1. Jay Hegdé, Serena K. Thompson, Mark Brady & Daniel Kersten (2012). Object Recognition in Clutter: Cortical Responses Depend on the Type of Learning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
    Theoretical studies suggest that the visual system uses prior knowledge of visual objects to recognize them in visual clutter, and posit that the strategies for recognizing objects in clutter may differ depending on whether or not the object was learned in clutter to begin with. We tested this hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of human subjects. We trained subjects to recognize naturalistic, yet novel objects in strong or weak clutter. We then tested subjects’ recognition performance for both sets (...)
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  2. Jay Hegdé (2007). Mental Time Travel Sickness and a Bayesian Remedy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):323-324.
    Mental time travel is a principled, but a narrow and computationally limiting, implementation of foresight. Future events can be predicted with sufficient specificity without having to have episodic memory of specific past events. Bayesian estimation theory provides a framework by which one can make predictions about specific future events by combining information about various generic patterns in the past experience.
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  3. Jay Hegdé & Norman A. Johnson (2006). Folk Psychology Meets Folk Darwinism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):476-477.
    The fact that beliefs in the supernatural are useful to people who hold them does not necessarily mean that these beliefs confer an evolutionary advantage to those who hold them. An evolutionary explanation for any biological phenomenon must meet rigorous criteria, but the facts in this case, even when taken at their face value, fall well short of these criteria.
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