkien: Artist and Illustrator, by Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull; The Inklings Handbook, by Colin Duriez and David Porter; Tolkien's Ring, by David Day; Tolkien's Art: A Mythology for England, by Jane Chance. [REVIEW] The Chesterton Review 28 (1/2):135-137.
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  7.  14
    Steve Pearce (2011). Answering the Neo-Szaszian Critique: Are Cluster B Personality Disorders Really So Different? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (3):203-208.
    I was delighted to be asked to comment on Peter Zachar’s paper, partly because he presents an elegant proposal for how personality disorders (PD) might be considered to fit into a broadly medical conception of disorder, but also because the overlap between moral and clinical elements of disorder, and more broadly moral and clinical psychiatric kinds, seems to me to be a question central to the theory and practice of psychiatry. The moral context of diagnosis and treatment is a question (...)
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  8.  4
    Noel Semple, Russell G. Pearce & Renee Newman Knake (2013). A Taxonomy of Lawyer Regulation: How Contrasting Theories of Regulation Explain the Divergent Regulatory Regimes in Australia, England and Wales, and North America. Legal Ethics 16 (2):258-283.
    Dr Noel Semple, Professor Russell Pearce and Professor Renee Knake combine to compare legal profession regulation in the US with that of the countries closest to it institutionally and culturally: Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Ireland. This enables them to develop an illuminating taxonomy of legal professional regulation, and to describe the assumptions and objectives underlying the different approaches to regulation. The US and Canada provide a 'professionalist-independent framework' that centres on 'a unified, hegemonic occupation of (...)
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  9. Roy Harvey Pearce (1981). Whitman Justified: The Poet in 1855. Critical Inquiry 8 (1):83-97.
    Whitman was not one to be troubled about the solution of the problem of knowledge in particular, much less in general, nor for that matter was Emerson. Their way was to postulate solutions to problems just before they encountered them. My point, however, is that Whitman, with Emerson, did encounter a problem, the Diltheyan solution to which has tempted philosophers of history into our own time. If quoting Dilthey as a gloss on Emerson I would seem to want to involve (...)
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  10.  76
    Ignacio Jané (2006). What is Tarski's Common Concept of Consequence? Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (1):1-42.
    In 1936 Tarski sketched a rigorous definition of the concept of logical consequence which, he claimed, agreed quite well with common usage-or, as he also said, with the common concept of consequence. Commentators of Tarski's paper have usually been elusive as to what this common concept is. However, being clear on this issue is important to decide whether Tarski's definition failed (as Etchemendy has contended) or succeeded (as most commentators maintain). I argue that the common concept of consequence that Tarski (...)
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  11. David Pearce, Naturalistic Panpsychism.
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  12.  19
    David Pearce (1981). Is There Any Theoretical Justification for a Nonstatement View of Theories? Synthese 46 (1):1 - 39.
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  13. Kenneth L. Pearce (2008). The Semantics of Sense Perception in Berkeley. Religious Studies 44 (3):249-268.
    George Berkeley's linguistic account of sense perception is one of the most central tenets of his philosophy. It is intended as a solution to a wide range of critical issues in both metaphysics and theology. However, it is not clear from Berkeley's writings just how this ‘universal language of the Author of Nature’ is to be interpreted. This paper discusses the nature of the theory of sense perception as language, together with its metaphysical and theological motivations, then proceeds to develop (...)
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  14.  73
    David Pearce (1983). Truthlikeness and Translation: A Comment on Oddie. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 34 (4):380-385.
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  15.  61
    Ignacio Jané & Gabriel Uzquiano (2004). Well- and Non-Well-Founded Fregean Extensions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (5):437-465.
    George Boolos has described an interpretation of a fragment of ZFC in a consistent second-order theory whose only axiom is a modification of Frege's inconsistent Axiom V. We build on Boolos's interpretation and study the models of a variety of such theories obtained by amending Axiom V in the spirit of a limitation of size principle. After providing a complete structural description of all well-founded models, we turn to the non-well-founded ones. We show how to build models in which foundation (...)
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  16.  12
    David Pearce & Veikko Rantala (1983). New Foundations for Metascience. Synthese 56 (1):1 - 26.
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  17.  62
    David Pearce (1982). Stegmüller on Kuhn and Incommensurability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (4):389-396.
  18.  80
    Ignagio Jane (2001). Reflections on Skolem's Relativity of Set-Theoretical Concepts. Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):129-153.
    In this paper an attempt is made to present Skolem's argument, for the relativity of some set-theoretical notions as a sensible one. Skolem's critique of set theory is seen as part of a larger argument to the effect that no conclusive evidence has been given for the existence of uncountable sets. Some replies to Skolem are discussed and are shown not to affect Skolem's position, since they all presuppose the existence of uncountable sets. The paper ends with an assessment of (...)
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  19.  23
    Johan van Benthem & David Pearce (1984). A Mathematical Characterization of Interpretation Between Theories. Studia Logica 43 (3):295-303.
    Of the various notions of reduction in the logical literature, relative interpretability in the sense of Tarskiet al. [6] appears to be the central one. In the present note, this syntactic notion is characterized semantically, through the existence of a suitable reduction functor on models. The latter mathematical condition itself suggests a natural generalization, whose syntactic equivalent turns out to be a notion of interpretability quite close to that of Ershov [1], Szczerba [5] and Gaifman [2].
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  20.  70
    David Pearce (1987). Critical Realism in Progress: Reflections on Ilkka Niiniluoto's Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 27 (2):147 - 171.
  21.  70
    Ignacio Jané (1995). The Role of the Absolute Infinite in Cantor's Conception of Set. Erkenntnis 42 (3):375 - 402.
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  22.  88
    David Pearce, Reductionism and Knowledge.
    in How Many Questions?, ed. Leigh S. Cauman, Isaac Levi, Charles Parsons, and Robert Schwartz, Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Co., 1983, pp. 276-300.
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  23.  7
    David Pearce (1981). Comments on a Criterion of Theoreticity. Synthese 48 (1):77 - 86.
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  24.  37
    Ignacio Jane (1997). Theoremhood and Logical Consequence. Theoria 12 (1):139-160.
    In this paper, Tarskis notion of Logical Consequence is viewed as a special case of the more general notion of being a theorem of an axiomatic theory. As was recognized by Tarski, the material adequacy of his definition depends on having the distinction between logical and non logical constants right, but we find Tarskis analysis persuasive even if we dont agree on what constants are logical. This accords with the view put forward in this paper that Tarski indeed captures the (...)
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  25.  73
    Ignacio Jané (2005). Review of C. Badesa, The Birth of Model Theory: Löwenheim's Theorem in the Frame of the Theory of Relatives. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 13 (1):91-106.
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  26.  43
    Ignacio Jané (2003). Remarks on Second-Order Consequence. Theoria 18 (2):179-187.
    Tarski’s definition of logical consequence can take different forms when implemented in second order languages, depending on what counts as a model. In the canonical, or standard, version, a model is just an ordinary structure and the (monadic) second-order variables are meant to range over all subsets of its domain. We discuss the dependence of canonical second-order consequence on set theory and raise doubts on the assumption that canonical consequence is a definite relation.
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  27.  11
    David Pearce (1982). Logical Properties of the Structuralist Concept of Reduction. Erkenntnis 18 (3):307 - 333.
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  28.  16
    David Pearce & Agustín Valverde (2005). A First Order Nonmonotonic Extension of Constructive Logic. Studia Logica 80 (2-3):321 - 346.
    Certain extensions of Nelson's constructive logic N with strong negation have recently become important in arti.cial intelligence and nonmonotonic reasoning, since they yield a logical foundation for answer set programming (ASP). In this paper we look at some extensions of Nelson's .rst-order logic as a basis for de.ning nonmonotonic inference relations that underlie the answer set programming semantics. The extensions we consider are those based on 2-element, here-and-there Kripke frames. In particular, we prove completeness for .rst-order here-and-there logics, and their (...)
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  29.  53
    David Pearce (1988). Intensionality and the Nature of a Musical Work. British Journal of Aesthetics 28 (2):105-118.
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  30. David Pearce (1981). On a New Approach to Metascience. Helsingin Yliopisto Filosofian Laitos.
     
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  31.  26
    David Pearce & Veikko Rantala (1983). Constructing General Models of Theory Dynamics. Studia Logica 42 (2-3):347 - 362.
    This essay is an attempt to consider dynamic aspects of scientific theorising from a formal perspective. Our emphasis will be on the aims and methods for constructing formal models of theory dynamics which will be conceived from a general or 'theoretical' rather than 'applied' standpoint.
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  32.  23
    David Pearce & Veikko Rantala (1985). Approximative Explanation is Deductive-Nomological. Philosophy of Science 52 (1):126-140.
    We revive the idea that a deductive-nomological explanation of a scientific theory by its successor may be defensible, even in those common and troublesome cases where the theories concerned are mutually incompatible; and limiting, approximating and counterfactual assumptions may be required in order to define a logical relation between them. Our solution is based on a general characterization of limiting relations between physical theories using the method of nonstandard analysis.
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  33.  13
    David Pearce & Veikko Rantala (1982). Realism and Reference. Synthese 52 (3):439 - 448.
  34.  19
    David Pearce & Veikko Rantala (1984). A Logical Study of the Correspondence Relation. Journal of Philosophical Logic 13 (1):47 - 84.
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  35.  9
    David Pearce & Veikko Rantala (1982). Realism and Formal Semantics. Synthese 52 (1):39--53.
    The doctrines of scientific realism have enjoyed a close and enduring, if not always harmonious, association with Tarski's semantic conception of truth and theories of formal semantics generally. From its inception Tarski's theory received unqualified support from some realists, like Karl Popper, who saw it as legitimizing the use of semantic notions in epistemology and the philosophy of science.
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  36.  43
    M. Rosaria Nucci Pearce & David Pearce (1989). Technology Vs. Science: The Cognitive Fallacy. Synthese 81 (3):405 - 419.
    There are fundamental differences between the explanation of scientific change and the explanation of technological change. The differences arise from fundamental differences between scientific and technological knowledge and basic disanalogies between technological advance and scientific progress. Given the influence of economic markets and industrial and institutional structures on the development of technology, it is more plausible to regard technological change as a continuous and incremental process, rather than as a process of Kuhnian crises and revolutions.
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  37.  17
    David Pearce & Veikko Rantala (1983). Correspondence as an Intertheory Relation. Studia Logica 42 (2-3):363 - 371.
    In this paper we give the gist of our reconstructed notion of (limiting case) correspondence. Our notion is very general, so that it should be applicable to all the cases in which a correspondence has been said to exist in actual science.
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  38.  11
    David Pearce (1989). Translation, Reduction and Commensurability: A Note on Schroeder-Heister and Schaefer. Philosophy of Science 56 (1):158-164.
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  39.  20
    Ignacio Jané (1988). Lógica Y Ontología. Theoria 4 (1):81-106.
    In this paper we discuss the way logical consequence depends on what sets there are. We try to find out what set-theoretical assumptions have to be made to determine a logic, i.e., to give a definite answer to whether any given argument is correct. Consideration of second order logic -which is left highly indetermined by the usual set-theoretical axioms- prompts us to suggest a slightly different but natural nation of logical consequence, which reduces second order logic indeterminacy without interfering with (...)
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  40.  37
    David Pearce, Mind, Brain and the Quantum.
    Does introspection grant us privileged insight into the intrinsic nature of the stuff of the world? Michael Lockwood 's startling answer is yes. Quantum mechanics may indeed supply a complete formal description of the universe. Yet what "breathes fire into" the quantum-theoretic equations, it transpires, isn't physical in the traditional sense at all.
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  41.  33
    David Pearce (1984). Research Traditions, Incommensurability and Scientific Progress. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 15 (2):261-271.
    Summary In hisProgress and its Problems, Laudan dismisses the problem of incommensurability in science by endorsing two general assertions. The first claims there are actually no incommensurable pairs of theories or research traditions; the second maintains that his problem-solving model of scientific progress would be able rationally to appraise even incommensurable pairs of theories or traditions (are compare them for their progressiveness). I argue here that Laudan fails to provide a plausible defence of either thesis, and that this creates some (...)
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  42.  8
    Toby M. Pearce (2003). Did They Talk Their Way Out of Africa? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):235-236.
    Corballis suggests that fully vocal communication was invented by modern humans between 170,000 and 50,000 years ago. Because this new form of communication did not require hand gestures, he wondered whether this may have facilitated the development of lithic manufacture. I cast doubt on this interesting notion but offer an enhanced version that may have more potential.
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  43.  4
    Richard Pearce (1999). Social Responsibility in the Marketplace: Asymmetric Information in Food Labelling. Business Ethics 8 (1):26–36.
    This paper takes as its focus the adoption by the Co‐operative Wholesale Society of what appears to be a socially responsible stance on food labelling practice and policy through the publication of a public report and a proposed code of practice.The central issue in the debate surrounding labelling is the question of ‘asymmetric information’ . In order to function, markets need perfect information. The existence of asymmetric information gives rise to ‘market failure’ which prevents the ‘free market’ from functioning according (...)
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  44.  23
    Jenny Pearce (2007). Toward a Post-Representational Politics?: Participation in the 21st Century. World Futures 63 (5 & 6):464 – 478.
    Representational democracy has been the main form of government in the West since the English, American, and French revolutions of the 17th and 18th centuries. However, there are indications that its ability to frame the relationship between citizen and state has begun to weaken. This weakening can be traced to many factors. One of these is the emergence of new collective actors, such as social movements, and the (re)recognition of the arena of "civil society" just as the articulating power of (...)
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  45.  18
    David Pearce, The Abolitionist Project.
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  46.  15
    Carole Pearce (1992). African Philosophy and the Sociological Thesis. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 22 (4):440-460.
    "African philosophy," when conceived of as ethnophilosophy, is based on the idea that all thought is social, culture-bound, or based in natural language. But ethnophilosophy, whatever its sociological status, makes no contribution to philosophy, which is necessarily invulnerable to the sociological thesis. The sociological thesis must be limited in application to its own proper domain. The conflation of sociological and philosophical discourse arises from the fallacy of misplaced concreteness. This fallacy is responsible, among other things, for the sociological misinterpretation of (...)
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  47. Glenn Pearce & Patrick Maynard (eds.) (1973). Conceptual Change. Boston,D. Reidel.
  48. Joseph Chilton Pearce (1971). The Crack in the Cosmic Egg. [New York]Julian Press.
  49.  13
    Maria Rosaria Nucci Pearce & David Pearce (1989). Economics and Technological Change: Some Conceptual and Methodological Issues. Erkenntnis 30 (1-2):101 - 127.
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  50.  2
    Carl G. Jockusch Jr, Richard Laver, Donald Monk, Jan Mycielski & Jon Pearce (1984). Annual Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic: Denver, 1983. Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (2):674 - 682.
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