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Profile: Janet Donohoe (University of West Georgia)
  1. Janet Donohoe (2014). Remembering Places: A Phenomenological Study of the Relationship Between Memory and Place. Lexington Books.
     
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  2. Janet Donohoe (2012). The Nonpresence of the Living Present. Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):221-230.
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  3. Janet Donohoe (2010). The Vocation of Motherhood: Husserl and Feminist Ethics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):127-140.
    In this paper, I explore a confrontation between Husserl’s ethical position of vocation and its absolute ought with a feminist ethical position. I argue that Husserl’s ethics has a great deal to offer a feminist ethics by providing for the possibility of an ethics that is particular rather than universal, that recognizes the role of the social through tradition in establishing values and norms without conceding the ethical responsibility of the individual, and that acknowledges the role of both reason and (...)
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  4. Janet Donohoe (2009). Where Were You When ... ? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):105-113.
    This paper argues that private, individual memory is often only made possible through a collectivelhistorical memory that makes itself felt at a most fundamental level of place. It draws upon Husserl's concept of the lifeworld in opposition to Ricoeur's notion of narrative identity. I show that in focusing on narrative, Ricoeur fails to recognize the ways in which the very constitution of the world, of places, becomes the avenue of support for narratives, intersubjectivity, and collective memory. The analysis makes explicit (...)
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  5. Janet Donohoe (2009). Where Were You When ... ?: On the Relationship Between Individual Memory and Collective Memory. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):105-113.
    This paper argues that private, individual memory is often only made possible through a collectivelhistorical memory that makes itself felt at a most fundamental level of place. It draws upon Husserl's concept of the lifeworld in opposition to Ricoeur's notion of narrative identity. I show that in focusing on narrative, Ricoeur fails to recognize the ways in which the very constitution of the world, of places, becomes the avenue of support for narratives, intersubjectivity, and collective memory. The analysis makes explicit (...)
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  6. Janet Donohoe (2007). Women's Liberation and the Sublime. Environmental Philosophy 4 (1/2):198-200.
  7. Janet Donohoe (2006). Rushing to Memorialize. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (1):6-12.
    In the wake of the current rush to memorialize tragic events such as the World Trade Center attack of 2001, this article explores thefunction and role of monuments and memorials in the production of places for collective memory, communal mourning, and the preservation of the past. It argues that the rush to memorialize indicates a desire to control the way that an event is understood in bothcontemporary and future times and ultimately limits the effectiveness of memorials. Finally, drawing upon Heidegger, (...)
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  8. Janet Donohoe (2004). Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity: From Static to Genetic Phenomenology. Humanity Books.
    On the distinction between static and genetic phenomenologies -- On time consciousness and its relationship to intersubjectivity -- On the question of intersubjectivity -- The Husserlian account of ethics -- Conclusion: The impact of genetic phenomenology.
     
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  9. Janet Donohoe (2003). Genetic Phenomenology and the Husserlian Account of Ethics. Philosophy Today 47 (2):160-175.
  10. Janet Donohoe (2002). Dwelling with Monuments. Philosophy and Geography 5 (2):235 – 242.
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  11. Janet Donohoe (2000). The Nonpresence of the Living Present: Husserl's Time Manuscripts. Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):221-230.
    Derrida suggests in Speech a n d Phenomena that for Husserl subjectivity is constituted and entails no identity with itself at the level of the living present. He further suggests that Husserl’s understanding of absolute subjectivity is “as absolutely present and absolutely self-present being, only in its opposition to the object.”’ In making such claims, Derrida is not giving as much weight to Husserl’s manuscripts from the 1930s as those warrant. The manuscripts may serve to draw Derrida’s claims into question.2 (...)
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  12. Janet Donohoe (1998). Genetic Phenomenology, Intersubjectivity and the Husserlian Account of Ethics. Dissertation, Boston College
    The development of genetic phenomenology marks a change in Husserl's thinking which occurred between 1917 and 1921. Much of the second half of his philosophical life was devoted to genetic phenomenology as a supplement to the static phenomenology of his earlier writings. I argue that the development of genetic phenomenology, which involves a regressive inquiry into the genesis of the ego and of meaning, coincided with and made possible a greater emphasis on ethical and intersubjective positions in Husserl's later writings. (...)
     
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