Search results for 'Janet Varner Gunn' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Janet Varner Gunn (1998). Book Review: Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. The Roots of Thinking. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990. And Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. The Roots of Power: Animate Form and Gendered Bodies. Chicago: Open Court, 1994. [REVIEW] Hypatia 13 (3):177-181.
  2. Janet Varner Gunn (1998). Book Review: Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. The Roots of Thinking. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990. And Maxine Sheets-Johnstone. The Roots of Power: Animate Form and Gendered Bodies. Chicago: Open Court, 1994. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 13 (3):177-181.
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  3. Gary Varner, Varner, Gary E. "Do Species Have Standing?" Environmental Ethics 9 (1987): Pp. 57-72.
    In his recent article Should Trees Have Standing? Revisited" Christopher D. Stone has effectively withdrawn his proposal that natural objects be granted legal rights, in response to criticism from the Feinberg/McCloskey camp. Stone now favors a weaker proposal that natural objects be granted what he calls legal "considerateness". I argue that Stone's retreat is both unnecessary and undesirable. I develop the notion of a "de facto" legal right and argue that species already have de facto legal rights as statutory beneficiaries (...)
     
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  4. Paul Alexandre R. Janet, Henry Jones, Ada Monahan & Gabriel Séailles (1902). A History of the Problems of Philosophy by P. Janet & G. Séailles, Tr. By A. Monahan, Ed. By H. Jones.
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  5. Paul Janet (1986). Paul Janet: la crise du spiritualisme. Corpus 3:133-148.
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  6. Paul Janet & Mary Chapman (1884). The Theory of Morals by Paul Janet; Tr. From the Latest French Edition by Mary Chapman. T. & T. Clark.
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  7. Gary E. Varner (1998). In Nature's Interests?: Interests, Animal Rights, and Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a powerful response to what Varner calls the "two dogmas of environmental ethics"--the assumptions that animal rights philosophies and anthropocentric views are each antithetical to sound environmental policy. Allowing that every living organism has interests which ought, other things being equal, to be protected, Varner contends that some interests take priority over others. He defends both a sentientist principle giving priority to the lives of organisms with conscious desires and an anthropocentric principle giving priority to (...)
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  8.  2
    Gary E. Varner (2012). Personhood, Ethics, and Animal Cognition: Situating Animals in Hare's Two Level Utilitarianism. OUP Usa.
    Drawing heavily on recent empirical research to update R.M. Hare's two-level utilitarianism and expand Hare's treatment of "intuitive level rules," Gary Varner considers in detail the theory's application to animals while arguing that Hare should have recognized a hierarchy of persons, near-persons, & the merely sentient.
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  9. Gary E. Varner (1994). Rejoinder to Kathryn Paxton George. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):83-86.
    In Use and Abuse Revisited: Response to Pluhar and Varner, Kathryn Paxton George misunderstands the point of my essay, In Defense of the Vegan Ideal: Rhetoric and Bias in the Nutrition Literature. I did not claim that the nutrition literature unambiguously confirms that vegans are not at significantly greater risk of deficiencies than omnivores. Rather than settling any empirical controversy, my aim was to show how the literature can give the casual reader a skewed impression of what is known (...)
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  10.  9
    Giles B. Gunn (2001). Beyond Solidarity: Pragmatism and Difference in a Globalized World. University of Chicago Press.
    Beyond Solidarity is an impassioned argument for a sharable morality in a world increasingly fractured along lines of difference. Giles Gunn asks how human solidarity can be reconceived when its expressions have become increasingly exceptionalist and outmoded, and when the pressures of globalization divide as much as they unify. He finds the terms for answering these questions in a more inclusive, cosmopolitan pragmatism--one willing to explore fundamental values without recourse to absolutist arguments. Drawing on the work of William and (...)
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  11. Richard Gunn & J. A. W. Gunn (1983). Beyond Liberty and Property: The Process of Self-Recognition in Eighteenth-Century Political Thought. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The themes explored include political liberty, "legal tyranny," defences of influence in government, recognition of the Opposition, and the development of organic categories of political analysis - the latter in a chapter that explodes the association often presumed between organicism and conservative modes of thought. A chapter on the "Fourth Estate" examines the gradual process of legitimation of "interests," culminating in the influence of the press. Central to the account of new political forces and their recognition is the idea of (...)
     
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  12. Giles Gunn (2001). Beyond Solidarity: Pragmatism and Difference in a Globalized World. University of Chicago Press.
    _Beyond Solidarity_ is an impassioned argument for a sharable morality in a world increasingly fractured along lines of difference. Giles Gunn asks how human solidarity can be reconceived when its expressions have become increasingly exceptionalist and outmoded, and when the pressures of globalization divide as much as they unify. He finds the terms for answering these questions in a more inclusive, cosmopolitan pragmatism—one willing to explore fundamental values without recourse to absolutist arguments. Drawing on the work of William and (...)
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  13. Gary E. Varner (2002). In Nature's Interests?: Interests, Animal Rights, and Environmental Ethics. OUP Usa.
    Varner challenges the assumption that animal rights theory and anthropocentric views are at odds with each other. He attempts to reconcile them by arguing that every living organism has interests which ought to be protected, but that some interests--particularly those belonging to sentient animals with conscious desires--are more important than others. The author is not unduly influenced by radical or conservative environmental positions and effectively establishes an individualistic and accessible framework that will be given credence by both camps. In (...)
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  14. Colin Allen & Gary Varner, Prolegomena to Any Future Arti® Cial Moral Agent.
    As arti® cial intelligence moves ever closer to the goal of producing fully autonomous agents, the question of how to design and implement an arti® cial moral agent (AMA) becomes increasingly pressing. Robots possessing autonomous capacities to do things that are useful to humans will also have the capacity to do things that are harmful to humans and other sentient beings. Theoretical challenges to developing arti® cial moral agents result both from controversies among ethicists about moral theory itself, and from (...)
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  15. David Gunn & Indrakumar Vetharaniam (1995). Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and the Conventionality of Simultaneity. Philosophy of Science 62 (4):599-608.
  16.  26
    Gary Varner (2008). Utilitarianism and the Evolution of Ecological Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):551-573.
    R.M. Hare’s two-level utilitarianism provides a useful framework for understanding the evolution of codes of professional ethics. From a Harean perspective, the codes reflect both the fact that members of various professions face special kinds of ethically charged situations in the normal course of their work, and the need for people in special roles to acquire various habits of thought and action. This highlights the role of virtue in professional ethics and provides guidance to professional societies when considering modifications to (...)
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  17. Gary E. Varner (1994). What's Wrong with Animalby-Products? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):7-17.
    Without looking beyond the conditions under which laying hens typically live in the contemporary U.S. egg industry, we can understand why the production and consumption of factory farmed eggs could be judged immoral. However, the question, What (if anything) is wrong with animal by-products? cannot always be adequately answered by looking at the conditions under which animals live out their productive lives. For the dairy industry looks benign in those terms, but if we look beyond the conditions under which milk (...)
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  18.  49
    Gary E. Varner (1994). In Defense of the Vegan Ideal: Rhetoric and Bias in the Nutrition Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):29-40.
    Much of the scientific literature on vegetarian nutrition leaves one with the impression that vegan diets are significantly more risky than omnivorous ones, especially for individuals with high metabolic demands (such as pregnant or lactating women and children). But nutrition researchers have tended to skew their study populations toward new vegetarians, members of religious sects with especially restrictive diets and tendencies to eschew fortified foods and medical care, and these are arguably the last people we would expect to thrive on (...)
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  19.  97
    G. Varner (2007). Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Philosophical Review 116 (2):281-286.
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  20.  24
    David J. Mellor, Tamara J. Diesch, Alistair J. Gunn & Laura Bennet (2005). The Importance of 'Awareness' for Understanding Fetal Pain. Brain Research Reviews 49 (3):455-471.
  21.  20
    Gary E. Varner (1991). No Holism Without Pluralism. Environmental Ethics 13 (2):175-179.
    In his recent essay on moral pluralism in environmental ethics, J. Baird Callicott exaggerates the advantages of monism, ignoring the environmentally unsound implications of Leopold’s holism. In addition, he fails to see that Leopold’s view requires the same kind of intellectual schitzophrenia for which he criticizes the version of moral pluralism advocated by Christopher D. Stone in Earth and Other Ethics. If itis plausible to say that holistic entities like ecosystems are directly morally considerable-and that is a very big if-it (...)
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  22.  29
    Alastair S. Gunn (1991). The Restoration of Species and Natural Environments. Environmental Ethics 13 (4):291-310.
    My aims in this article are threefold. First, I evaluate attempts to drive a wedge between the human and the natural in order to show that destroyed natural environments and extinct species cannot be restored; next, I examine the analogy between aesthetic value and the value of natural environments; and finally, I suggest briefly a different set of analogies with such human associations as families and cultures. My tentative conclusion is that while the recreation of extinct species may be logically (...)
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  23.  8
    Ian Buchanan & Robert Gunn (2007). The Interpretation of Human Rights in English Social Work: An Exploration in the Context of Services for Children and for Parents with Learning Difficulties. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (2):147-162.
    Human rights are a central part of a social worker's value base in contemporary practice, but the structures by which social work services are delivered can adversely affect practitioners? abilities to uphold service user rights. This article describes the organizational development of social work services in England and the evolution of a rights focus for the practice of social work. It uses two cases, participation by children and young people looked after by the local authority and parents with learning difficulties, (...)
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  24.  12
    J. A. W. Gunn (1993). Paul Langford, Public Life and the Propertied Englishman, 1689–1798, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1991, Pp. Xiv, 608. Utilitas 5 (2):328.
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  25.  38
    Gary E. Varner (1990). Biological Functions and Biological Interests. Southern Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):251-270.
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  26.  14
    Stephanie Janet (1995). A Propos de “A New French Thought”. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 5 (1):67-71.
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  27.  51
    Gary Varner (2011). Do Fish Feel Pain? Environmental Ethics 33 (2):219-222.
  28.  12
    Albert E. Gunn (2000). Recent Titles in Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 53 (4):971-991.
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  29.  19
    Alastair S. Gunn (1998). Rethinking Communities: Environmental Ethics in an Urbanized World. Environmental Ethics 20 (4):341-360.
    Humans have largely transformed the natural environment and there is scarcely an area of the world which has not been affected by human activity. Human domination of the environment, in particular by the creation of infrastructure, urbanization, and conversion to agriculture, has mostly proceeded in an unplanned and frequently destructive manner. Almost fifty percent of humans already live in cities and this proportion will continue to grow. However, issues of urbanization are little addressed in the environmental philosophical literature. I explore (...)
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  30.  12
    J. Alexander Gunn (1922). The Philosophy of Emile Boutroux. The Monist 32 (2):164-179.
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  31.  13
    Alastair S. Gunn (1994). Environmental Ethics and Tropical Rain Forests: Should Greens Have Standing? Environmental Ethics 16 (1):21-40.
    Almost everyone in the developed world wants the logging of tropical rain forests to stop. Like Antarctica, they are said to be much too important and much too valuable to be utilized just for development and are said to be part of a global heritage. However, it is not that simple. People in the developing world consider our criticisms to be ill-informed, patronizing, and self-serving. We are seen as having “dirty hands.” They hold that we neither have nor deserve moral (...)
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  32.  40
    Gary Varner (2011). Speciesism and Reverse Speciesism. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):171 - 173.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 171-173, June 2011.
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  33.  9
    Gary Varner (2007). Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):307-312.
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  34.  22
    Gary E. Varner (1990). Biological Functions and Biological Interests. Southern Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):251-270.
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  35.  19
    Alastair S. Gunn (1980). Why Should We Care About Rare Species? Environmental Ethics 2 (1):17-37.
    Concern for the fate of rare species leads us to ask why the extermination of species is wrong. No satisfactory account can be given in terms of animal rights, and a speciesist perspective can yield at best only a case for preservation of those species which enough people happen to care about. An attempt is made to analyze the concept of rarity, and its relation to value. Finally, it is suggested that the problem can be resolved only in terms of (...)
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  36.  2
    Michael Berk & Miles Leigh Janet (1999). Evidence‐Based Psychiatric Practice: Doctrine or Trap? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 5 (2):149-152.
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  37.  14
    J. Alexander Gunn (1924). Ribot and His Contribution to Psychology. The Monist 34 (1):1-14.
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  38.  30
    Alastair S. Gunn (1983). Traditional Ethics and the Moral Status of Animals. Environmental Ethics 5 (2):133-153.
    Most philosophical discussion of the moral status of animals takes place within a context of traditional ethics. I argue that the conceptual apparatus of utilitarianism and rights theory is historically and logically tied to an individualistic, atomistic concept of society. The liberal-democratic tradition is thus an unsuitable framework for understanding, analyzing, and solving environmental problems, including themoral status of animals. Concepts such as stewardship or trusteeship are more appropriate for the development of an environmental ethic.
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  39.  14
    Pierre Janet (1927). La peur de l'action: Les terminaisons de l'action, Les échecs et Les triomphes. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 104:5 - 21.
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  40. Gary Varner (2008). Personhood, Memory, and Elephant Management. In Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.), Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence. Johns Hopkins University Press
  41.  32
    F. Janet (2007). Review of J. Norman, After Euclid: Visual Reasoning and the Epistemology of Diagrams. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 15 (1):116-121.
    This monograph treats the important topic of the epistemology of diagrams in Euclidean geometry. Norman argues that diagrams play a genuine justificatory role in traditional Euclidean arguments, and he aims to account for these roles from a modified Kantian perspective. Norman considers himself a semi-Kantian in the following broad sense: he believes that Kant was right that ostensive constructions are necessary in order to follow traditional Euclidean proofs, but he wants to avoid appealing to Kantian a priori intuition as the (...)
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  42.  28
    G. E. Varner (1985). The Schopenhauerian Challenge in Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 7 (3):209-229.
    Environmental holism and environmental individualism are based on incompatible notions of moral considerability, and yield incompatible results. For Schopenhauer, every intelligible character--every irreducible instance of formative nature---defines a distinct moral patient, and for hirn both holistic entities and the individual members of higher species have distinguishable intelligible characters. Schopenhauer’s neglected metaethics thus can be used to generate an environmental ethics which is complete in the sense of synthesizing holism and individualism while simultaneously meeting TomRegan’s (implicit) demand that an environmental ethics (...)
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  43.  7
    Giles B. Gunn (2013). Creation and Discovery. Renascence 22 (4):198-206.
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  44.  12
    Alastair S. Gunn (1979). Writing Philosophical Essays. Teaching Philosophy 3 (2):203-211.
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  45.  12
    Alastair S. Gunn (1997). Debating Point. Health Care Analysis 5 (1):74-77.
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  46.  8
    G. E. Varner (1987). Do Species Have Standing? Environmental Ethics 9 (1):57-72.
    In arecent article Christopher D. Stone has effectively withdrawn his proposal that natural objects be granted legal rights, in response to criticism from the Feinberg/McCloskey camp. Stone now favors a weaker proposal that natural objects be granted what he calls legal considerateness. I argue that Stone’s retreat is both unnecessary and undesirable. I develop the notion of a de facto legal right and argue that species already have legal rights as statutory beneflciaries of the Endangered Species Act of 1973. I (...)
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  47.  4
    Gary E. Varner (1994). The Prospects for Consensus and Convergence in the Animal Rights Debate. Hastings Center Report 24 (1):24-28.
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  48.  28
    Alastair S. Gunn (2001). Environmental Ethics and Trophy Hunting. Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):68-95.
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  49.  8
    Pierre Janet (1886). Les actes inconscients et le dédoublement de la personnalité pendant le somnambulisme provoqué. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 22:577 - 592.
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  50.  9
    Gary E. Varner (1992). Overtapped Oasis. Environmental Ethics 14 (1):93-94.
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