Search results for 'Jay E. Cantor' (try it on Scholar)

45 found
Sort by:
  1. Carol Rausch Albright, Larry Arnhart, Donald E. Arther, Ian G. Barbour, Marc Bekoff, Arnold Benz, Dennis Bielfeldt, Frank E. Budenholzer, Geoffrey Cantor & Chris Kenny (2001). Index to Volume 36. Zygon 36 (4).score: 280.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Michelle E. Brady, Paul A. Cantor, Thomas Darby, Henry T. Edmondson Iii, Stephen L. Gardner, Marc D. Guerra, Gregory R. Johnson, Joseph M. Knippenberg, Peter Augustine Lawler, Daniel J. Mahoney, James F. Pontuso, Paul Seaton & Ashley Woodiwiss (2001). Faith, Reason, and Political Life Today. Lexington Books.score: 280.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. E. E. Abola, A. Bairoch, W. C. Barker, S. Beck, H. da BensonBerman, G. Cameron, C. Cantor, S. Doubet & T. J. P. Hubbard (2000). Quality Control in Databanks for Molecular Biology. Bioessays 22 (11):1024-1034.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John E. Alvis, Glenn C. Arbery, David N. Beauregard, Paul A. Cantor, John Freeh, Richard Harp, Peter Augustine Lawler, Mary P. Nichols, Nathan Schlueter, Gerard B. Wegemer & R. V. Young (2002). Shakespeare's Last Plays: Essays in Literature and Politics. Lexington Books.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John E. Alvis, George Anastaplo, Paul A. Cantor, Jerrold R. Caplan, Michael Davis, Robert Goldberg, Kenneth Hart Green, Harry V. Jaffa, Antonio Marino-López, Joshua Parens, Sharon Portnoff, Robert D. Sacks, Owen J. Sadlier & Martin D. Yaffe (2011). The Companionship of Books: Essays in Honor of Laurence Berns. Lexington Books.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. John Gibbons, Nathan Tarcov, Ralph Hancock, Jerry Weinberger, Paul A. Cantor, Mark Blitz, James W. Muller, Kenneth Weinstein, Clifford Orwin, Arthur Melzer, Susan Meld Shell, Peter Minowitz, James Stoner, Jeremy Rabkin, David F. Epstein, Charles R. Kesler, Glen E. Thurow, R. Shep Melnick, Jessica Korn & Robert P. Kraynak (2000). Educating the Prince: Essays in Honor of Harvey Mansfield. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Emanuele Rainone (2013). Ludwig Wittgenstein e i fondamenti della matematica. Quattro studi: Cantor, Dedekind, il Logicismo, la scoperta in matematica. Nóema 4.score: 144.0
    La critica che Ludwig Wittgenstein muove ai presupposti filosofici del dibattito sui fondamenti della matematica si estende oltre le tematiche specifiche di tale dibattito ed investe un’intera tradizione di pensiero. Dietro alle argomentazioni di Frege e Russell, alle dimostrazioni di Cantor e di Dedekind, al programma di Hilbert e al teorema di Gödel, c’è uno sfondo filosofico che le acute osservazioni del filosofo ci permette di smascherare. Questa ricerca, articolata in quattro studi, intende presentare alcuni momenti fondamentali del dibattito (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Martha Abreu (2010). O “crioulo Dudu”: participação política e identidade negra nas histórias de um músico cantor (1890-1920). Topoi 20:92-113.score: 120.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Alonzo Church (1952). Review: Georg Cantor, Philip E. B. Jourdain, Contributions to the Founding of the Theory of Transfinite Numbers. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 17 (3):208-208.score: 120.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Carlo Ierna (2012). La notion husserlienne de multiplicité : au-delà de Cantor et Riemann. Methodos. Savoirs Et Textes 12 (12).score: 66.0
    The concept of a Mannigfaltigkeit in Husserl has been given various interpretations, due to its shifting role in his works. Many authors have been misled by this term, placing it in the context of Husserl’s early period in Halle, while writing the Philosophy of Arithmetic, as a friend and colleague of Georg Cantor.Yet at the time, Husserl distanced himself explicitly from Cantor’s definition and rather took Bernhard Riemann as example, having studied and lectured extensively on Riemann’s theories of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. William Tait, Frege Versus Cantor and Dedekind: On the Concept of Number.score: 54.0
    There can be no doubt about the value of Frege's contributions to the philosophy of mathematics. First, he invented quantification theory and this was the first step toward making precise the notion of a purely logical deduction. Secondly, he was the first to publish a logical analysis of the ancestral R* of a relation R, which yields a definition of R* in second-order logic.1 Only a narrow and arid conception of philosophy would exclude these two achievements. Thirdly and very importantly, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Philip Kremer (2006). The Modal Logic of Continuous Functions on Cantor Space. Archive for Mathematical Logic 45 (8):1021-1032.score: 54.0
    Let $\mathcal{L}$ be a propositional language with standard Boolean connectives plus two modalities: an S4-ish topological modality $\square$ and a temporal modality $\bigcirc$ , understood as ‘next’. We extend the topological semantic for S4 to a semantics for the language $\mathcal{L}$ by interpreting $\mathcal{L}$ in dynamic topological systems, i.e. ordered pairs $\langle X, f\rangle$ , where X is a topological space and f is a continuous function on X. Artemov, Davoren and Nerode have axiomatized a logic S4C, and have shown (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ricardo Da Silva (2013). Un acercamiento al platonismo absoluto de Cantor. Apuntes Filosóficos 22 (42).score: 54.0
    Hacia finales del siglo XIX se llevó a cabo una gran revolución conceptual y metodológica en la matemática. En tal revolución se empezaron a emplear conceptos, métodos y técnicas que dejaban de lado la antigua forma de hacer matemática, propia del siglo XVIII y principios del siglo XIX, y a su vez proponían un Hacer abstracto, es decir, una forma abstracta de ocuparse del ente matemático. Pero no sólo se trataba de un cambio metodológico, sino que la pregunta por los (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. E. Carson (1998). Review of J. Belna, La Notion de Nombre Chez Dedekind, Cantor, Frege. Theories, Conceptions, Et Philosophie. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 6 (3):345-350.score: 36.0
  15. Peter Cholak & Rod Downey (1993). On the Cantor-Bendixon Rank of Recursively Enumerable Sets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 58 (2):629-640.score: 36.0
    The main result of this paper is to show that for every recursive ordinal α ≠ 0 and for every nonrecursive r.e. degree d there is a r.e. set of rank α and degree d.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Itaï Ben Yaacov (2008). Topometric Spaces and Perturbations of Metric Structures. Logic and Analysis 1 (3-4):235-272.score: 36.0
    We develop the general theory of topometric spaces, i.e., topological spaces equipped with a well-behaved lower semi-continuous metric. Spaces of global and local types in continuous logic are the motivating examples for the study of such spaces. In particular, we develop Cantor-Bendixson analysis of topometric spaces, which can serve as a basis for the study of local stability (extending the ad hoc development in Ben Yaacov I and Usvyatsov A, Continuous first order logic and local stability. Trans Am Math (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Harvey Friedman, Krzysztof Kurdyka, Chris Miller & Patrick Speissegger (2010). Expansions of the Real Field by Open Sets: Definability Versus Interpretability. Journal of Symbolic Logic 75 (4):1311-1325.score: 36.0
    An open U ⊆ ℝ is produced such that (ℝ, +, ·, U) defines a Borel isomorph of (ℝ, +, ·, ℕ) but does not define ℕ. It follows that (ℝ, +, ·, U) defines sets in every level of the projective hierarchy but does not define all projective sets. This result is elaborated in various ways that involve geometric measure theory and working over o-minimal expansions of (ℝ, +, ·). In particular, there is a Cantor set E ⊆ (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. E. -Hw Kluge (1988). Norman L. Cantor, Legal Frontiers of Death and Dying Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (7):247-249.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Stephen Menn, G. E. Reyes, Teddy Seidenfeld & Wilfrid Sieg (1996). Frege Versus Cantor and Dedekind: On the Concept of Number WW Tait. In Matthias Schirn (ed.), Frege: Importance and Legacy. Walter de Gruyter. 70.score: 36.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Peter Schreiber (1996). Mengenlehre—Vom Himmel Cantors Zur Theoria Prima Inter Pares. NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 4 (1):129-143.score: 34.0
    On the occasion of the 150th birthday of Georg Cantor (1845–1918), the founder of the theory of sets, the development of the logical foundations of this theory is described as a sequence of catastrophes and of trials to save it. Presently, most mathematicians agree that the set theory exactly defines the subject of mathematics, i.e., any subject is a mathematical one if it may be defined in the language (i.e., in the notions) of set theory. Hence the nature of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Itaï Ben Yaacov (2010). Definability of Groups in ℵ₀-Stable Metric Structures. Journal of Symbolic Logic 75 (3):817-840.score: 28.0
    We prove that in a continuous ℵ₀-stable theory every type-definable group is definable. The two main ingredients in the proof are: 1. Results concerning Morley ranks (i.e., Cantor-Bendixson ranks) from [Ben08], allowing us to prove the theorem in case the metric is invariant under the group action; and 2. Results concerning the existence of translation-invariant definable metrics on type-definable groups and the extension of partial definable metrics to total ones.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Francesco Berto (2007). How to Sell a Contradiction. College Publications.score: 24.0
    There is a principle in things, about which we cannot be deceived, but must always, on the contrary, recognize the truth – viz. that the same thing cannot at one and the same time be and not be": with these words of the Metaphysics, Aristotle introduced the Law of Non-Contradiction, which was to become the most authoritative principle in the history of Western thought. However, things have recently changed, and nowadays various philosophers, called dialetheists, claim that this Law does not (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Timothy Bays (2009). Skolem's Paradox. In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Skolem's Paradox involves a seeming conflict between two theorems from classical logic. The Löwenheim Skolem theorem says that if a first order theory has infinite models, then it has models whose domains are only countable. Cantor's theorem says that some sets are uncountable. Skolem's Paradox arises when we notice that the basic principles of Cantorian set theory—i.e., the very principles used to prove Cantor's theorem on the existence of uncountable sets—can themselves be formulated as a collection of first (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Philip Kremer (2010). The Modal Logic of Continuous Functions on the Rational Numbers. Archive for Mathematical Logic 49 (4):519-527.score: 24.0
    Let ${{\mathcal L}^{\square\circ}}$ be a propositional language with standard Boolean connectives plus two modalities: an S4-ish topological modality □ and a temporal modality ◦, understood as ‘next’. We extend the topological semantic for S4 to a semantics for the language ${{\mathcal L}^{\square\circ}}$ by interpreting ${{\mathcal L}^{\square\circ}}$ in dynamic topological systems, i.e., ordered pairs 〈X, f〉, where X is a topological space and f is a continuous function on X. Artemov, Davoren and Nerode have axiomatized a logic S4C, and have shown (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. James Levine (2001). On Russell's Vulnerability to Russell's Paradox. History and Philosophy of Logic 22 (4):207-231.score: 24.0
    Influenced by G. E. Moore, Russell broke with Idealism towards the end of 1898; but in later years he characterized his meeting Peano in August 1900 as ?the most important event? in ?the most important year in my intellectual life?. While Russell discovered his paradox during his post-Peano period, the question arises whether he was already committed, during his pre-Peano Moorean period, to assumptions from which his paradox may be derived. Peter Hylton has argued that the pre-Peano Russell was thus (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. A. S. Troelstra (1981). On a Second Order Propositional Operator in Intuitionistic Logic. Studia Logica 40 (2):113 - 139.score: 24.0
    This paper studies, by way of an example, the intuitionistic propositional connective * defined in the language of second order propositional logic by. In full topological models * is not generally definable, but over Cantor-space and the reals it can be classically shown that; on the other hand, this is false constructively, i.e. a contradiction with Church's thesis is obtained. This is comparable with some well-known results on the completeness of intuitionistic first-order predicate logic.Over [0, 1], the operator * (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John L. Bell, Constructive Context.score: 24.0
    One of the most familiar uses of the Russell paradox, or, at least, of the idea underlying it, is in proving Cantor's theorem that the cardinality of any set is strictly less than that of its power set. The other method of proving Cantor's theorem — employed by Cantor himself in showing that the set of real numbers is uncountable — is that of diagonalization. Typically, diagonalization arguments are used to show that function spaces are "large" in (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Leo Harrington & Robert I. Soare (1996). Definability, Automorphisms, and Dynamic Properties of Computably Enumerable Sets. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 2 (2):199-213.score: 24.0
    We announce and explain recent results on the computably enumerable (c.e.) sets, especially their definability properties (as sets in the spirit of Cantor), their automorphisms (in the spirit of Felix Klein's Erlanger Programm), their dynamic properties, expressed in terms of how quickly elements enter them relative to elements entering other sets, and the Martin Invariance Conjecture on their Turing degrees, i.e., their information content with respect to relative computability (Turing reducibility).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Matthias Schirn (2010). Consistency, Models, and Soundness. Axiomathes 20 (2-3):153-207.score: 24.0
    This essay consists of two parts. In the first part, I focus my attention on the remarks that Frege makes on consistency when he sets about criticizing the method of creating new numbers through definition or abstraction. This gives me the opportunity to comment also a little on H. Hankel, J. Thomae—Frege’s main targets when he comes to criticize “formal theories of arithmetic” in Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik (1884) and the second volume of Grundgesetze der Arithmetik (1903)—G. Cantor, L. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ernest J. Welti (1987). The Philosophy of Strict Finitism. Theoria 2 (2):575-582.score: 24.0
    The philosolphy of strict finitism is a research programme containing developmental theory and mathematics as its main branches. The first branch is concerned with the ontogenetic and historicaldevelopment of various concepts of infinity. The frame work is Jean Piaget’s genetic epistemology. Based upon these develop mental studies, the mathematical branch introduces a new concept of infinity into mathematics. Cantor propagated the actual infinite, Brouwer and the constructivists the potential infinite. Still more radical is strict finitism, favoring the natural infinite, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Daniel Bonevac (1984). Mathematics and Metalogic. The Monist 67 (1):56-71.score: 24.0
    In this paper I shall attempt to outline a nominalistic theory of mathematical truth. I call my theory nominalistic because it avoids a real (see [4]) ontological commitment to abstract entities. Traditionally, nominalists have found it difficult to justify any reference to infinite collections in mathematics. Even those who have tried to do so have typically restricted themselves to predicative and, thus, denumerable realms. I Indeed, many have linked impredicative definitions to platonism; nominalists have tended to agree with Weyl that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Hermann G. W. Burchard (2005). Symbolic Languages and Natural Structures a Mathematician's Account of Empiricism. Foundations of Science 10 (2):153-245.score: 24.0
    The ancient dualism of a sensible and an intelligible world important in Neoplatonic and medieval philosophy, down to Descartes and Kant, would seem to be supplanted today by a scientific view of mind-in-nature. Here, we revive the old dualism in a modified form, and describe mind as a symbolic language, founded in linguistic recursive computation according to the Church-Turing thesis, constituting a world L that serves the human organism as a map of the Universe U. This methodological distinction of L (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Matthias Schirn (2013). Frege's Approach to the Foundations of Analysis (1874–1903). History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (3):266-292.score: 24.0
    The concept of quantity (Größe) plays a key role in Frege's theory of real numbers. Typically enough, he refers to this theory as ?theory of quantity? (?Größenlehre?) in the second volume of his opus magnum Grundgesetze der Arithmetik (Frege 1903). In this essay, I deal, in a critical way, with Frege's treatment of the concept of quantity and his approach to analysis from the beginning of his academic career until Frege 1903. I begin with a few introductory remarks. In Section (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Andreas Weiermann (2003). An Application of Graphical Enumeration to PA. Journal of Symbolic Logic 68 (1):5-16.score: 24.0
    For α less than ε0 let $N\alpha$ be the number of occurrences of ω in the Cantor normal form of α. Further let $\mid n \mid$ denote the binary length of a natural number n, let $\mid n\mid_h$ denote the h-times iterated binary length of n and let inv(n) be the least h such that $\mid n\mid_h \leq 2$ . We show that for any natural number h first order Peano arithmetic, PA, does not prove the following sentence: For (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Andreas Weiermann (1993). Bounds for the Closure Ordinals of Essentially Monotonic Increasing Functions. Journal of Symbolic Logic 58 (2):664-671.score: 24.0
    Let $\Omega:= \aleph_1$ . For any $\alpha \Omega:\xi = \omega^\xi\}$ let EΩ (α) be the finite set of ε-numbers below Ω which are needed for the unique representation of α in Cantor-normal form using 0, Ω, +, and ω. Let $\alpha^\ast:= \max (E_\Omega(\alpha) \cup \{0\})$ . A function f: εΩ + 1 → Ω is called essentially increasing, if for any $\alpha < \varepsilon_{\Omega + 1}; f(\alpha) \geq \alpha^\ast: f$ is called essentially monotonic, if for any $\alpha,\beta < \varepsilon_{\Omega (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Cristian S. Calude, WHAT IS. . . A Halting Probability?score: 24.0
    Turing’s famous 1936 paper “On computable numbers, with an application to the Entscheidungsproblem” defines a computable real number and uses Cantor’s diagonal argument to exhibit an uncomputable real. Roughly speaking, a computable real is one that one can calculate digit by digit, that there is an algorithm for approximating as closely as one may wish. All the reals one normally encounters in analysis are computable, like π, √2 and e. But they are much scarcer than the uncomputable reals because, (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Salvatore Florio (2014). Untyped Pluralism. Mind 123 (490):317-337.score: 24.0
    In the semantic debate about plurals, pluralism is the view that a plural term denotes some things in the domain of quantification and a plural predicate denotes a plural property, i.e a property that can be instantiated by many things jointly. According to a particular version of this view, untyped pluralism, there is no type distinction between objects and properties. In this article, I argue against untyped pluralism by showing that it is subject to a variant of a Russell-style argument (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Duško Pavlović (1992). On the Structure of Paradoxes. Archive for Mathematical Logic 31 (6):397-406.score: 24.0
    Paradox is a logical phenomenon. Usually, it is produced in type theory, on a type Ω of “truth values”. A formula Ψ (i.e., a term of type Ω) is presented, such that Ψ↔¬Ψ (with negation as a term¬∶Ω→Ω)-whereupon everything can be proved: In Sect. 1 we describe a general pattern which many constructions of the formula Ψ follow: for example, the well known arguments of Cantor, Russell, and Gödel. The structure uncovered behind these paradoxes is generalized in Sect. 2. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Vera Fischer & Asger Törnquist (2010). A Co-Analytic Maximal Set of Orthogonal Measures. Journal of Symbolic Logic 75 (4):1403-1414.score: 24.0
    We prove that if V = L then there is a $\Pi _{1}^{1}$ maximal orthogonal (i.e., mutually singular) set of measures on Cantor space. This provides a natural counterpoint to the well-known theorem of Preiss and Rataj [16] that no analytic set of measures can be maximal orthogonal.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Piotr Błaszczyk (2004). O przedmiocie matematycznym. Filozofia Nauki 2 (1):45-59.score: 24.0
    In this paper we show that the field of the real numbers is an intentional object in the sense specified by Roman Ingarden in his Das literarische Kunstwer and Der Streit um die Existenz der Welt. An ontological characteristics of a classic example of an intentional object, i.e. a literary character, is developed. There are three principal elements of such an object: the author, the text and the entity in which the literary character forms the content. In the case of (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jose Luis Bermudez (2009). Truth, Indefinite Extensibility, and Fitch's Paradox. In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    A number of authors have noted that the key steps in Fitch’s argument are not intuitionistically valid, and some have proposed this as a reason for an anti-realist to accept intuitionistic logic (e.g. Williamson 1982, 1988). This line of reasoning rests upon two assumptions. The first is that the premises of Fitch’s argument make sense from an anti-realist point of view – and in particular, that an anti-realist can and should maintain the principle that all truths are knowable. The second (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Matthew E. Moore (2007). The Genesis of the Peircean Continuum. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (3):425 - 469.score: 12.0
    : In the Cambridge Conferences Lectures of 1898 Peirce defines a continuum as a "collection of so vast a multitude" that its elements "become welded into one another." He links the transinfinity (the "vast multitude") of a continuum to the confusion of its elements by a line of mathematical reasoning closely related to Cantor's Theorem. I trace the mathematical and philosophical roots of this conception of continuity, and examine its unresolved tensions, which arise mainly from difficulties in Peirce's theory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Matthew E. Moore (2002). A Cantorian Argument Against Infinitesimals. Synthese 133 (3):305 - 330.score: 12.0
    In 1887 Georg Cantor gave an influential but cryptic proof of theimpossibility of infinitesimals. I first give a reconstruction ofCantor's argument which relies mainly on traditional assumptions fromEuclidean geometry, together with elementary results of Cantor's ownset theory. I then apply the reconstructed argument to theinfinitesimals of Abraham Robinson's nonstandard analysis. Thisbrings out the importance for the argument of an assumption I call theChain Thesis. Doubts about the Chain Thesis are seen to render thereconstructed argument inconclusive as an attack (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. E. Cantore (1970). Science and Humanism : The Sapiential Role of Philosophy. Dialectica 24 (1‐3):215-241.score: 8.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation