4 found
Janice McLane [4]Janice Ruth Mclane [1]
  1.  20
    Janice McLane (1996). The Voice on the Skin: Self-Mutilation and Merleau-Ponty's Theory of Language. Hypatia 11 (4):107 - 118.
    Self-mutilation is generally seen only as a negative response to trauma. But when trauma cannot be expressed, other forms of communication become necessary. As gestural communication, self-mutilation can reorganize and stabilize the trauma victim's world, providing a "voice on the skin" when the actual voice is forbidden. This is a plausible extension of Merleau-Ponty's gestural theory of language, and an interesting comment on his notion of "reversibility" as essential to linguistic communication.
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    Janice McLane (1993). Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essays in Feminist Philosophy and Social Theory. Radical Philosophy Review of Books 7 (7):1-4.
  3. Thomas J. Altizer, Edward Casey, Thomas L. Dumm, Elizabeth Grosz, David Karnos, David Farrell Krell, Alphonso Lingis, Gerald Majer, Janice McLane, Jean-Luc Nancy & Mary Zournazi (2003). Encounters with Alphonso Lingis. Lexington Books.
    Encounters with Alphonso Lingis is the first extensive study of this American philosopher who is gaining an international reputation to augment his national one. The distinguished contributors to this volume address most of the central themes found in Lingis's writings—including singularity and otherness, death and eroticism, emotions and rationality, embodiment and the face, excess and the sacred. The book closes with a new essay by Lingis himself.
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  4. Janice McLane (1993). Alienation, Cultural Differences, and Moral Judgement. Philosophy Today 37 (1):78-88.
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