Search results for 'Jason T. Clower' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Jason T. Clower (2011). Mou Zongsan on the Five Periods of the Buddha's Teaching. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):190-205.
  2. Gary James Jason (2006). Book Review Of: R. T. Carroll, The Skeptic's Dictionary: A Collection of Strange Beliefs, Amusing Deceptions, & Dangerous Delusions. [REVIEW] Liberty (April):49-52.
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  3.  25
    Jason Clower (2010). The Unlikely Buddhologist: Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New Confucianism. Brill.
    This highly accessible book provides a comprehensive unpacking and interpretation, suitable for students and scholars in all fields, of towering philosopher Mou ...
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  4.  14
    Jason Clower (2012). The Religious Philosophy of Liang Shuming: The Hidden Buddhist. By Thierry Meynard. (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2011. Xxv, 226 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 1875-9386.). [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):614-616.
  5.  19
    Zeno Vendler, M. Glouberman, Gary Jason, George N. Schlesinger, Roberto Torretti, Bowman L. Clarke, Richard T. De George, Avner Cohen, Tecla Mazzarese, A. Modal Logician & J. Gellman (1987). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia 17 (2):211-216.
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  6.  1
    Jason Clower (2014). Sébastien Billioud. Thinking Through Confucian Modernity: A Study of Mou Zongsan's Moral Metaphysics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):217-219.
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  7. Jason Clower (ed.) (2014). Late Works of Mou Zongsan: Selected Essays on Chinese Philosophy. Brill.
    In Late Works of Mou Zongsan , this influential Chinese philosopher speaks on the future of Chinese culture, the achievements of Confucianism, the place of Buddhism and Daoism in Chinese philosophy, and the possibility of partnership between Chinese and Western thought.
     
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  8. Jacques Abbadie & W. T. (1695). The Art of Knowing One-Self: Or, an Enquiry Into the Sources of Morality [Tr. By T.W.].
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  9. Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. (1713). An Account of the Life and Writings of Mr. John Locke [by J. Le Clerc, Tr. By T.F.P.].
     
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  10. Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. (1714). An Account of the Life and Writings of Mr. John Locke [by J. Le Clerc, Tr. By T.F.P.]. [Followed by] the Last Will and Testament of John Locke. [REVIEW]
     
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  11. Jean Le Clerc & F. P. T. (1706). The Life and Character of Mr. John Locke. Done Into Engl. By T.F.P.
     
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  12. W. T. (1698). A Dialogue Between Mr. Merriman, and Dr. Chymist: Concerning John Sergents Paradoxes, in His New Method to Science, and His Solid Philosophy. By T.W. [REVIEW] [S.N.].
     
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  13. L. T. L. T. (1908). NUNN, T. P. -The Aim and Achievements of Scientific Method. [REVIEW] Mind 17:274.
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  14.  28
    Sébastien Billioud (2012). Clower, Jason: The Unlikely Buddhologist, Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New Confucianism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):101-104.
    Clower, Jason: The Unlikely Buddhologist, Tiantai Buddhism in M ou Zongsan’s New Confucianism Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9261-y Authors Sébastien Billioud, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité. UFR LCAO/East Asian Studies Department, Case 7009, 16 rue Marguerite Duras, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 Paris, France Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  15. David B. Hershenov (2008). Thomistic Principles and Bioethics, by Jason T. Eberl. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (1):191-194.
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  16. Kwan Chun Keung (2014). The Unlikely Buddhologist: Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan’s New Confucianism by Jason Clower. Philosophy East and West 64 (4):1075-1077.
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  17. Stefania Travagnin (2014). The Unlikely Buddhologist: Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New Confucianism. By Jason Clower. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (S1):761-764.
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  18. Jason Slone (2007). Theological Incorrectness: Why Religious People Believe What They Shouldn't. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Why do religious people believe what they shouldn't -- not what others think they shouldn't believe, but things that don't accord with their own avowed religious beliefs? D. Jason Slone terms this phenomenon "theological incorrectness." He argues that it exists because the mind is built in such a way that it's natural for us to think divergent thoughts simultaneously. Human minds are great at coming up with innovative ideas that help them make sense of the world, he says, but (...)
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  19. D. Jason Slone (2004). Theological Incorrectness: Why Religious People Believe What They Shouldn't. Oxford University Press Usa.
    "Ask two religious people one question, and you'll get three answers!" Why do religious people believe what they shouldn't--not what others think they shouldn't believe, but things that don't accord with their own avowed religious beliefs? This engaging book explores this puzzling feature of human behavior. D. Jason Slone terms this phenomenon "theological incorrectness." He demonstrates that it exists because the mind is built it such a way that it's natural for us to think divergent thoughts simultaneously. Human minds (...)
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  20.  7
    Jason T. Eberl (2009). " If You Could Cure Cancer by Killing One Person, Wouldn't You Have to Do That?". In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press 297.
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  21.  8
    Jason T. Eberl (2006). Thomistic Principles and Bioethics. Routledge.
    Thomas Aquinas is one of the foremost thinkers in Western philosophy and Christian scholarship, recognized as a significant voice in both theological discussions and secular philosophical debates. Alongside a revival of interest in Thomism in philosophy, scholars have realized its relevance when addressing certain contemporary issues in bioethics. This book offers a rigorous interpretation of Aquinas's metaphysics and ethical thought, and highlights its significance to questions in bioethics. Jason T. Eberl applies Aquinas's views on the seminal topics of human (...)
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  22. Jason T. Eberl (2013). Thomistic Principles and Bioethics. Routledge.
    Alongside a revival of interest in Thomism in philosophy, scholars have realised its relevance when addressing certain contemporary issues in bioethics. This book offers a rigorous interpretation of Aquinas's metaphysics and ethical thought, and highlights its significance to questions in bioethics. Jason T. Eberl applies Aquinas’s views on the seminal topics of human nature and morality to key questions in bioethics at the margins of human life – questions which are currently contested in the academia, politics and the media (...)
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  23.  24
    Jason A. Clark & Daniel M. T. Fessler (2015). The Role of Disgust in Norms, and of Norms in Disgust Research: Why Liberals Shouldn’T Be Morally Disgusted by Moral Disgust. Topoi 34 (2):483-498.
    Recently, many critics have argued that disgust is a morally harmful emotion, and that it should play no role in our moral and legal reasoning. Here we defend disgust as a morally beneficial moral capacity. We believe that a variety of liberal norms have been inappropriately imported into both moral psychology and ethical studies of disgust: disgust has been associated with conservative authors, values, value systems, and modes of moral reasoning that are seen as inferior to the values and moral (...)
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  24.  63
    Jason Brennan (2014). How Smart is Democracy? You Can't Answer That Question a Priori. Critical Review 26 (1-2):33-58.
  25. Kent Bach (2012). Review, Jason Stanley, Know How. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    Stanley’s insightful new book refines his earlier formulation of intellectualism. Indeed, it does a whole lot more, but leaves open some tough questions. He makes a powerful case for the view that knowing how to do something is to know, of a certain way, that one could do that thing in that way. But he says surprisingly little about what ways are, and how they might differ, depending on the kind of case. And he doesn't exclude the possibility that in (...)
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  26.  16
    Amber L. Griffioen (2015). Why Jim Joyce Wasn’T Wrong: Baseball and the Euthyphro Dilemma. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (3):327-348.
    In 2010, pitcher Armando Galarraga was denied a perfect game when umpire Jim Joyce called Jason Donald safe at first with two outs in the bottom of the 9th. In the numerous media discussions that followed, Joyce’s ‘blown’ call was commonly referred to as ‘mistaken’, ‘wrong’, or otherwise erroneous. However, this use of language makes some not uncontroversial ontological assumptions. It claims that the fact that a runner is safe or out has nothing to do with the ruling of (...)
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  27.  12
    Jason Merchant, Why No(T)?
    This note presents a simple, novel diagnostic for determining the phrase structural status of negative markers cross-linguistically, a topic of enduring interest (for recent approaches and references see Haegeman; Zanuttini; Giannakidou, Landscape and Polarity). If the sentential negative marker in a given language is phrasal (an XP, generally adverbial), it will occur in the collocation why not?; if it is a head (an X 0, generally clitic-like), it will not. In the latter languages, the word for ‘no’ can sometimes be (...)
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  28.  21
    Jason Kaufman & Matthew E. Kaliner (2011). The Re-Accomplishment of Place in Twentieth Century Vermont and New Hampshire: History Repeats Itself, Until It Doesn't. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 40 (2):119-154.
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  29. Jonathan Ellis, Knowing How to Do What One Can't Do.
    In this paper, I argue against Alva Noë’s defense of the claim that knowing how to do something requires being able to do it. Noë objects to Jason Stanley and Timothy Williamson’s arguments against this claim by charging that their arguments involve a lot of what he calls “GOOP”: good old-fashioned Oxford philosophy. I provide an example in which I claim an individual knows how to do something that he is unable to do. The example is persuasive, I maintain, (...)
     
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  30.  3
    Jason Hanna (2013). “It Won't Be as Bad as You Think:” Autonomy and Adaptation to Disability. In Juha Räikkä & Jukka Varelius (eds.), Adaptation and Autonomy: Adaptive Preferences in Enhancing and Ending Life. Springer 49--68.
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  31.  3
    Jason Morrison & Anthony S. David (2005). Now You See It, Now You Don't: More Data at the Cognitive Level Needed Before the PAD Model Can Be Accepted. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6).
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  32.  6
    Jason Sorens (2000). The Failure to Converge: Why Globalization Doesn't Cause Deregulation. Critical Review 14 (1):19-33.
    Abstract Conventional wisdom holds that the rigors of fiscal competition unleashed by globalization are forcing governments to roll back welfare programs, reduce or eliminate taxes on capital, and reduce regulation on mobile assets. In Freer Markets, More Rules, Steven Vogel attacks the latter contention, arguing that regulatory reform has been more often reregulatory than deregulatory, though it is generally undertaken with an eye to increasing market competition. He also maintains that governments have acted autonomously of social interests and market pressures (...)
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  33.  1
    H. T. Wade-Gery (1924). Jason of Pherae and Aleuas the Red. Journal of Hellenic Studies 44:55.
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  34.  1
    Franklin T. Harkins, György Heidl, Cornelia B. Horn, Robert P. Phenix & Joseph Lam C. Quy (2009). Jason BeDuhn, Augustine's Manichaean Dilemma. Vol. 1: Conversion and Apostasy, 373–388 CE Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009. D. Jeffrey Bingham, Ed., The Routledge Companion to Early Christian Thought. New York: Routledge, 2009. Virginia Burrus, Ed., Late Ancient Christianity: A People's History of Christianity, Vol. [REVIEW] Augustinian Studies 40 (2):323.
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  35. T. Basboll (2007). Jason Stanley, Knowledge and Practical Interests. Philosophy in Review 27 (3):225.
     
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  36. Jason König (2007). Ordering Knowledge”: J. König and T. Whitmarsh. In Jason König & Tim Whitmarsh (eds.), Ordering Knowledge in the Roman Empire. Cambridge University Press 3--39.
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  37. Jason Turner (2016). The Facts in Logical Space: A Tractarian Ontology. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Philosophers have long been tempted by the idea that objects and properties are abstractions from the facts. But how is this abstraction supposed to go? If the objects and properties aren't 'already' there, how do the facts give rise to them? Jason Turner develops and defends a novel answer to this question: The facts are arranged in a quasi-geometric 'logical space', and objects and properties arise from different quasi-geometric structures in this space.
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  38. Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams (2011). Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value of specific policies designed to enshrine (...)
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  39. Jason T. Eberl & Rebecca A. Ballard (2009). Metaphysical and Ethical Perspectives on Creating Animal-Human Chimeras. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (5):470-486.
    This paper addresses several questions related to the nature, production, and use of animal-human chimeras. At the heart of the issue is whether certain types of animal-human chimeras should be brought into existence, and, if they are, how we should treat such creatures. In our current research environment we recognize a dichotomy between research involving nonhuman animal subjects and research involving human subjects, and the classification of a research protocol into one of these categories will trigger different ethical standards as (...)
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  40. Jason T. Eberl (2012). Metaphysical and Moral Status of Cryopreserved Embryos. The Linacre Quarterly 79 (3):304-315.
    Those who oppose human embryonic stem cell research argue for a clear position on the metaphysical and moral status of human embryos. This position does not differ whether the embryo is present inside its mother’s reproductive tract or in a cryopreservation tank. It is worth examining, however, whether an embryo in “suspended animation” has the same status as one actively developing in utero. I will explore this question from the perspective of Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical account of human nature. I conclude (...)
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  41.  39
    Jason T. Eberl (2005). Aquinas's Account of Human Embryogenesis and Recent Interpretations. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):379 – 394.
    In addressing bioethical issues at the beginning of human life, such as abortion, in vitro fertilization, and embryonic stem cell research, one primary concern regards establishing when a developing human embryo or fetus can be considered a person. Thomas Aquinas argues that an embryo or fetus is not a human person until its body is informed by a rational soul. Aquinas's explicit account of human embryogenesis has been generally rejected by contemporary scholars due to its dependence upon medieval biological data, (...)
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  42.  18
    Sandra Shapshay (ed.) (2009). Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Bioethics at the Movies explores the ways in which popular films engage basic bioethical concepts and concerns. Twenty philosophically grounded essays use cinematic tools such as character and plot development, scene-setting, and narrative-framing to demonstrate a range of principles and topics in contemporary medical ethics. The first section plumbs popular and bioethical thought on birth, abortion, genetic selection, and personhood through several films, including The Cider House Rules, Citizen Ruth, Gattaca, and I, Robot. In the second section, the contributors examine (...)
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  43. Maia M. Cherney, M. A. Qasim, Jason T. Maynes, Michael Laskowski Jr & Michael N. G. James (forthcoming). A Theory of Love and Sexual Desire. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour.
     
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  44.  23
    Jason T. Eberl (2000). The Beginning of Personhood: A Thomistic Biological Analysis. Bioethics 14 (2):134–157.
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  45.  27
    Jason T. Eberl (2008). Potentiality, Possibility, and the Irreversibility of Death. Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):61-77.
    This paper considers the issue of cryopreservation and the definition of death from an Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective. A central conceptual focus throughout this discussion is the purportedly irreversible nature of death and the criteria by which a human body is considered to be informed by a rational soul. It concludes that a cryopreserved corpse fails to have “life potentially in it” sufficient to satisfy Aristotle’s definition of ensoulment. Therefore, if the possibility that such a corpse may be successfully preserved and resuscitated (...)
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  46.  13
    Jason T. Eberl (2008). The Moral Status of 'Unborn Children' Without Rights. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):44 – 46.
  47. Jason T. Eberl (2009). Do Human Persons Persist Between Death and Resurrection? In Kevin Timpe & Eleonore Stump (eds.), Metaphysics and God: Essays in Honor of Eleonore Stump. Routledge
     
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  48.  18
    Jason T. Eberl (2000). The Metaphysics of Resurrection. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:215-230.
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  49.  28
    Jason T. Eberl (2010). Fetuses Are Neither Violinists nor Violators. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):53-54.
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  50.  8
    Jason T. Eberl (2007). Creating Non-Human Persons: Might It Be Worth the Risk? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):52 – 54.
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