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  1.  8 DLs
    Robin Walker & Jason B. Mattingley (1998). Pathological Completion: The Blind Leading the Mind? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):778-779.
    The taxonomy proposed by Pessoa et al. should be extended to include “pathological” completion phenomena in patients with unilateral brain damage. Patients with visual field defects (hemianopias) may “complete” whole figures, while patients with parietal lobe damage may “complete” partial figures. We argue that the former may be consistent with the brain “filling-in” information, and the latter may be consistent with the brain ignoring the absence of information.
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  2.  7 DLs
    Anina N. Rich, John L. Bradshaw & Jason B. Mattingley (2005). A Systematic, Large-Scale Study of Synaesthesia: Implications for the Role of Early Experience in Lexical-Colour Associations. Cognition 98 (1):53-84.
  3.  7 DLs
    Jacqueline C. Snow & Jason B. Mattingley (2003). Perception, Unconscious. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group
  4.  4 DLs
    Anina N. Rich & Jason B. Mattingley (2013). The Role of Attention in Synesthesia. In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press 265.
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  5.  3 DLs
    Ranmalee Eramudugolla, Marc R. Kamke, Salvador Soto-Faraco & Jason B. Mattingley (2011). Perceptual Load Influences Auditory Space Perception in the Ventriloquist Aftereffect. Cognition 118 (1):62-74.
    A period of exposure to trains of simultaneous but spatially offset auditory and visual stimuli can induce a temporary shift in the perception of sound location. This phenomenon, known as the 'ventriloquist aftereffect', reflects a realignment of auditory and visual spatial representations such that they approach perceptual alignment despite their physical spatial discordance. Such dynamic changes to sensory representations are likely to underlie the brain's ability to accommodate inter-sensory discordance produced by sensory errors (particularly in sound localization) and variability in (...)
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  6.  2 DLs
    Christopher D. Chambers & Jason B. Mattingley (2005). Putting the Premotor Theory to the Test. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):542-550.
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  7.  2 DLs
    Andrea M. Loftus, Michael E. R. Nicholls, Jason B. Mattingley & John L. Bradshaw (2008). Left to Right: Representational Biases for Numbers and the Effect of Visuomotor Adaptation. Cognition 107 (3):1048-1058.
    Adaptation to right-shifting prisms improves left neglect for mental number line bisection. This study examined whether adaptation affects the mental number line in normal participants. Thirty-six participants completed a mental number line task before and after adaptation to either: left-shifting prisms, right-shifting prisms or control spectacles that did not shift the visual scene. Participants viewed number triplets (e.g. 16, 36, 55) and determined whether the numerical distance was greater on the left or right side of the inner number. Participants demonstrated (...)
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  8.  2 DLs
    Anina N. Rich & Jason B. Mattingley (2010). Out of Sight, Out of Mind: The Attentional Blink Can Eliminate Synaesthetic Colours. Cognition 114 (3):320-328.
    Mechanisms of selective attention exert a powerful influence on visual perception. We examined whether attentional selection is necessary for generation of the vivid colours experienced by individuals with grapheme-colour synaesthesia. Twelve synaesthetes and matched controls viewed rapid serial displays of nonsense characters within which were embedded an oriented grating (T1) and a letter-prime (T2), forming a modified attentional blink (AB) task. At the end of the stream a coloured probe appeared that was either congruent or incongruent with the synaesthetic colour (...)
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  9.  0 DLs
    Jason B. Mattingley, Anina N. Rich, Greg Yelland & John L. Bradshaw (2001). Unconscious Priming Eliminates Automatic Binding of Colour and Alphanumeric Form in Synaesthesia. Nature 410 (6828):580-582.